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I second that, AD deserves better. When I saw the icon for the first time in App Store, it rised my eyebrows, but not my attention.
Other apps logos are also problematic, especially Publisher's.

Overly, their color coding is rather weak in my opinion and chosen attributes won't work well in small sizes. Maybe it's an opportunity for design contest? ;)

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+1 

 

The ultimate marketing tool: this product (AD) is so usable, that it can make you more more productive, creative and confident than its creators. Job done!

 

The proof is in the pudding.Yum yum!


MacBook pro, 2.26 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo, 4 GB 1067 MHz DDR3, NVIDIA GeForce 9400M 256 MB, OS X 10.11.6

 

http://www.pinterest.com/peter2111

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Well, I'm reading this thread... so I'm sure others here are too - if you fancied having a stab at reducing the complexity of the design/flattening the look and feel to be more OS X Yosemite, then I'm all ears (or should that be eyes?) :)

 

Thanks,

Matt

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The AD app icon/logo is pretty detailed. I don't find it ugly; more like...capable...broad...exact.

 

if you want to go with simpler, I'll always line up at that window, but seriously, I interact with that icon maybe for 2 seconds at a time, long enough for my little brain to say, "THERE it is!!"  so I am not studying it..I am using it for the quick recognition a good logo or icon should provide.

 

Maybe an evolution is in order? Overall I think they're more on the right track than not with that A-shape...that bit stands out in a galaxy of icons and logos..

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Have to work in the branding and design business in the past, it is highly recommended that Logo should be in one or two flat colours so it keep the cost down and easy to print and to read. I think maybe play with "A" for Affinity, or perhaps  two "FF". The best logo are dead simple, look at IBM, Apple, Adobe etc. 

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FYI folks, Aff is close to the German word for monkey (I'm an Inselaffe :P) and it would clash with a million acronyms should people confusedly start searching the web for it.


Twitter: @Writer_Dale
Home setup: Intel Q6600, NVIDIA GTX950, Windows 10     
Work setup: Intel i7-6700, NVIDIA Quadro K1200, Windows 10

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Regarding naming, there's a bit of inconsistency to me with names Designer, Photo and Publisher. Shouldn't it be Photographer? I realise it's too long, so maybe Retoucher? This way you avoid the problem with abbreviations, too — AD, AR, AP. You welcome  :)


—ALx

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I see where you're going, Znak and I largely agree. The  problem with picking a great name or a great logo is that, in a sense, there's a narrow aperture in the human mind where you can really slam it home.  You have to speak to what a user can do with a software tool rather than limiting their understanding of what they can do.

 

here is what I mean.  to me, software named "Photographer" tells me that it's meant for photographers...maybe lets them lightbox their stuff, export it for their client, etc.  With a name like "Photoshop," I get the sense that that's a place, so to speak, where I can do whatever I want..thanks to the "shop" part of the name.  Like...workshop, only it's for images. Now, you can do things with Photoshop having nothing to do with photos, but by now, the public so thoroughly knows "Photoshop" that it's like the words "Kleenex" or "Xerox." These names belong to go-to technologies applicable across a spectrum of needs. And that is what puts steak on the table.

 

So, the trick here is an easy-to-remember, easy-to-understand word or logo that tells a broad spectrum of users: "this is your horse."

 

It's too bad the words, "Illustrator" and "Photoshop" are taken, as they are pretty darn good. "InDesign," IMHO is weak sauce. It feels contrived...forced ingratiation...

 

I feel there are other words which Serif could make their own and convey the idea nicely.  As more visual designers work in web and interactive, as opposed to Print, the metaphors and boundaries blur and change. Just look at how Affinity Designer integrates raster tools in a vector atelier.  We don't need no steenkin' boundaries!

 

I think that naming solutions are to be found in there..somewhere...

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Affiniy Designer Suite     ADS

 

Affinity Vector                   AV

Affinity Image                   AI

Affinity Magazine             AM

 

 

It show easily what you can do with every app :D

 

Designer... designing it's more general, better for the complete suite.... I think. (IMHO)

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Affiniy Designer Suite     ADS

 

Affinity Vector                   AV

Affinity Image                   AI

Affinity Magazine             AM

 

 

It show easily what you can do with every app :D

 

Designer... designing it's more general, better for the complete suite.... I think. (IMHO)

I think this is very good reasoning....

 

What about the ppl who aren't doing a magazine, though?  What is the commonality for what a layout app can be used for?

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Yep, "Photoshop" is a great name that made its way to English dictionary. I think that's an amazing feat! "Illustrator" is a different animal and "InDesign" is a choice I don't understand at all! What were they smoking? ;)

 

I agree what you're saying VectorCat. It's not easy and equally significant to find the right name. But I wouldn't necessarily reject a name that doesn't include every aspect of a software it represents. I think it's more about a combination of originality and utility. And the rest is marketing :)

 

Inkscape, Pixelmator, PageMaker, FreeHand, Photoshop, Painter, CorelDRAW, QuarkXPress, Pages, Ventura, Calamus, Microsoft Publisher... 

 

The question is, should Serif give more thought to naming and isn't it too late now once Designer is in the wild?

 

When you think about naming, it's important to imagine all possible use cases. Is it easy to use, say, remember? Can it be confused with other product, both from the competition and within suite? Would "AI" (Affinity Image as suggested by Raskolnikov above) be confused with "AI" (Adobe Illustrator) if used outside Affinity support forums?

 

Let's not forget there's "Affinity" — the name for the creative suite. Wouldn't make more sense grammatically and be more original to use:

 

"Photo Affinity",

"Layout Affinity", and

hmm, not sure! :D


—ALx

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Vectorphilia

Imagenphilia

Publicphilia

 

:D

 

I think this is very good reasoning....

 

What about the ppl who aren't doing a magazine, though?  What is the commonality for what a layout app can be used for?

 

Well , I suppose if somebody sees that a programa can design a magazine, maybe can do a book, or ebook, or whatever publication :)

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The question is, should Serif give more thought to naming and isn't it too late now once Designer is in the wild?

 

When you think about naming, it's important to imagine all possible use cases. Is it easy to use, say, remember? Can it be confused with other product, both from the competition and within suite? Would "AI" (Affinity Image as suggested by Raskolnikov above) be confused with "AI" (Adobe Illustrator) if used outside Affinity support forums?

 

Programs can be renamed once they start to belong to a complete suite :) it's just a restructuration :)

 

yes AI can be confused to Illustrator... :) it was just brainstorming

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Good discussion, Znak...

 

and here are more things to throw into the mix... QuarkXPress...what on earth does that have to do with page layout, other than "Press", and when you say it, you don't think "Press" you think "Express"

 

Microsoft?  Maybe at one time Micro (computer) Soft(ware) made a lot of sense, but now it seems sadly anachronistic.

 

Apple? Just because Steve Jobs worked on an apple farm and loved apples? What's the relationship to computers and personal electronics?

 

We could go on.  Affinity is a positive-sounding word, so I feel there's nothing wrong with it at all, and many things right with it.

 

By the time a name becomes associated with a thing, all of this academic discussion evaporates in significance, yes?

 

Thank you for batting about these ideas!

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