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Trying to create the ideal painting brush

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I'm trying to make a painting brush, to create a painting in AD. It looks as if I'm going in the right direction.

I'll make another to do more detailed work, we'll see what we need later on

For the moment I'm only doing b&w paintings, I will dive in later to make them mix colors.

This is actually fun to do !

post-4047-0-43184600-1420270342_thumb.png

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Schermafbeelding2015-01-03om110808_zpsec

 

I used a picture of crumpled alluminium foil, got rid of saturation, and with levels ,made it almost black and white.I removed the whit to get a transparent background.

Then I gave it a gaussian blur, and reduced the opacity.

So far for the brushtip. It looks a bit pastel like ,I think.

I would like to be able to make a more oilpaint like brush, but This will do for now...

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Nice job!

Yep... It is closer to a sort of Chalk/Charcoal than an oil brush.

 

My suggestion for the nozzle is to try with a "shape masked" texture as this one.

 

pencil.png

 

The result will be something like this

 

oilStrokes.png


The white dog, making tools for artists, illustrators and doodlers

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I was thinking. What are the visual properties of oil paint and what gives it the feel and texture? Try messing with the 3d layer effect in the effect pallets you might be able to apply some depth and a tad bit of specular reflection to your strokes that might give it that oil paint effect you are looking for.

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Here is the brushes set.

 

 

The first is the brush of the above pasteldrawing, the others are a try for  painting brushes. Hope you like them.

 

 

EDIT: The brushes did not show color as suppposed, because I used only black & white with pressure. Now the brushes show the correct color.

(the slide hue jitter is set to "0")

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This discussion is really interesting...

I want to share my approach for raster apps with dabs based engines as Affinity Designer.

 

Oil is a pretty common media that can be emulated quite easily.

When you paint on analog medias there are two levels of textures: the first one is the surface you draw on, the second one is the resultant shape that intersects this surface (in the real world we are talking about 3d surfaces: the shape of your brush and the canvas with its peaks and valleys).

 

Also we should have to consider aspects such as the dilution of the pigment, bristle distribution and relative capillarity (which delivers a pattern itself) etc... But it becomes really hard to manage all these parameters, and the physical model tends to be really complex. On the other side this level of complexity doesn't really give results that justify such an effort (IMHO). 

 

Anyway we can achieve outstanding results only combining few parameters and using the multiple nozzles available in AD.

In the following table for the strokes I've used the nozzle shared in this thread, in the fourth stroke I've added the packed bristles showed in this tutorial.

OilPaintLook.jpg

As you can notice the Flow parameter is the one that manage the pigment quantity we leave on the canvas.

We can use the pressure to manage this distribution within the single stroke. 

In the second column there is a sort of representation of a perpendicular section of our surface that shows how the pigment fills the valleys (which are the darkest areas in the greyscale texture).

 

The coarse look brings an interesting texture, but is reached only using the multiple nozzle approach.

 

At the end the impasto... Personally I don't like this effect so much, it has a sort of late '90 look... :P

The very first releases of ZBrush, DeepPaint and Painter 6 gave a clever solution.

Today Painter seems to feel ashamed of this feature, Zbrush is a 3D sculpting tool and DeepPaint disappeared.

 

The technique suggested by Ronnie is the correct one, but doesn't work so good for overlapping strokes.

The apps mentioned before employed a sort of zbuffer channel to manage the impasto interaction.

 

A workaround could be the USM filter in Photoshop with a large radius  (I'm certain AffinityPhoto will have its respective too) which delivers a subtle effect but affects all strokes.


The white dog, making tools for artists, illustrators and doodlers

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Holy smoke.... To think this is all done in what is primarily a vector program with added on raster capabilities. I am blown away.

 

George


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Holy smoke.... To think this is all done in what is primarily a vector program with added on raster capabilities. I am blown away.

 

George

 

The real value is Hanzz skill!

 

Anyway AD raster engine is second to none.

Almost on par with PS and even faster!


The white dog, making tools for artists, illustrators and doodlers

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Thanks everyone ! ;)

Best of al for me is the tiny filesize......Not Mischief-wise small , but 28 MB for an A4 -300DPI is not bad either...

Now I'll ponder about making new brushes with this new information.

Not for today though ,sadly...

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Paolo,

 

Thanks for sharing your thoughts and experience on this. This very informative. So, my theory was some what going in the right direction I see. Yah,you are right  the blending and layering of the strokes don't blend in a manner that would make that a feasible approach. Bummer :(

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Great stuff here! Now I gotta play with these new brushes. Thanks so much, Hanzz and every body else who contributed to this interesting convo!


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Paolo,

 

Thanks for sharing your thoughts and experience on this. This very informative. So, my theory was some what going in the right direction I see. Yah,you are right  the blending and layering of the strokes don't blend in a manner that would make that a feasible approach. Bummer :(

 

Yep... The best implementation is Painter's one.

But can find a similar feature in Artweaver (Painter's clone) and PD Artist (in this case it is the oddest thing I've ever seen...).

 

The only way is to do it in post-processing. 

An alternative can be the emboss filter (as the one you can find in common raster editors).

This helps you lift up a sort of "faux depth" data and multiply it over your painting as separate layer.

 

impasto.jpg

 

In this case the texture is too gritty... And too kitsch...  :D


The white dog, making tools for artists, illustrators and doodlers

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Yah, that how I would have done it. Can you adjust the grayscale image? Perhaps, using the dial that controls the depth a bit or even change the opacity to change the influence it has on the blend mode of the grit layer? I even would add a canvas texture to the bottom as well so that the layers above would also be visually affected to believe it was painted on canvas. If we can't get exactly what we want we might at least end up with a couple of useful visual tricks that might get us by. 

 

I hear you on the kitcsh part though...  :)

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Can you adjust the grayscale image?

 

 

Sure! Using Layers or Curves (better) you can vary the contrast and so depth.

The only "baked" parameter is light source position.

 

Anyway, I think I've found a model that gives strokes a bit more material look that works for overlapping strokes too.

 

materialStrokes.png

Not perfect but doesn't need any post production.

Will post an article about this as soon as I can.


The white dog, making tools for artists, illustrators and doodlers

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WOW! Yah, that looking really good now! I think you got if figured out ! I am looking forward to your article on this. Thanks for pushing through on this, I think the work is totally worth the result!

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Very interesting thread. Awesome artwork, Hanzz! Paolo I am looking forward to your article.


Journey forth my friend, by body if needs be...

 

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