netsurfer912

[Multi] Linux. Seriously now.

246 posts in this topic

In this case I am going to break my own rule (not to mention other competing applications here anymore) because this time the app in question will not compete directly with Affinity since Affinity will not run on Linux (or WINE).

 

A professional alternative for photo editing for Windows that DOES work in WINE for Linux exists, and is even actively supported by the developers to run in WINE.

 

PhotoLine works without any issues in WINE on Linux. A number of users work with Photoline in WINE for their work on a daily basis - and the developers even added a Linux compatible colour management system alternative (Little CMS) that can be activated in the preferences. PhotoLine also happily supports vector editing, and will link to InkScape and Krita for a round-trip editing workflow.

 

Full CMYK and Lab support, mostly non-destructive workflow, non-destructive Raw editing, and 16 and 32bpc is supported. If you are working on Linux look no further for a great Adobe alternative.

 

Perhaps in five years or so when more users will have made the switch to Linux (I expect to do this myself in a couple of years) Affinity will be made available on that platform as well.

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It has been a long time since I've posted here. As Herbert123 has stated, there is an alternative for Affinity Photo that runs under Linux (through WINE)--and yes, it is PhotoLine. I have it installed on both of my Linux devices where it performs admirably. Some applications also installed are Macromedia Freehand MX (yes, it runs well under WINE) and sK1--which is an open source, postscript-based vector editor that runs natively under Linux and whose capabilities have been recently expanded in pursuit of the finalization of version 2.0 (sK1project.net).

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When I was younger and time came to buy my own computer from my own money for professional use I seriously considered all options: Windows, Mac, and whatever Unix variant would be most useful. At that time I needed Dreamweaver and Fireworks to run, that meant open source Unix systems were out already, and my decision fell on Mac because it was pretty much immune to the common viruses out there (and yes, the design played a part, too, but not a major one).

 

Everytime Apple released new versions of their OS and hardware I was more and more unhappy with the direction they are taking, catering more to casual iPhone users with needless applications and functionality (the loathed App Store being part of it) than serious professional computer users. That said, I’d happily switch to Linux or any variant if there was a serious professional graphics application with a well thought-out UI that is actively developed (not just on the side by a few enthusiasts). I’m not married to Apple.

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I just registered to comment on this thread.  

 

You guys are part of the very frustrating circular problem with Linux software: Companies don't port for Linux because it is a small platform, but it is a small platform because companies don't port for Linux.  It's an endless cycle that will never right itself without someone stepping in.  Games and Adobe software are the #1 reason why people are unable to switch to Linux. Games are getting much better lately, but Adobe will never budge.  We need someone like you to step in and make linux a viable platform for design work.

 

I totally understand it though.  It's expensive and time consuming to develop software (I'm a developer myself).  I just get frustrated with this to no end.  

 

Maybe you all should launch a kickstarter for a Linux port.  If the kickstarter fails, it fails.  Nothing of value was lost.  If it succeeds, you gain a new segment in the market and we get good design software to buy for the first time in history. 

 

Please consider it.

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Herbert123,

 

You have been asked, politely, not to continutally pedal PhotoLine on these boards.

 

We of course invite users to point out differences between our application and those produced by others - good or bad - but when a cursory search of the internet reveals a user whose sole purpose appears to be posting on nearly all PhotoLine competitor forums, posting only about the supposed advantages of PhotoLine over the application supported by that board (often with factually incorrect / contrived examples of its superiority), we will draw the line..

 

PhotoLine is indeed a genuine competitor for Affinity Photo, along with numerous other applications - their success or lack of it should be defined by the capability of their applications and the quality / reach of their marketing - not by paid / zealot users filing the forums of their competition with half-truths and misdirection.

 

I do not believe that what we are asking is unreasonable - please respect our request.

 

Andy.

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Herbert123,

 

You have been asked, politely, not to continutally pedal PhotoLine on these boards.

 

We of course invite users to point out differences between our application and those produced by others - good or bad - but when a cursory search of the internet reveals a user whose sole purpose appears to be posting on nearly all PhotoLine competitor forums, posting only about the supposed advantages of PhotoLine over the application supported by that board (often with factually incorrect / contrived examples of its superiority), we will draw the line..

 

PhotoLine is indeed a genuine competitor for Affinity Photo, along with numerous other applications - their success or lack of it should be defined by the capability of their applications and the quality / reach of their marketing - not by paid / zealot users filing the forums of their competition with half-truths and misdirection.

 

I do not believe that what we are asking is unreasonable - please respect our request.

 

Andy.

well others keep referring to PS all the time

e.g. some recent post about color management and live filter instancing in photo line was very interesting for me at least, the same as other PS comparisons are interesting.

most important thing in dev is to not reengineer everything and not think about every part from scratch and thus I think it is important to compare and name the state of the art.

 

if there are misinformation like that a live filter has no mask embedded, then I think it´s best to correct those directly in that thread, but it´s also not fair to assume that Herber123 knows every feature of AP and AD so there is always a chance of posting something wrong.

 

agan, it´s just that he works using PL and not PS and thus it seems more apparent. Frustrated PS users would also post questions about why a PS feature like output compression preview is not available yet, they do it all the time too.

 

 

as AP does not run using WINE I think it´s fair to give that note to use PhotoLine instead

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I would like to chime in and express, in hopefully a less demanding but nonetheless passionate manner, my strong wish for a Linux version as well. A couple of days ago I purchased Affinity Designer for Windows but my primary OS nowadays is Linux - as it is for the majority of Visual Effects artists actually, since most VFX studios run on Linux.

For most of us, Photoshop and ZBrush are the only reasons why we still have to dual-boot into Windows, and while there are valid alternatives for 3D sculpting on Linux (Maya, Blender, 3D Coat), Photoshop or Illustrator have no real match on Linux, unfortunately.

I can speak for myself and many of my colleagues that we'd be more than thrilled to ditch Photoshop and Adobe if Affinity would allow us to use Designer and Photo on Linux - and I'd gladly buy another license for that. :)

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I've purchased a windows license for Designer and I would buy another license for Linux in a heartbeat. Aside from the speed, security and efficiency of linux, I'd rather support an open operating system than Apple or MS. The only downside to linux is a lack of a design suite.

 

I don't understand the need for others to criticize linux so much when they don't use it.

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I have used it, quite (Linux, in console only, too), both at home and at companies. Is quite good, and there's enough software to be a one OS only for many individuals. What I tend to disagree is in the statements of one or another OS's users I hear most. " Linux / Windows / Mac OS is bad because..." I'm a Windows user, but have handled quite the 3. The 3 of them are really good. Someone saying Windows 10 is bad or hard to use, IMO, and no offense pretended, probably don't know Windows (in general) very deeply in terms of configuration, optimizing, privacy settings and deeper handling of the system. Same goes with Linux and Mac OS. One could tell me iOS is a bit limited if you want to use for example graphic software and iPad Pro as you only eco system for producing graphics, art. And I'd agree (indeed, I did not purchase the iPad pro mostly to this reason, that can be a certain obstacle for pro workflows) till certain point, as is true that this system hasn't got a strong file system, and lacks features important to color management, etc. But is an OS for tablets! I mean, it's years since I don't understand the OSes wars. I've worked a little -but intense- time as tech support, and... No OS is perfect, that I can tell you. Each of the 3 has terrific advantages not so common in the other two, I kind of see how they excel for different reasons, but any of the 3 can serve both general purposes and specialization (just happens that every OS most usual "niches" tend to differ in % of usage  for those specializations. ). 


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Official important stuff for Windows install and Aero. |  My Aero tips. |  Old inking trick/tutorial, ported from its usage in older applications.

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Hum...I knew about the addition of DCI-P3, which seems to be an standard supporting a wider gamut profile (than what all devices iOs were having till then, which is sRGB, a modified version of it, actually), also about True Tone, that one I will be sure to see how to deactivate it first day if I finally purchase an iPad Pro having this, as I don't wish that my ipad adapts color and brightness on its own if I'm designing. That's great for casual/average users,(switching to dark rooms for watching a movie, handling it at day light...) though. Both things come only with the 9.7 iPad Pro, in which I'm not interested, as my biggest issue with tablets for drawing is its small size. The iPad Pen is probably my favorite drawing device of all times, but I'd need a 15 or 17" size one to be comfortable. Surface Studio now from MS has  even bigger size, but they added once more the pen jitter, which you can also "enjoy" in SF3 and SF4, and I wont buy a jittery device, even while can fix to an extent with stabilizators like Nezumi. I want the line quality to start from excellence by hardware, then stabilize only in very specific cases.

 

So, till they release a 12.9 version with those, I wont even consider it, so, neither iOS... Even then, a 12.9 size can't replace not even for some hours the comfort of my big Intuos and 23" screen.

 

That said, what is quite interesting is the ColorSync thingy going to iOS, yes. But from what I have read in the past -confirmed now- about the whole thing, is that even with all that, iOS wont have a color management system with the needed completeness, as you have it on Mac OS and Windows. :/

 

And don't get me wrong, I'd love to get an iPad Pro, as sky is the limit with that Pencil's accuracy and natural handling, but gonna wait a bit that they release sth bigger, which I wouldn't really expect, unless they'd like now to damage MS Surface Studio (seems is an open battle now in the bigger drawing devices field with the new big tools from Wacom MS S. Studio, and my hopes is that Apple do the "Challenge...accepted!" thing and produces a 15" at least. ) and so produce a bigger tablet somehow. Maybe named iDrawingStudio Pro ? Joking, but too much of a coincidence that Wacom's latest expensive drawing laptop-tablets for drawing are called Wacom MobileStudio pro, then MS... I see a pattern, here...

 

If Apple would make a bigger tablet size, do quite more about color management and do sth more practical for files management in iOS, then yep, I know more than one that would skip the cintiq... Heck I would do, despite being Windows centric. Cintiq doesn't adds me much more to an Intuos Pro XL and average semi pro monitor. iPad pro of a big size will mean MUCH better pen feel and accuracy, and to be portable. Because Wacom Companion is portable yep, but way less that an iPad Pro. And things like paralax, calibration (well, you don't need that in iPad pro and there's no paralax problem) and many others , together with being the most portable, are actual usage advantages. (and compared to MS SF the pen related advantages are bigger than compared to Wacom.  )

 

So, besides color management, some more things have to move in the iOS/iPad Pro front as to be more interesting for illustrators (that said, there's a bazillion of them already using it professionally. They know the limitations and do a last 20% of the project in their Mac, Linux or Windows PC. And that's a personal decision/balance for each one...)


Freelance Illustrator, comic artist, graphic designer, 3D modeler, animator (2D/3D), texturer, graphics UI specialist, web designer (+ html/css), oil painter, pixel artist.

 

Official important stuff for Windows install and Aero. |  My Aero tips. |  Old inking trick/tutorial, ported from its usage in older applications.

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A myth that it can be or that it can be not?  I might have mentioned mostly Windows an Mac OS as have handled those more due to being myself quite an Adobe guy at companies. I have not calibrated my monitor using Linux, nor any other professional monitor in that OS, so I prefer not to speak much about it.  But I do very well know about Little CMS (used by Gimp already,and some other graphic softwares) , for good color management, and I'm a happy Krita user (handles quite well many matters related to color management, besides being an outstanding painting tool. ) Scribus handles color management quite well, and is already being used by printing companies... I have always been an only high end, top software in the market guy. Mostly as this is what every company expects from me to use (this is often not well understood by Linux a  bit fan users. You gotta fill the plate of food...). And I of course will never let my skills with those rust, for the case I would have to leave the freelancing world (sigh, I hope not! Life without bosses is so great :D ).  But today, funnily, in my professional activity right now I already use a majority of open source software, and several very specific and carefully selected commercial (windows) applications (Affinity/Serif have all the options to cover maybe even more than 50% of it (as they go releasing apps (btw, only speaking of the 3 ones, AP, AD, APub, 20 people for all, that's already too much!!)), from what am seeing in terms of quality and capability of the apps.   :)  )

 

I like about Linux that reminds me a lot the freedom one had in DOS system. And that is crazily configurable. Plus, obviously, the amazing community. That's the main power, imo. Of Apple.. How absolutely every detail is been taken care of, and how much is noticed the clear focus for graphic professionals. And let's admit it, that is darn easy to use and rock solid :D . About Windows... that I'm at home with it, know it deeply, I even fix/configure/optimize Windows based computers remotely, done by job and for helping friends/family. So, veeery sincerely, I don't understand really the OS wars...If money allowed it, and time to maintain them, I'd have a machine with one of each ... !!

 

EDIT: Btw, going a bit ON topic (lol, sorry) , in my opinion, the main thing is out of question, here. IMO not a debate on if the Linux market is big enough (looking at global world stats, is way smaller that I thought, simply the community is very active and expansive. I would like it to be much a higher %, of course, I really like Linux) . But the direction of not doing a Linux version, is just a matter of resources. IMO the actual focus on making 3 enormous scope applications with a small team/company for even two quite different operating systems, is already vastly ambitious. Specially as as we see in the forums, people are coming to the alternative with expectations high as the sky, coming from having used latest iterations of a pair of graphic suites with decades of  production, bug fixing, feedback, and like 100 times more money and resources. I mean, IMO nothing personal, just human/physic limits...Is already impressive what is already been done, I do believe a lot of people are not able to detect it...(deeply)

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Official important stuff for Windows install and Aero. |  My Aero tips. |  Old inking trick/tutorial, ported from its usage in older applications.

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The linux Snap packages have eliminated much of the problem of developing for various distros. Perhaps if Serif were to consider Linux as part of a wider plan for Chrome OS (which is also linux based) it would make everything much more economical?

@SrPx, I meant linux can be colour-managed lol. Also that other prevalent myth of linux lacking usability is getting old. All the current desktop environments - Gnome, Unity, Elementary's environment, Mate to name a few - all focus on improving usability.

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I have been a Mac user since 1989 (and was a DOS and Windows user before that).

Also, I already "test-drived" some flavors of Linux.

 

That being said, I lost count (and now I mostly ignore) the many, many times that Windows and Linux users said that their OS was the best and that Mac OS would die out.

 

Most Windows users that switch to Mac OS (for personal or professional reasons), never want to go back.

 

Linux users like that Linux is so fast and free. Well, as a freelancer, the FREE part attracts me a lot. But there just aren't professional viable options. I need a specific set of professional tools to be able to do my work and they simply don't exist in Linux. Running a virtual machine in Linux just to have those apps when I can easily have them running native on Mac OS is not an option.

 

So, Linux is nice. But not for everyone. Specially for professionals in some areas that require specific tools.

 

True,

 

It's also true many Mac users are switching to Windows when it comes to 3d, especially lately with the GPU renderer engines.

I'm sure you, as a C4D user, are well aware of this ;)

 

Just adding my 2 c., I don't love/hate anything in particular, I've used both Mac and Win for years and I believe whatever fits the user's needs is the platform to go.


Andrew

 

---

Windows 7 Professional 64-bit SP1

Dual Intel Xeon E5 v2 @ 2.10GHz Ivy Bridge-EP/EX 22nm Technology

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I'd pay for a linux version. (and I signed up just to say that)

 

I'm a web developer/designer with three desktops (linux,linux,windows) and two laptops (linux,os x) between work & home.

 

The one machine still encumbered by windows is a family desktop for adobe software and games. The games issue is almost resolved - steam are pushing linux now.

 

Mac isn't a serious option for me. Hardware at twice the price with restrictions? Haha good one.

 

Please help me ditch Microsoft.

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I'd pay for a linux version. (and I signed up just to say that) /\


 

I'm really interested in your software. They have great market potential as they would not have any competition on Linux.

 

They already have my mail! I hope someday this will come true.  :D

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I would absolutely love a linux version of Affinity Photo, and would buy a few copies for the company i work for. We are a VFX house and Image Editing is a big reason we need Windows boxes around.

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The linux Snap packages have eliminated much of the problem of developing for various distros. Perhaps if Serif were to consider Linux as part of a wider plan for Chrome OS (which is also linux based) it would make everything much more economical?

 

 

 

oh man would i love a chrome OS version.

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I want it in my Nintendo 64.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

// Joke.

stokerg, MattP, Ben and 1 other like this

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Official important stuff for Windows install and Aero. |  My Aero tips. |  Old inking trick/tutorial, ported from its usage in older applications.

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I'm a Windows user, but have handled quite the 3. The 3 of them are really good.

 

I agree. The discussion seems to be near-presidential in terms of emphasizing the bad.

 

Over the years, I have used all 3 too. They each have their strengths and weaknesses.

 

MacOS is pretty media/design-centric. Being that, things you want in that area are easy. But it comes with a closed ecosystem and it doesn't (legally) run on your free choice of hardware.

 

Windows is more open in that regard, but I cannot seem to color manage to a wider gamut without the Windows UI becoming unbearably saturated and lacks the built-in RAW profile and codec support.

 

Linux is totally free in every regard and a true pleasure to work with for developers, but media-related things that are simple in the other OSses, are (still) quite spartan in Linux.

 

 

So, Linux is nice. But not for everyone. Specially for professionals in some areas that require specific tools.

 
As professional developers, we use Linux 95% of the time. The other 5% is reluctantly booting Windows to use Affinity and Adobe products. Affinity pricing is more realistic for people who don't use the products 40 hours per week. We can't get rid of Adobe's arrogant pricing scheme just yet for depending on InDesign and After Effects. In time I hope we can get rid of our dependency on Adobe. That's step 1.
 
Step 2 is getting rid of our dependency on Windows and being able do to everything within Linux.

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I too worked (for many years) in a sort of developer and also system administration company. I needed to have constant access to Linux machines, half of my software connected to linux services, even using ported linux applications, (for tunneling, etc) . Often VNC to a machine in other room for testing all my front end work in a Mac. You know how it's been a royal nightmare specially some years ago the differences among platforms in how the advanced and basic things did render in each browser and platform. Things are a bit easier now, but complicated again with the need of responsive designs, too complex and heavy frameworks, grid systems, platforms of conditional css power like "Less", and for a traditional UI designer, another mountain (UX) of very new stuff than what our designers' profile probably (this is a very personal opinion!) should reach... )  . My point is... In this today's scenario, with complexity of tech or artistic professions, profiles (probably I'd say just tech, as is the only option left even to do your art)  skyrocketing in terms of complexity of new stuff to learn , I'd totally understand professionals of today not willing to do many "experiments" to add complexity, limitations and difficulty to the already hard and complex equation.

 

As an example, a designer is requested in many job offers to be expert in the mentioned UX (includes statistics studies, information management, marketting and a lot more stuff), html, css, Less, javascript, SEM/SEO, heavy frameworks and grid systems, and I've even seen the requirement of Backend, too! (yeah, really) . In the 90s and early 2000 years, usual request was just to be a graphic designer mastering the Adobe suite (usually AI and PS, page Maker in its days, then Quark, then ID. For video AE and/or Premiere), with knowledge for print stuff, or web (even rarely was expected to have graphic tool knowledge for both media!. And that was it. IMO, the less that a today's general IT or graphic worker wishes is extra limitations and complexity... Indeed, I checked this fact with many colleagues, practically all workers in places I've been at. And only in the last one, were the 99 % were picked being handling and liking Linux a primordial requirement, makes an exception. All the other mates were all : Thanks, not linux in my desktop. Maybe at home. In what is graphics area, mostly. In servers stuff was almost always the opposite situation. So, indeed, you can see clearly my conclusion:  Yeah, Linux is the king of servers, but there's  whole world out there apart from servers, and users need it (ie: graphics production at really serious levels. IMO, Blender is the one in a better position for that race, already on top on too many things, despite most users not being brave enough to reach and discover that level )

 

The other crucial front : Libre Office. If want to get users, in the OS, just give power to the guys behind that, make that package "talk" to MS Office like if it were its much loved cousin, and 'now we're talking', like they say. IMO, for users of a level of flexibility (I do have that, thankfully) Libre Office is already there (like Blender, Thunderbird,  Firefox, Wings3D (and Inkscape for non professional printing)). But is not for all the other family members except one. And just because my sister is a bit freaky, like me. The others, will stop at the first Excel import issue, or not finding some key feature or button in their day by day usage. Sad, but people is so. I will never ever understand why stop there, and give the brain some activity, but life is so.

 

That is: Yep, Linux is great, totally. I feel great using KDE desktop (I like Gnome too, but prefer KDE) , but, even if is in those "small" details that insistingly the Linux community seem to consider irrelevant, evil is in the details.  I've read too many times in many points of the documentation, in forums, even in blog articles of important members defending the fact that CMYK color mode and color profiles are "not a high priority", while usually being a so KEY matter in any printing related workflow. In a DESIGN software !. I mean... what the... ?  ...  :?  This would have no importance, or could be forgiven/compensated (after all Inskcape has an amazing flexibility and good learning curve) if it were some other feature. I mean, ok, for example, if Inkscape wouldn't have a trace feature -which it has- or simply, some other A. Illustrator's are not yet present in Inkscape (brushed related, all the expand features matter, etc), those I can manage to use other tools to end up with a similar result, after all. But no cmyk color profiles, no good attention to all related to working in that color mode in that software... Things are changing and evolving more sanely lately (maybe they are realizing the importance of such matter), but some important matters related to printing, are still set too far long in the road map. Krita instead, have considered it since the beginning. But is not a vectorial package. Sk1 Illustration software is, and does give it its importance, since the start. But development goes extremely slow and I got tired to wait to see appearing a Windows version. Going farther...vector animation... you only have Synfig...a good tool, but far from what Animate CC (the old Flash Animator, renamed) allows you to do professionally. or even as a hobbyist ! In Windows, there's quite more options and much more powerful.

 

In video, though, like in 3D is a bit different. I know many good, and well going video studios doing VERY well using Linux video editors, and using Blender 3D for the 3d part... Even often for video compositing (Blender has a video editor inside). Still, IMO, feature to feature, still more power in Windows/Mac.  BUT...the price/cost is such an important factor, that they managed to do custom coded workflows, and maintain themselves very competitive and sustainable through the years. Is one of the cases where the more powerful software has not been the best answer for all cases. They have mounted studios with a small fraction of the usual needed money. And full companies doing 3D services. IMO quite a harder road than just having in your machine AE, Premiere, Max, Maya, Vray and the ton of great other video editors in the market for win and mac.

 

Because... that's an interesting other matter. Now many Linux users are realizing that for graphic work, the situation is quite richer in Windows and Mac. Because, due to they finally realized the situation (the mass of users in Windows and Mac), they finally ported many Linux only apps to Windows. But during very long time, the port to Windows was seen as evil. Still is, by many. So... why now there should be a better treatment in the other direction, for giving support to Linux, when windows ports in linux based groups or companies have been always left as a last thing for linux developers, even finally ported or compiled by some external windows user, and almost always been a quite older software version ?  The groups or companies that understood all this being silly are the ones triumphing now : Blender, Firefox, Libre Office, etc, do have mac and windows ports, always the last stable version, and supported officially.

 

Anyway, IMO is just a matter of percentage of users. Look for really reliable sources. The proportion is.. huge.. Windows and Mac have the market, is way too obvious to deny it, very specially for graphical applications.

 

I would like to see the day when that is different. been decades wishing so since my first taste of a Redhat 4 and old Slackware versions I installed even with floppy disks. Being an avid Blender(GPL) and Wings3D (BSD license) user in ALL my 3D professional work, Krita as my painter, Gimp for certain editing, I could totally "survive" with only those, if suddenly Microsoft and Apple went bankrupt (lol). BUT... My professional activity would see a slow down, and having to make a lot of high end feature based tasks with tricks. Which I have known and learned using those apps for many years. But in my pro activity, that difference could be terribly critical. Often the difference to be able to take an extra gig, or even achieve what was required, is in one of those "just details" that a lot of Linux users seem to see as "not so important".

 

IMO, from an user point of view, I mean, someone just browsing, using Libre Office (compatible wit MS Office till some point, and extremely powerful, I use it instead of MS's even being Windows my only system.) , VLC (which is extremely good) for all video playback, Cinelerra, and the bunch of free editors in Linux for your usual Youtube video editing, Gimp, etc, yeah, for that, you can already trash Windows, if your "soul" really needs to. Mine does not but could do if I wasn't a professional using my pc for that. Now, for a hobbyist taking it a bit seriously, and much more, for a professional, a freelancer, or remote worker of some sort (as in-house in a company you usually are forced to use what they use)  , it still has a medium/long way to go. Here's hoping the difference is shortened. Because IMO, ALL users, including Mac and Windows users, would terribly benefit from Linux getting on par with professional graphic tools. Just like I believe that if Affinity's tools get established as a really very solid alternative to CC (I firmly believe it will be the case, except for CC extreme fans or simply companies very dependent to very specific native psd format details and specific  CC workflows )   this, funnily, has a strong potential to benefit greatly CC users ! Yep. Competition always allows that. The winners wouldn't be the users (but the large monopolies and their investors) when a new competitor doesn't reach an ok enough level to compensate the loss of features with the amazingly better purchase conditions, if it does not happen WE ALL WILL LOOSE, trust me. CC would have no threat at all, can raise prices as they'd wish, can do whatever. With competition, there's an escaping pod ... CC users would probably see a better treatment, more substancial updates, even who knows if a suscribe system modification or purchase alternative. (much cleverer and user friendly alternatives are practicable, like Allegorithmic products able to purchase by a rent to own system, that can be even paused and retaken. How can it be more indy -friendly ) So that's why I don't understand software wars neither OSes wars (same conclusion). We get benefit from having a certain number of competitors being almost equally strong. Me, almost always preferring the affordable price despite having to use a bit more my brain. Healthy thing to do, anyways.  But still, the tools need the minimum essentials for professional work.


Freelance Illustrator, comic artist, graphic designer, 3D modeler, animator (2D/3D), texturer, graphics UI specialist, web designer (+ html/css), oil painter, pixel artist.

 

Official important stuff for Windows install and Aero. |  My Aero tips. |  Old inking trick/tutorial, ported from its usage in older applications.

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Same here, I only created an account on the forum to say there is a real market for a Linux version.

Having managed in the past a medium size VFX studio in the past having to stick with windows just for Photoshop and Zbrush is such a pain I would have gladly paid 4 time the price to get rid of all the Adobe crap. No floating licenses, no support...

I am now working in one of the biggest VFX company of the world, and we have literally hundreds of artists that need a secondary machine + KVM for freaking photoshop, as Linux is the standard OS for every major and medium company. Even if you were to sell the Linux version for 500$ it would still be far less than all the time and complexity and hardware currently involved.

 

All of the major CG piece of software were developed on linux first to meet the needs of big studios: Maya, Houdini, Nuke, Katana, Mari, Arnold, Renderman etc... If that many software companies went full linux first for this "niche market" it is probably worth it.

 

Go for a kickstarter if you want to test the waters before investing anything.

 

Unless this has nothing to do with economics...

chrisoffner3d and Disper like this

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I'm a windows user for more than a decade. 
I'm using linux for about 5 years.
I'm using macOS for almost 2 years. 

Personally, I like the linux most but due to software limitation I also use the other two (macOS at work and windows at home).
I registered only to give +1 to this post and share with you some thoughts. In my opinion linux have a big potential, even though the user base is smaller but also there is a niche for professional tools for designers.

Please at least consider a crowdfunding action for a linux version. Either you would silence those like me who are hoping for a linux version, or you would raise enough money to make it happen. Isn't this a win/win for you? 
 

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