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Affinity products for Linux

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-- Edited --- (by me, SrPx)


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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has anyone tried an emulation yet with the Vulkan-based DX11 layer for wine?
https://github.com/doitsujin/dxvk/wiki


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Affinity Team please compiles a Linux Version. Adobe was the only Software what hold me back to switch to Linux. I have to use always a Virtual Machine for my Web Dev, now I switch to Affinity because of the Cloud shxx from Adobe.
But even here the Community can't understand the freedom of choice using different Destributions. Its look like there is no hope at this point, befor the Management itself don't understand what movement they cloud start by supporting Linux.

It would help even if wine could be supported by using mono instead dotnet.

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just adding some information to the discussion :)
I am linux user for more than 15 years, but I always had to have windows on some PC due to some softwares.

Particularly I believe that this question of marketing share and number of users focused on graphic works is a cultural stigma. For example, designers of any category use or have used adobe packages. Adobe does not provide its programs for linux distributions, so these users do not use linux. The same goes for some other popular software in the area. But this is also a reflection of the stigma that linux carries, both historically and also by some extremist users.
Linux was marked as something for "nerds" (as mentioned in the discussion kkk), difficult to use. Currently this has changed, distributions like Ubuntu, Mint, Manjaro, Deepin and Fedora are clear examples of this. But still we (linux users) suffer with some weaknesses in our beloved penguin. A good example is the compatibility with video cards (VGA) that hardly perform better than windows. The same thing happens with several softwares that often have no interest in developing for this platform. I particularly understand, I get annoyed, but I understand.

Employ time and staff to develop for a system with these problems.
I particularly turn well with the software available today, but I would like to have more options instead of being "forced" to use windows because of some software. Sometimes I have to turn a MacGiver to make some things work like a tablet.

I understand you for not having an interest in developing for linux, I hope someday change your mind, for now I will invest in who invests in me.

PS: sorry about my english  :)

 

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On 4/9/2018 at 0:15 PM, mondze said:

Affinity Team please compiles a Linux Version. Adobe was the only Software what hold me back to switch to Linux. I have to use always a Virtual Machine for my Web Dev, now I switch to Affinity because of the Cloud shxx from Adobe.
But even here the Community can't understand the freedom of choice using different Destributions. Its look like there is no hope at this point, befor the Management itself don't understand what movement they cloud start by supporting Linux.

It would help even if wine could be supported by using mono instead dotnet.

I second that! I am a molecular biologist working in academia, and I use Linux for virtually all my work, with an exception of graphics design. I would love to uninstall Windows and stop wasting my hard drive space and computational resources; but the lack of professional, stable, and easy to use graphics software (such as the Affinity Designer) is preventing me from removing this horrible system.

I also agree with fredericofavaro, developers make apps for the system that is most popular, and it is most popular because it has the apps. Most of the scientific software in my area of expertise is written for Linux (often it is extremely difficult/impossible to compile it on macOS), and I am quite sure that this will be the same for other disciplines of science. However, research generates only all the knowledge that we require for progress and development; while computer games, marketing campaigns, creative accounting etc. generate immediate profit.   

I understand that developers will never make a Linux version, because supporting two platforms is already a huge endeavor. IMHO this problem will exist until we solve this ridiculous problem of having 3 main software platforms that are not inter-compatible. Me guess is that the waste of resources caused by this alone is mind-blowing, people have to reinvent the wheel all the time, and we end up with three octagons that brake all the time, instead of one solid wheel.

Devs, will you prove us wrong? Please....? ;)

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-- Edited --- (by me, SrPx)


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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I have been a heavy photoshop user from before the CS versions and I final jumped over to finally get away from Windows and go to Linux.

Adobe was always my main reason for sticking to windows but hey! I can accept to become a dual booter and/or use wine a lot more. (not that Adobe works really well with wine)
Just today I simply stumbled across Affinity and it looks really good. Truly I don't understand why our price point is this low. And I fully understand why you think you can make the jump to Linux. But you can't make a business case out of questions on people asking for it. so in order to help me and my fellow linux creatives I just want to poin to the easiest way to test a business case that at the same time is great PR for your product for Windows and OSX: ever thought of setting up a kickstarter campaign for a linux version of the software...? There have been a number of successful software kickstarts and you have it way easier as you already have a great product to show of you just need time to sit down and actually calculate how difficult is would be and set a campaign goal. You might be surprised that Linux users are not as cheap as you think they are. Hey I pay adobe £49 every month.. but won't be doing that for long now I found you guys. 

Just wanted to share my thoughts.

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36 minutes ago, Sjak said:

I have been a heavy photoshop user from before the CS versions and I final jumped over to finally get away from Windows and go to Linux.

Adobe was always my main reason for sticking to windows but hey! I can accept to become a dual booter and/or use wine a lot more. (not that Adobe works really well with wine)
Just today I simply stumbled across Affinity and it looks really good. Truly I don't understand why our price point is this low. And I fully understand why you think you can make the jump to Linux. But you can't make a business case out of questions on people asking for it. so in order to help me and my fellow linux creatives I just want to poin to the easiest way to test a business case that at the same time is great PR for your product for Windows and OSX: ever thought of setting up a kickstarter campaign for a linux version of the software...? There have been a number of successful software kickstarts and you have it way easier as you already have a great product to show of you just need time to sit down and actually calculate how difficult is would be and set a campaign goal. You might be surprised that Linux users are not as cheap as you think they are. Hey I pay adobe £49 every month.. but won't be doing that for long now I found you guys. 

Just wanted to share my thoughts.

Great idea! Count me in.

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1 hour ago, Sjak said:

... ever thought of setting up a kickstarter campaign for a linux version of the software...?

This has been mentioned several times in this very long topic already. Serif has said they are not interested in that, in part because it isn't just about the development costs, & in part because crowd funding does not fit their business model.

 

Perhaps you folks that keep asking for a Linux version should spend a little more time reviewing what they have already said before posting here....


Affinity Photo 1.7.3, Affinity Designer 1.7.3, Affinity Publisher 1.7.3; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.3.155 & Affinity Designer 1.7.3.1 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iPadOS 13.1.2

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On 26/4/2018 at 4:29 PM, R C-R said:

This has been mentioned several times in this very long topic already. Serif has said they are not interested in that, in part because it isn't just about the development costs, & in part because crowd funding does not fit their business model.

 

Perhaps you folks that keep asking for a Linux version should spend a little more time reviewing what they have already said before posting here....

 

Oh, c'mon ! Who actually reads in 2018 !!!  that's so 2006..... 


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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Hello All, I'm new here :)

For the story I switched from Adobe since they go to cloud licences, killed Fireworks and made photoshop so heavy I need to upgrade my computer each years...I was really desesparated to find an alternative to and a day Affinity Photo coming ! Thanks you ! For the past I was Beta tester of TVPaint (since amiga golden days) and made plug-ins for. I'm now CG Teacher in Film / VFX in the biggest Belgium CG College, since I show Affinity to my students many of switched from Photoshop to Affinity...

In VFX Industries we work on LINUX, why? No licences for OS, stability, no forced updates, better memory management etc and we have all our softwares on Linux (Houdini, Nuke, Fusion, DaVinci, Maya, 3D-Coat, Clarisse, Modo, Substance, Unity, Unreal,...) but we still don't have pro images softwares and sorry but Gimp and Krita is not at the level of Affinity or Photoshop...Today Linux is growing more and more in VFX market since Microsoft release a playschool OS called Windows 10, this is not an OS but a Store with so much garbage, Telemetry, forced updates, bugs, OS in cloud,... Does microsoft realise they sales a Windows 10 Pro with such garbage as Candy Crush, Disney Magical, Paint3D,...??? Ok for Familly edition but not for the Pro market... Windows 10 is focusing on conssumers market, tablet, Windows store and forget Pro!

If a day Adobe release Photoshop over Linux it's the end of Windows 10 for Pro...

This is why we migrate more and more on Linux, so there is a market to take.

Regards,

BSM

Note: sorry for my bad english writing.

 

 

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Edited (as always, by me, SrPx, not mods) long explanation on why Win 10 IS (indeed) professional --  Ok, there's no point in the talks about this, here. Roger out. (fully)


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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Windows 10 is truly "professional" - if you don´t dare to use professional equipment like a Wacom tablet and want to draw within Photoshop...
https://www.reddit.com/r/Windowsink/comments/8508fi/controlling_pen_behavior_in_windows_10

Guess those which use wacom tablets in conjunction with Photoshop on Windows systems are not considered professionals anymore?? ;)

 


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I second that Windows 10 is the worst OS to date. Even if I wished to have privacy I simply couldn't get it, updates are usually either breaking or removing existing stuff that worked well or just rendering computers useless. I had two machines with Windows 10 die because of updates that failed and I am the guy who usually fixes these machines. I ended up just installing Windows 7 one one where I just couldn't live with just Linux and on the other one (my main laptop computer) I ended up installing Ubuntu and Windows 7 in a VM. And it's working perfectly. LibreOffice is working great with Office formats, Firefox handles the Web just fine. There is a native Telegram client, VMWare just works with Windows 7 and Ubuntu to get my PCB CAD programs and Affinity working, but it's only half a success. Affinity would run a lot smoother natively so would the PCB CAD tools.

Linux has, finally reached a point, where all my drivers are detected automatically and are just working. I am typing this on that very ThinkPad and everything is working. Cellular, WiFi, the trackpoint, the camera, the NVidia graphics chip (with the proper driver), battery, keyboard, DVD, SSD, Ethernet, USB3. It's amazing what the open source community (paid or unpaid) created and they are certainly part of a future where people take care about keeping hardware for more than two years and start caring about their privacy again. I would be happy to pay 150€ for a license of Ubuntu (if applicable) for what I get and for the freedom I enjoy. And in fact, I have donated to them for using Ubuntu as my main OS (still an experiment for me) on my main machine.

Having more tools available cross-platform would be amazing. Being a developer myself, I tend to use intermediate languages to keep my software working on the major three. There are tools that can't be free such as a decent CAD/photo/video editor. They could optionally be open source though. In any way should they work on the major three platforms. I don't like Inkscape or KiCad too much. They have bugs, the UI is horrible and hard to get the head wrapped around, because so many people have different beliefs in what works the best and there is a lack of structure. Gimp is at the edge of being a nice tool. On the other hand, Blender does a good job for what it is.

Even the game development industry is starting to take Linux seriously with more and more titles being released for all three platforms (which is happening because the major engines are developed to support all three).

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Windows 10 tipped the balance to force me from Windows 7 to OSX.     It's just so ugly.

 

One major reason the high end 3D world is in linux is because they can hook up 100's of machines in parallel.  

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30 minutes ago, bmuessig said:

I second that Windows 10 is the worst OS to date.

 

I agree with that.

 

Trying to run it on a laptop is a joke. I took my laptop into an office where it logged on to the internet via wi-fi and downloaded one of it's many pointless "upgrades". It was four hours before it would switch off !!!  I am using windows 7. Much better.

 

The problem with Serif porting Affinity to Linux is that everybody would almost certainly end up with an inferior product. On Windows and Mac the resources would stretch Serif so that the bug fixes and upgrades would certainly take longer, making it harder for them to compete with Adobe and satisfy Photoshop users who want to switch, losing sales.. On Linux, professional photographers would miss out on the many Windows or Mac add-ons. Like green-screen (chromakey) software and plug-ins, DAMs and many drivers. I have three printers, including a photographic dye-sub that just wont run on Linux. I don't know what the situation would be with RAW files and cameras.

 

I am sure Serif have looked at the possibility of taking on more staff but this sort of thing is not easy. Only they know the feasibility.

 

If you are that desperate to run Affinity, buy a second-hand Windows 7 PC and run it alongside a Linux machine. It works fine. You can even get a keyboard / monitor / mouse switcher. The best of all worlds.

 


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

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Just now, toltec said:

 

I agree with that.

 

Trying to run it on a laptop is a joke. I took my laptop into an office where it logged on to the internet via wi-fi and downloaded one of it's many pointless "upgrades". It was four hours before it would switch off !!!  I am using windows 7. Much better.

 

The problem with Serif porting Affinity to Linux is that everybody would almost certainly end up with an inferior product. On Windows and Mac the resources would stretch Serif so that the bug fixes and upgrades would certainly take longer, making it harder for them to compete with Adobe and satisfy Photoshop users who want to switch, losing sales.. On Linux, professional photographers would miss out on the many Windows or Mac add-ons. Like green-screen (chromakey) software and plug-ins, DAMs and many drivers. I have three printers, including a photographic dye-sub that just wont run on Linux. I don't know what the situation would be with RAW files and cameras.

 

I am sure Serif have looked at the possibility of taking on more staff but this sort of thing is not easy. Only they know the feasibility.

 

If you are that desperate to run Affinity, buy a second-hand Windows 7 PC and run it alongside a Linux machine. It works fine. You can even get a keyboard / monitor / mouse switcher. The best of all worlds.

 

Thanks for your kind answer.

I agree with you that it's hard for Serif to push out updates for all three. The good thing with Linux is that the unixoid nature of both OSes would make porting the core very easy. On the other hand, the GUI would be a lot more problematic.

I am currently just running Windows 7 in a VM on Ubuntu (Linux) which works very well. I don't have to give up much harddisk space for Windows, don't have to give up my privacy since Windows only runs when I choose to (and I can disable the VM's internet if I choose to) and use the shared folders to exchange data. In fact, it's running extremely well. The Windows VM is booting in a few seconds and in Windows, I have configured My Documents and My Pictures to be hardlinked to that shared folder, so all data created on Linux is useable in Windows and vice-versa.

This means I can do Web-development on Linux and do the graphics editing in another Windows VM window. It's not very inconveniant but it could be better.

Driver support in Linux is great, but especially for scanners and printers it can be varying. Getting completely rid of Windows is not possible, but restricting it to a VM is certainly possible. Once support for Windows 7 and 8.1 run out, I will be off that sinking ship and I will only run Windows 7 in an isolated VM, where it most likely won't catch any viruses but still run my Windows-only programs.

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Quote

The good thing with Linux is that the unixoid nature of both OSes would make porting the core very easy.

Humm.... performance... tho not so noticeable for just web graphics, of course.... (in print stuff, large files, and unrelated, but also for 3D software....not so nice, all that. )

I've used that method before. In total, have used : windows (xp and 7) in Vm in Linux, Linux in a VM in Windows, multi boot (reaching 2 distros and 2 different versions of windows at a time), remote controlling a mac, a windows and several linuxes, and having just two machines and a file server)

Quote

The good thing with Linux is that the unixoid nature of both OSes would make porting the core very easy.

Not so sure about that.

Anyway, problem is specialized human resources. Is already a prob with "just" 2 platforms...And this should be understood. Is an issue in every open source project, too. Recently I read one of the probs in Gimp, compared to Krita, is that though in Gimp there are now 3 active developers (and 2 in GEGL, I think I read), there's no project manager, nor anybody to handle stuff which is not merely programming, and kind of stuff like, for example, maintain, promote and etc kickstarter projects.  While krita, with probably less developers, have that ironed. In both, the issue is the same: not being able to have more people full time coding. Is not very different in a commercial company ! But also people need to understand that a company's main roadmap and own main path, are things they decide on their own... (IMO). And that there many be further complications when it is a commercial company. We simplify stuff here a lot, you surely know what I mean if having worked at a software developer company, sit in a meeting with investors, etc, etc.


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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This is rock solid llvm compiler, generating Intermediate code, run by Cling interpreter. Cling - the C++ interpreter - it's part root CERN framework and like python, can be use for rapid Affinity product development.

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