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I am UI/UX designer and I need vector software with assets and artboards to create responsive layouts of websites and mobile apps. I cannot find good Linux tool for this. Inkscape... No. Sometimes there are tons of screens (artboards) in my files.

 

If you are on Linux, and you need a good UI design tool with artboards support, give Figma a wirl. Also, Gravit seems pretty good too for a vector app - combine both, and you can work on Linux. Although both will be browser-based, and you will have to be online. Then again, this enables you to switch seamlessly between machines, and share work with your colleagues. Figma has a nice collaboration mode as well.

 

https://www.figma.com

https://gravit.io

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Thanks, but Affinity is much more comfortable tool for us. And our NDA does not allow to upload non-finished works to anywhere except of our backup data server.

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Plus if, as you pointed out, there are no professional graphic design programs on Linux, then it is fair to say that there are no professional designers using Linux, to design at least.

Well, there is the chicken/egg analogy. You could argue that there are no professional designers using Linux because there is no professional software. Perhaps there would be many designers using Linux if the existence of professional software would make it attractive enough? Sometimes the supply determines the demand, not vice versa. The same argument can be brought up for public transportation: if people are using their cars because no public transportation is existing, how can you know whether people will or won’t switch unless you first establish a supply?

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moonjasper,

 

I can appreciate your and other Linux enthusiasts' enthusiasm but your own quote actually hurts the case for bringing Affinity's products to Linux. "there is no professional graphics software in Linux" begs the question of why doesn't Adobe, quite possibly one of the money-grubbingest companies out there, make their software for Linux? Surely if there is even a small profit to be made, Adobe would do it. Adobe has lots of programmers, lots of extra cash to throw at such a project so why haven't they done it? The answer is, because the return isn't worth the effort or they would have done it by now and sure enough as soon as it is worth it, they will. 

 

"but thousands of designers all over the world regularly ask developers to release one"-if there are only a few thousand designers who would be interested in using Linux, it isn't a big enough of a market to support the cost of porting the software to Linux. Plus if, as you pointed out, there are no professional graphic design programs on Linux, then it is fair to say that there are no professional designers using Linux, to design at least. If I lived in a country with no cats, it wouldn't make much sense to sell cat food there, would it?

 

I hope that Linux continues to mature and evolve but Linux has a long ways to go.

blackmagic at least did it just recently https://forum.affinity.serif.com/index.php?/topic/3353-multi-linux-seriously-now/?p=182100


 

 

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Yes. There are some cross-platform applications for media, VFX and 3D design. But there is no tool for UI/UX design. There is only few tools (only one exactly except of LaTEX) for desktop publishing.

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 You could argue that there are no professional designers using Linux because there is no professional software. Perhaps there would be many designers using Linux if the existence of professional software would make it attractive enough?

 

 

I have quite a strong suspect that the reason why there's not too much high end graphic software in Linux is more due to a large base of Linux developers being since day one more concerned about programming/network/administration/system/social/security related tools. That together with facts like... Doing graphic software is a daunting task, which involves a lot of issues, hardware drivers and hardware support (one of the probs in the old times in Linux), and that a lot of proprietary, non-free stuff  (libraries, etc) is needed, in many cases, to create those.

 

Is not just that simple as the chicken/egg analogy. If anything, there's a very hard to beat issue, and is market dominance, something that is an issue for any software, even based in Windows. So, is more of a established brand (Adobe and Autodesk, mostly) and a bazillion work-flows and companies working with the dominant suites totally forming part of the companies' DNA, now. Even if Affinity (for example), or Corel, or Xara, were to beat them with a BETTER (and surely cheaper) product, which is such a task, most companies could not -for a while- trash Adobe suite. Just like other companies have a very complex situation if have to move from using Maya, because all their internal work is based on Maya's Mel Scripting, plugins (some even made in-house) hard worked out through many years, shaders, etc. This happens with PS, AI, and some other graphic software applications. Is not impossible, and some houses are making it.

 

But the mass... convincing them all to do so... pretty complex. So much that even if expecting the best case scenario, that this 2% of the global OSes market share would have their users all buying Affinity tools  (as if everyone in the Linux world were artists... Not the case...) that'd mean nothing to change the situation : That the main suites will keep dominating with a 91% (or whatever the real number is...) and a 7% (or more, and happy design software customers) as a much better chance that the small other user base. The main brands will be there in the top no  matter what (Adobe, Autodesk, Microsoft, Apple...) . Of course, people like you and me (or specially me, as I believe you are not a freelance, or not full time at that)  can have the joy of using any other thing but those. But the majority, with their jobs, already extremely hard 12 - 16 hours day job (working in the graphic industry tends to be really hard by itself, (games, marketing, comic, sofware companies, been there, done that ) )  as to had extra obstacles. A freelance still can have flexibility in the software to use, milestones, and procedures. The one at high stress environments, can't add extra problems. While a freelance will do in more cases if saves money and time in the long run. (does not need the boss permission)

 

That last reason, is IMO, the VERY, very first one. Specially when working in games, webmaster, and in certain software developer, you really really don't wont extra time loosing, stop your crazy schedules because the whatever app lacks a feature and you need to "wait" till some open source developer gets in the mood of adding it, uses it as as a Google Summer project, or thesis, etc.  Even so, I insist. There IS already graphic software there in Linux with this "ok let's seriusly attend the professional requirements and do real professional competing software" focus. IMO Blender is by far the very best example, by all means. A lot of people don't know it because its UI is to different to what people know, and this keeps them far (for now.The UI has become much better...). But is indeed really powerful. Krita, for 2D painting, if you use that one seriously, you find your self with a very professional painting solution. Of course, is still too young (like Affinity) , and has corners to polish. But if I am using it professionally, it is then indeed quite there already, as I'm of the picky kind, very demanding with my tools.

 

And one thing that is key is that the actual Linux users would learn to give the value that it has to their great existing applications. A lot of people complaining to Adobe for not making a Linux version, I've talked to many, and most of them confess that they have been unable to make Gimp, Krita, and MyPaint their base tools (90% of them have their brain installed, just didn't care to pass the first difficulty with the tool), or even do anything with them. A power user should be able to make complete use of them. Even to achieve things not possible by default, just doing clever workarounds.

 

So, can't agree that is just : "There is no graphic designers" (I'd expand it to graphic tools users, as the field is huge (designers, game artists, illustrators, comic artists, etc))  "because there's not enough good graphic software in Linux" (I know these are not your exact words, but I got what you meant). The situation is way more complex, has more corners, is not that simple, neither has such a simple solution. Among all the issues I see, I emphasize the fact that for very long -I've been a Blender user in a more serious way since 2002, but have used Linux distributions since the floppy discs times-  Linux community has not cared about graphic software like Windows users always did, and definitely, totally very far from the love put by all Mac community (users and developers), an OS so much inspired by graphic design.  This is a huge factor. Not irrelevant, I can say !

 

The thing is... Well, I am not an UX expert, but yep an old timer in graphic and UI design. I certainly can use a combination of Gimp, Inkscape and Krita to do virtually whatever (and Scribus , for certain projects).  I don't know if your need of multiple art boards is a show stopper or you could do well with a workaround, as the part of your job I don't know (and probably ever wont, as IMO is too far from doing pure graphics, which I prefer) is the UX. I know this new category needs new tools and application support. I only know I have handled to do crazily complex projects with just combining open source. In the past was really hard, but doable. Today it is quite easier.

 

So, is one thing that saddens me a bit to read. Now that we finally -graphic artists, in general-  are getting more attention from Linux community at a whole, as they clearly are finally interested, now that tools like Inkscape and Gimp are growing faster, and Blender is such a serious tool that i don't get  (well, I do...) how don't a bunch of mid/small studios don't start integrating it with a plan of replacing commercial tools in many seats. Just in this exciting moment, I read people saying there is no professional graphic software in Linux ! Is not on par, not equally powerful, but totally professional. Not being equally "featured"  (different from being good)  this should mostly affect only big companies, not individual professionals, (even less to enthusiast hobbyists).

 

I really hope there's a bunch of other artists (well, I know there are, seen renders and models that equal or surpass the quality of many at CG Talk done with the big apps) like me, that are aware of the true capability of Linux (cross-platform, like all those  I did mention here) graphic software.

 

That said, I do know Affinity tools are more "professional compliant" (if that's a thing, lol) in how they address professional requirements more directly, out of the box, requiring no workarounds, and how their UIs do adapt almost seamlessly to the pro UIs of the top dogs. Again, this is critical for big companies. shouldn't be a factor for small studios and independent professionals. (for which IMO, the very best shot by very far, is having ALL these tools installed: Affinity's, Krita, Blender, Gimp, Inskcape. And so you have way less chances to be left alone in the rain in certain project obstacle.    )

 

 

 


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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I think SrPx is probably on the right track as to why it hasn't happened yet. I for one would love Affinity on Linux, and I can think of a few others who would, too.

 

But as far as where to invest resources... it seems like a hard sell, especially when there might be some kind of Android tablet/desktop market surfacing before too awful long. That's where I would allocate resources, I can tell ya that...

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I too would like to see a Linux version of various Windows and Mac apps, but with the current low user numbers (compared to Windows and Mac), it is probably just not worth the effort and time for the involved software companies. Although this is an unfortunate situation for Linux users, we also have to be realistic.

 

Alternatively, as a Linux user you can have access to "professional level" image editing by running either an older Photoshop version or PhotoLine through WINE. 

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I am also for Linux version if feasible. Affinity should not focus much on graphic designers when thinking about Linux, but on 3D artist. There is huge market there, large VfX facilities that are mostly Linux based, including Indie developers/creators. Nowadays app for 3D market are first on Win than Linux. As a matter one of the most expensive apps on VfX market, Nuke, was first developed for Linux, MARI too, so no one can tell that is not profitable. There is gap that could be filled if one has enough vision.

 

But, on other side, I do understand if they are not interested, so I would suggest ppl to invest into Krita kickstarter. It is already gr8 app that can replace a lot of PS already. I think that they have good chances to be Blender of 2d world.

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Problem is, "huge" inside a small market, is not huge. In the other hand, VFX sector is very strong, made of extremely highly specialized pros, many of 'em with quite higher salaries than people more in my fields. Of course there's a bit of everything in every area, too. But a VFX specialist tends to get better salary. So, yeah, IMO is one of the points you could defend better the Linux option, in money terms (although in that sector the 2D single image retouching tool is not the main in the workflow).  BUT...We are talking about very high end software... And often large budgets. IMO, Affinity aims more to professional and hobbyists that work in a more independent way, rather than in large teams (again, it is sure a mixed bag, though). 2D still IMO, and at least every time I have been able to check global specs, has always moved more money. Today, I don't know, (with VR, 3D print, 3D for medicine, and CAD getting so strong, let alone the old champions of games, vfx, TV/film, etc) but stats from very recent years were so (including 2D vectors and raster, stock, media companies, etc). Today, I don't have now handy any recent comparison stats of the two markets, at least considered globally.

 

My bet is 2D (as by itself rather than as a helper for 3D) keeps being very strong, and even read (of course, just an informed opinion, but gurus' opinions can always be arguable, I know ) from a great cad portal, recently, why 2D, in general (written by that person, a CAD specialist) that by a list of very solid reasons, 2D want ever go away, nor even loose importance. 2D inside 3D, but in the 3D market, which I believe you refer too, is also strong, for UI work, texturing (I'm also a 3D pro, I can model, uv map, and texture anything. Even (not top experience level) animate. So is not I'm against 3D. But my own experience : I get a lot less gigs, commissions in 3D than 2D.)  , retouching stills, concept art/story board, etc, etc, it all has a HUGE market, but consider that -again, last time I checked- 2D moves more jobs and money, considered globally (all fields in 2D (vector and raster in many types of business and different uses of it)) is bigger by far.

 

That said, and no matter how professional, high level, and specialized VFX is (which it is quite, in all of that) , is a bit of a niche market. Much more requested in numbers are logos, brochures, banners, fliers, business cards, even powerppoint graphics ( lol), templates, etc, etc than 3D tasks.  Although...of course, there are *tons* of people making logos (even very crappy ones, and without knowledge about it), and very few capable of proper VFX work, sth to really consider, lol...That's why getting commissions is also harder in my field as well, in a way. Is quite a complex, polyhedric issue).

 

   I would suggest ppl to invest into Krita kickstarter. It is already gr8 app that can replace a lot of PS already.

 

 

Indeed a very good suggestion. I will do my self at certain point (and I mean, a large donation, not sth symbolic).  Although it cannot replace in a lot of stuff where Affinity Photo DOES replace PS or similar tools already in much more aspects than Krita, and in those features -and memory handling in Windows, text layers capabilities, other pro features features needed in a general 2D editing in several fields (even if in the painting field, IMO, krita is now BETTER than PS)-,  Krita can do a LOT in general 2D editing (it even imports well a layered PSDs if layer effects were flattened, but AP gets much nearer to the standards needed in a everyday job tasks for a pro, or advanced hobbyist,  doing 2D editing (certainly not painting...YET. ) work.  But yeah, for painting (unless you use a lot of layers and use an under powered machine, as we even got to confirm in a recent thread) Krita absolutely rocks.

Will it get  there ? PROBABLY. I'd say more... "Most surely"; I have been following its progress since early times. And even doing a fraction of what PS or Photo does, to me it is relevant to use Krita instead of any other thing for illustration, for obvious reasons (to anyone who has triggered the app and has even some light knowledge about painting, illustrating or comic creation)
 

My take is going for BOTH. It does not hurt to have A. Photo Installed (and AD) together with Krita, Gimp and Inskcape (Blender is a must for 3D). I have the combo and it's wonderful. Of course, I'm since always in Windows (well, many years in the past in Linux). but if my OS were left with very little software for my graphic production, I wouldn't doubt it one single second, I'd move to Apple or Linux if needed with no hesitation. 

 

I understand that VFX pros can have Linux as their home, rarely needed software not available. But to other fields is not so, by far.

 

Krita IS imo already the Blender in 2D painting, meaning, a tool that you can definitely say that despite the bad mantra that graphic tools have had in Linux in the past, it and Blender ARE pro tools in every sense already. Heck, I do my pro work with both of them !

 

IMO, even for a Linux user, the cost of having a Windows 10 installed in multiboot, or better, in a second machine connected by network (which is btw way a quite common setup, am heading for that very soon) is a so small cost compared to the money you need to invest in a professional monitor, tablet device, hardware in general, and software licenses, when not also other business and freelance costs, which are not small by any stretch, those 140 $ every 5 years , or 10, are a complete joke in comparison. So I get this is more about mixing ideology with your operating system, which tends to be a bad idea.  Sticking to some cliches in 2017 ain't any good... OSes are tools, like apps. have all the apps and tools, and OSes you can afford (even if your main workflow is in one, and some specific tools). They are brushes. In my Fine Art times I had cheap Chinese brushes, expensive Pony hair ones, painted with oils, acrylics, water colors, or if the motive allowed it, pastels, gouache, charcoal. This is not that different. Anything that works fit the bill... It could be a matter of laziness : One feels warm and comfy in the Only OS, but one must be able to learn and adapt to whatever is needed... (OSes, apps, hardware, drawing devices, etc) !

 

Anyway, whatever we say here I suspect has no impact on what the investors -or whoever decides in money terms- decide would be or is the chosen path.

 

I have a 'slight suspicion' that the company has no plans at the moment for it (indeed, is what they have said many times)  but like any software company, does not discard it if the growth at some point is so big that it allows it. But see how the huge giant, the freaking king in 2D that is PS has not even yet got a Linux version, after all these years. true that maybe their code might be hard to port to anything else than Win or Mac, but my biggest bet on it is... They have deeply studied the numbers. If it'd worth it, you would have already a PS for every freaking Linux distro on earth, I can tell you. None of these companies hate profits, lol.

 

Would I like it to be so? HECK YEAH. To be able to just install a free Ubuntu/Debian, etc in the computer of a kid in an undeveloped word, or a 18 year old girl wanting to get into graphic design, and then install a cheapo Photoshop or AP ? Heck yeah.  But not possible if numbers get stalled where they are. In the meantime,  I believe Linux users are a bit not being faithful to the HUGE efforts done by what they already have, by mostly volunteers, apps which might be harder to learn and handle (and somewhat features and completeness limited), but are extremely capable. Blender, Krita, Gimp and Inkscape are in my hands extremely productive (so would be in anyone's), and I am not a linux mega fanboy as I used to be, now,  (but the love for cross platform software and the linux project, never ended) and I find even funny that being a very convinced Windows user, I seem to  have much better grip of those 4 JEWELS than most passionate linuxers... Tired of hearing them say : "Gimp is not usable" or you can't work with Inkscape.... heck, Gimp is a very dense and complete package, and Inkscape is even easier to learn an master than the beast that Illustrator is !


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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Soon Linux users may no longer have a reason to pine for a native Affinity Designer: Gravit is quickly becoming a serious contender. Version 3 is released with page and page template support, text styles, anchors for responsive design work, and improved FX and FX styles.

 

On Gravit's roadmap: a webGL renderer to speed up the viewport, symbols, advanced open type formatting, interactive(!) prototyping tools, animation(!), transitions(!), and states(!), advanced DTP layout features(!), a vector brush, and a bitmap brush mode. The interesting thing is that basic DTP functionality, interactive prototyping and animation tools have been requested many times by Affinity Designer users, but will not be added according to the developers (DTP will be handled by Affinity Publisher). Perhaps Gravit might change their minds a bit?

 

Runs on Linux, Windows, Mac, ChromeOS, any modern browser, and is soon available for both iOS and Android!

 

In it current state it is already quite good, although Designer still leaves Gravit in its dust. Still, the potential it had is now coming to fruition.

 

In short: Gravit seems likely to grow into real competition for Affinity Designer and other commercial illustration tools. And all for... FREE! In their own words:

 

 

we’re actually licensing our engine framework to many many companies that’s how we make the cash and thus can skip any stupid SaaS offers ;-)

 

Interesting times.

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Unfortunately this 'Gravity' can be a good free tool for some hobbysts or single users that have their own workflow and this workflow does not rely on advanced stuff. The only great free application that I know is blender. Very strong community, we use it in company along with other commercial stuff. Making good software = time = money. I don't have a problem with paying unless I cant' afford or the price is not relevant. I wonder how things will go with windows 10. I was forced to upgrade by microsoft from 8.1. Generally I moved all my advanced stuff to linux and only 2d workflow I left on win.

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Windows 10 is really good, don't believe the usual cr4p about it. Linux is great, too. I love both. About Blender being amazing... 200% agreeing...

 

Don't know about Gravit...haven't tested (not sure if very polite to advertise other product, even if free, in a company's product forum... Different is if the product name and conversation is already there, or introduced by one company member... They usually don't complain about that, here, unless excessive spam (have only seen one instance of them complaining)... but this is because the company people here is extremely friendly. In other companies' forums these mentions get banned or deleted (with or without warning)....) . Anyway, I'd really doubt that new one is more powerful and professional than A. Designer is, have serious doubts of that being so... (just as am used to test and use lots of free and commercial tools)


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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Don't know about Gravit...haven't tested (not sure if very polite to advertise other product, even if free, in a company's product forum... Different is if the product name and conversation is already there, or introduced by one company member... They usually don't complain about that, here, unless excessive spam (have only seen one instance of them complaining)... but this is because the company people here is extremely friendly. In other companies' forums these mentions get banned or deleted (with or without warning)....) . Anyway, I'd really doubt that new one is more powerful and professional than A. Designer is, have serious doubts of that being so... (just as am used to test and use lots of free and commercial tools)

 

I wasn't advertising it: only mentioning an alternative that DOES work on Linux (and Chromebooks, for that matter). People here mention Photoshop, Illustrator, Inkscape, Gimp, and other tools all the time as well when it makes sense to compare to Affinity, right?

 

This thread is about porting Affinity to Linux, which is (most probably) never going to happen, and since I also work on Linux machines, I am always on the lookout for promising alternative Linux graphics software. If Affinity Designer would be available for Linux, I wouldn't think twice of using THAT. But Affinity does not work on Linux, so any even remotely promising professional alternative for illustration work is very welcome on Linux in my book.

 

Look, this thread is already nine pages long, so that means there is some interest in the Linux community for good professional level illustration software. I was only "the bearer of good news" in that there is some positive development in that area.

 

I agree that Gravit isn't on the same level (yet) compared to Designer - the roadmap looks quite promising, though. I hope to be using it alongside Designer on my Windows machine.

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The problem with Linux is it's market share. It's not even 2 % of the desktop market so even if 100 % off all Linux users that are interested in Image editing or vector graphics purchased Affinity that would still be a negligible number. What's more Linux users tend to stick to open source and free programs instead of purchasing proprietary software .Nonetheless, being a frequent Linux user I'd definitely welcome a Linux version.

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The problem with Linux is it's market share. It's not even 2 % of the desktop market so even if 100 % off all Linux users that are interested in Image editing or vector graphics purchased Affinity that would still be a negligible number. What's more Linux users tend to stick to open source and free programs instead of purchasing proprietary software .Nonetheless, being a frequent Linux user I'd definitely welcome a Linux version.

 

That 2% might seem small, but you have to realize just how big the desktop market actually is. If 100% of the entire Linux enduser market were to buy the Affinity suite, that'd equate to a good few million licenses sold at least.

 

Though you are right that Linux folks are a fickle bunch, and it's hard to tell exactly how well a proprietary piece of software will do in their scene. Me personally, I'd like to see them do a Linux release. I dabble in it occasionally, and I'd like to see it grow its software library to something a little more on par with Windows as far as choice is concerned. But at the same time, I can understand why they're reticent to do so. It's a difficult market to predict.

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Jetbrains does not seem to have their software on Linux unprofitable, otherwise they would not make all their IDE's on Linux too - event the newest ones (I mean Rider for C#, even closed Early Access Preview was for Linux too). Most of their software requires buying a license. Great piece of software btw.

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That's probably because they're a company that addresses one of the biggest markets in the Linux sphere: programming. That and 3D applications are pretty much guaranteed to make money by selling to professional Linux users.

 

Not to say that a good photo and vector app couldn't make headway on Linux, but it's kind of a chicken and egg problem. There isn't a big scene for photo editing and graphics design on Linux now because it lacks a good selection of programs. But the fact it lacks a good selection of photo editing and graphics design programs means that that scene resides elsewhere, and may not ever consider Linux.

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I, as a front-end developer, would greatly appreciate Affinity Photo for linux. Many of my co-workers would too (we all work on Linux). I think this is a nice market for the Affinity Photo.

And we all have licenses for Webstorm and/or PyCharm.

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I would switch to Linux looong ago if there would be any good graphic design software. You say about 2% of market, but bear in mind that a lot of people are trapped in other systems because of lack of good software alternatives. Just count how often you can read "I would switch if only...". So I'm another one not in those 2%.

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I'd be willing to pay a reasonable fee for a Linux product. I'd suggest a Debian base, as I use Linux Mint. To the end user, my primary customer base, it has a great look and feel for those that are comfortable with Windows.

While the OS is 'free' compared to Windows & other products, it shouldn't be implied that people that use Linux don't pay for their programs.  I develop applications and expect to be paid for my work as well. And since I don't have to have large fees incurred to me for startup apps, as many are open source that can be built upon, in turn my solutions to my customers are often less expensive than comparable Win apps. 

My customers also aren't subject to various Viri that affect Win & Macs.

For what it's worth.... Please figure this into developing a Linux version of your software.

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Maybe Docker would help ease deploy to linux if serif is using it.

I'd greatly enjoy a linux version... So would many 3d artists working in games/films industry.

AP looks really cool, Im waiting for python integration before I buy.

Keep up the good work!

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