GarryP

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About GarryP

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  1. Brilliant. Many thanks for sharing. I would like to bet that you have just saved lots of people a whole boat-load of time and effort.
  2. Who's to say that the cormorant that's by itself is lonely? Maybe the others were acting badly and he's deliberately keeping out of their way. Of the three together, the one with its head down could be in a huff (or crying?) and the other two could be looking wistfully towards the one by itself wishing they could join it again. And the one by itself has a bit of a "talk to the wing 'cos the face ain't listening" attitude about it. Just another way of looking at the situation is all.
  3. Another really great piece of colourisation. I'm sure there will be a lot of museums that could use your skills to give some of their photographic assets a new lease of life for presentations and displays. Oh, and Television companies use this sort of work a lot these days too.
  4. I like the way that the light is still shining through all of the destruction. "The Little Lighthouse That Can." Great stuff.
  5. Very nice. Really like the "making of" video too. I did not realise that the girl was two images with a bit of extra artistic flair added. Great stuff.
  6. Here are some more book covers under the same theme as last time: https://forum.affinity.serif.com/index.php?/topic/43157-various-themed-book-covers/ The general idea of each books is: * Natural Born Keepers - A guide to bee-keeping for the mature person; * Bounder - Gritty tale of one man's obsessive control and extra-marital affairs; * Falling - A community's memories of a well-loved dead friend; * Fresh Start - A young woman finds a new life away from her dysfunctional family. The amount of work that was needed for each cover varied - a bit of basic compositing and some "artistic" messing around here and there - but there wasn't a massive amount done in total. Like the previous bunch, they're all experimental throw-away stuff, but if anyone has any suggestions for improvements I'd be happy to hear about them.
  7. Great work. The face is immediately recognisable but I think the hand looks a bit too elongated. When seen side-on, the distance between the wrist and the start of the little finger is usually shorter than the distance between the start of the little finger and the end of the index finger. (Or does he have unusually big hands and some of the fingers are out of view?) I'm probably being a bit fussy but it just looks a bit weird to me.
  8. Ah, I see, a little bit of intrigue on the cover. Nice.
  9. Very nice. I'm not sure if the fire is coming off the top of the girl's head or is part of the background, and the bottom of the "EUE" looks a bit "washed out" compared to the rest of the title but, apart from that, I like it a lot. This would not look out-of-place on a shelf in my local bookshop.
  10. Kasper-V: Distressing the cover above the text might make a good bit of difference. (Passive Archers listening can be harmful to your mental health.) Alfred: You're welcome about the link. (Yeah, so Joseph Bazalgette was responsible for taking cr*p out of people's homes and Peter Bazalgette is responsible for pumping the cr*p back in!) jer: I don't think £2.7m is too bad for restoring a piece of heritage, especially as the money comes from the National Lottery (participation in which is voluntary). Consider that the annual repair bill - paid by taxpayers - for the Scottish Assembly Building is around £1.6m and that's only been open for about 13 years. (The total repair bill since it was opened is larger than one of the initial estimates for building the thing in the first place.) Or, to put it another way, you can get one Wimbledon winner for the same price as restoring Crossness Pumping Station: https://www.aat.org.uk/news/article/%C2%A327-million-cost-winning-wimbledon(Which one someone thinks is more important is, of course, entirely up to them.)
  11. When it comes to the Victorians I don't think there's such a thing as "over the top". (For people not aware of the Victorians, consider the interior of Crossness Pumping Station: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/travel_news/article-3698938/Who-knew-sewage-stylish-Inside-beautiful-Victorian-Pumping-Station-opened-doors-public-London-s-newest-tourist-attraction.html and that was just the inside of a building that only pumped sewage about!) I was thinking more about the typefaces themselves. I keep thinking they look too "new" but they're the sort of thing that is used on circus posters of the time so that can't be it. I don't know what it is. Probably just ignore me and I'll go quietly mad by myself. I agree, gold is tricky to get just right, especially if it has to have some "heft" on the page. It's easy to get something that looks sort of okay but to get it looking really good is difficult as it needs to reflect some of the colour of what it's near. It's a reflective metal after all.
  12. It's always nice to watch someone who really knows what they're doing create something out of thin air.
  13. Thanks jer but I can't take credit for the base image I used which I got from here: https://pixabay.com/en/father-and-son-happiness-love-2258681/I just messed around with it adding the stars and a colour wash. (For simple throw-away stuff like this I tend to look for a wheel that's already been invented, although it took me a while to find something I liked.) Kasper-V, I like your cover but I'm not too sure about the title fonts. They don't seem quite right but I can't really say why. Maybe something simpler would be more fitting? Or maybe not. Also, the title colour looks a little bit too green to me for some reason but that could just be my monitor (or my eyes). It's got a nice "whimsical" look to it though.
  14. Oh dear, what terrible puns. I like them!
  15. Thanks Kasper-V. I like spoof stuff so I'd be interested in seeing your work when it's done. (Joe basically stole most of the poems off Bert to make some quick cash selling the book in the village shop and Bert's actually in one of them - under the name of "Albert Sprat" - as someone who can't plough straight. He would be horrified.)