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the line/bezier work of Affinity designer

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Hi,

we now use Affinity Designer 1.5.1.43.

 

please advice about the line/bezier work of Affinity designer.

we now confuse to use bezier work.

 

1) we design 2 rings/circles object as attachment:

ask1-bezier work_2 lings-1.png

--> we use 2 of the doughnut cicle mode.

 

2) we did add 2 small cicle to connect 2 big cicle as attachment:

ask1-bezier work_2 lings-2.png

ask1-bezier work_2 lings-3.png

 

3) after export it to .png that connect point will be the gray damage part(blue mark) as attachment:

ask1-bezier work_2 lings-4.png

 

can we integrate that big circle and small circle to one of integration object befer before export?

or can you advice us other step/work for this damage issue?

 

 

and, another work for the painting.

we cannot find which menu and step to paint it 2 big circle object as attachment:

*before paint: ask1-bezier work_2 lings-1.png

*after paint: ask1-bezier work_2 lings-1-paint.png

(we did paint this by another paint client, not use Affinity designer.)

 

can you advice us other step/work for the painting in bezier object?

 

 

post-46154-0-61878900-1486106189_thumb.png

post-46154-0-44435600-1486106190_thumb.png

post-46154-0-91049000-1486106190_thumb.png

post-46154-0-42529600-1486106191_thumb.png

post-46154-0-74518600-1486106202_thumb.png

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Well, there are certainly different ways to do this, but you could try it this way:

  • Create two donut shapes, place accordingly
  • Select both shapes and choose Layer > Geometry > Add
  • Select the Node Tool and delete the inner nodes that define the negative space of the ring shape
  • Put a triangle on top of the ring shape and choose Layer > Geometry > Subtract
  • With the Corner Tool, select all four nodes at the gap you opened, create roundings
  • For the solid version, leave it as it is
  • For the stroked version, remove the fill and apply a stroke

That should work …  :)

Alex

post-1198-0-48978900-1486111396_thumb.png

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Yeah - sorry - what should I say? Unless Serif isn´t able to fix it I´ll stay with Inkscape when clean code is required:

 

Cheers

P.

 

:huh:

 

I think you meant "If Serif isn't able to fix it" or "Unless Serif is able to fix it". ;)


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Not to worry, PixelPest! Many native English speakers fall into the "double negatives" trap.


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Affinity Designer/Photo/Publisher for Windows • Windows 10 Home (4th gen Core i3 CPU)
Affinity Photo for iPad 1.8.4.186 • Designer for iPad 1.8.4.4 • iPadOS 13.6 (iPad Air 2)

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Hi, PixelPest.

 

> Posted Today, 05:42 PM

> Why not use the "pressure" property of the stroke? 

 

I did try it the stroke mode after made a doughnut as your screen shot: PressureProperty.jpg,

but still cannot change to my design shape as your sample of black doughnut using "pressure" small window setup.

 

I adjust my "pressure" small window by 4 points setup as this screen shot:

ask1-bezier work_2 lings-2-paint.png

but, my sample red doughnut does not change as your chape of sample black doughnut.

 

please let us know details of that how do I touch the stroke menu or Fill of Elipse or other.

 

post-46154-0-74930400-1486129733_thumb.png

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Just riffing off of the pressure profile method....

 

I saved as an svg and reduced the points. See image for the steps.

Not too terrible a result.

 

post-12544-0-24525900-1486236110_thumb.png

 

(expand stroke > smooth also works, (although not as well in terms of final # of points), but is much more of a crap shoot when it comes to shape retention.)

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Hi, JimmyJack.
 
> Just riffing off of the pressure profile method....
>  
> I saved as an svg and reduced the points.
 
thanks for it sample.
but, we still ask about how do we make that shape ring as this screen shot: "ring2.png"
please let me see how steps to make this shape ring.
 
 

 

post-46154-0-41746700-1486978670_thumb.png

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Hi thanks.

 

bytheway, 

please let me see detail about more steps of same the sample as open svg and select all nodes and convert........ smooth curve....

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Because the shape is quite trivial I´d draw the 7 points of one half manually with some helper-objects for precise alignment; double, mirror and join curves for an unbeatable low point resolution of 12 points which make it straight into an SVG export file:

 

Cheers

P.

post-28670-0-50024600-1486989913_thumb.png

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Hand draw is often most efficient.

 

10 nodes to define:

 

post-34886-0-72003000-1487011020_thumb.jpg


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Yet another way to do this, using the Corner Tool & some other (quirky) stuff:

post-3524-0-62581800-1487024766_thumb.jpg

 

After creating an unfilled donut with a stroke in step one, in step two I used the Corner Tool on the top four nodes to round the ends. The exact radius does not seem to matter -- one it gets very large the ends are as round as they can get.

 

Even though in step two the donut becomes a curve according to the Layers panel, the Context toolbar still offers the Convert to Curves button, which I did in step three. (quirk 1)

 

In step three the Node tool reveals quirk 2 -- there are now more nodes than needed on the rounded ends. So in step 4, I selected the two 'extra' nodes & deleted them while holding down the Alt/Option key, which (usually & sometimes approximately) preserves the curve of the shape between the two adjacent remaining nodes.

 

In step five, for the two inner mid-point nodes, I used an expression in the Transform panel to move them the same relative distance, in this example "x-8" for the left one & "x+8" for the right one for their x value. (Note that these are literal expressions -- don't add the quotes or px to the text, just these characters.) I adjusted the bottom inside node downward manually using the shift key to constrain it to the vertical to complete the shape.

 

It is a 12 node solution, so not quite as economical as gdenby's 10 node one, but it is reasonably precise & also exports to SVG cleanly, without adding any extra nodes.

ring steps.afdesign


Affinity Photo 1.8.4, Affinity Designer 1.8.4, Affinity Publisher 1.8.4; macOS Mojave 10.14.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
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It is a 12 node solution, so not quite as economical as gdenby's 10 node one, but it is reasonably precise & also exports to SVG cleanly, without adding any extra nodes.

 

Place an appropriate sized object, or guidelines, in the gap. Delete the nodes between the upper and lower ends. Pull the line out till the curve reaches the object placed in the gap. Ta-da! 2 less nodes. What would be fun finding the structure that would get it down to 6 nodes. None at the mid line.


iMac 27" Retina, c. 2015: OS X 10.11.5: 3.3 GHz I c-5: 32 Gb,  AMD Radeon R9 M290 2048 Mb

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Place an appropriate sized object, or guidelines, in the gap. Delete the nodes between the upper and lower ends. Pull the line out till the curve reaches the object placed in the gap. Ta-da! 2 less nodes. What would be fun finding the structure that would get it down to 6 nodes. None at the mid line.

I have tried that (assuming I understand what you did) but comparing the results to what I did shows some differences in the shape of the curve around the ends because there does not seem to be any way to guarantee that the control handles of the nodes adjacent to the pulled out section won't change the shape of the curve, on one or both sides of those nodes. The difference might be small, but zoomed in far enough it is visible.

What would be fun finding the structure that would get it down to 6 nodes. None at the mid line.

 

I suspect that is not possible because there would not be enough of them to control the width at the midline independently of the bottom & top sections ... but if you or anyone else can manage that I would like to see how it is done.


Affinity Photo 1.8.4, Affinity Designer 1.8.4, Affinity Publisher 1.8.4; macOS Mojave 10.14.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 
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I'll give it a go.  :)

 

Looks good, but I don't think it would work if the inside top radii needed to be curved more like in PixelPest's post #5 & the midpoint thickness needed to be adjusted independently of the rest of the shape.

 

There is probably some fancy topological analysis that could determine the minimum number of nodes for this sort of thing but I have no idea how it would work.


Affinity Photo 1.8.4, Affinity Designer 1.8.4, Affinity Publisher 1.8.4; macOS Mojave 10.14.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 
1.8.4.186 & Affinity Designer 1.8.4.4 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iPadOS 13.3.1

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Ha! Not sure how #5 became the acid test  :D .

 

..... but okay, here's a side by side. 

 

post-12544-0-99083200-1487046427.png

 

Certainly, no one is suggesting that an outline of Texas can be done with just six nodes. But the shape in this particular limbo dance challenge seems doable. Barely  ;) .

post-12544-0-99083200-1487046427_thumb.png

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