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Hello, 

I want to find the PANTONE color of my current color selection , but i don't know how , Can anyone tells me how please ?

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10 minutes ago, os design said:

i already have the color , but i want to know it PANTONE 

Try this online tool: https://www.ginifab.com/feeds/pms/cmyk_to_pantone.php


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39 minutes ago, os design said:

Hello, 

I want to find the PANTONE color of my current color selection , but i don't know how , Can anyone tells me how please ?

You may not have a PANTONE colour as your currently chosen colour. Pantone colours are just predefined colours which will be reproduced on different presses or fabrics, I am not up on them but I don't know if there is a Pantone colour every possible colour.


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39 minutes ago, Old Bruce said:

I don't know if there is a Pantone colour [for] every possible colour

I don’t think there could be! Even if working exclusively with whole percentages of CMYK, you’d have a hundred million different colours to reproduce (and that’s without taking account of different types of paper/card stock).


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17 hours ago, Alfred said:

I don’t think there could be! Even if working exclusively with whole percentages of CMYK, you’d have a hundred million different colours to reproduce (and that’s without taking account of different types of paper/card stock).

Got this , i use that tool you gave me but , it is not always working , sometimes it is not showing me the pantone color of what i want and i choosed ,So if the color was not the same , should i type the pantone color ? With the colors i used in design.thanks

 

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10 minutes ago, Omran design said:

So if the color was not the same , should i type the pantone color ? With the colors i used in design.thanks

The two reasons to use any Pantone colour are because the client requested it or you are dealing with a budget which can only afford one ink. If you have a colour you and the client like then use the CMYK or RGB values. Make a Document Palette and make a named global colour so you have it in that document.

Aside: Pantone and the various other inking/dye systems are both a blessing and a curse, and I like / hate them all.


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1 hour ago, Old Bruce said:

The two reasons to use any Pantone colour are because the client requested it or you are dealing with a budget which can only afford one ink. If you have a colour you and the client like then use the CMYK or RGB values. Make a Document Palette and make a named global colour so you have it in that document.

Aside: Pantone and the various other inking/dye systems are both a blessing and a curse, and I like / hate them all.

Yes exactely , i did that i gave him RGB,CMYX,HEX,and I converted the rgb-cmyk colors to pantone using your tool , it is not the litteral same but i told him that ,Thanks very much

 

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There will not always be a perfect conversion from CMYK to Pantone. Even less of a chance from RGB as the colour range is much larger and not intended to be used in print, at least traditional print. I like RGB for my wide format as it can handle RGB. 

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On 5/21/2020 at 12:26 AM, Old Bruce said:

The two reasons to use any Pantone colour are because the client requested it or you are dealing with a budget which can only afford one ink. If you have a colour you and the client like then use the CMYK or RGB values. Make a Document Palette and make a named global colour so you have it in that document.

Aside: Pantone and the various other inking/dye systems are both a blessing and a curse, and I like / hate them all.

The main reason to use Pantone colours is because fabric printers use Pantone palettes. I create embroidery designs and all fabric printers require pantone colours so that there is a standard selection across the fabric manufacturing industry.

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Not just fabric printers.  The printers for cardboard box packaging (cereal boxes, tissue boxes, etc) use CMYK plus Pantone spot colors whenever 1) a shade outside the CMYK gamut is required, or 2) a shade inside the gamut needs accurate, full density reproduction.

And duotone and tritone prints are most often set up in Pantone spot colors only, not CMYK or RGB.

[Should add that Pantone has strong competition, especially in various European and Asian markets.  So for "Pantone" in this posting, read "Pantone or competitor".]

And, falling under the "client requested it" category Old Bruce mentioned, corporate imaging frequently requires specific Pantone spot colors for logos and even things like horizontal rules in printed documents.  I used to work for a company whose keynote color was Pantone 206.  Company letterhead, signage, advertising, tradeshow posters, and badges on the hardware we sold had to include Pantone 206.  In print work, the closest CMYK shade to Pantone 206 was absolutely not acceptable.  It had to be a solid spot color.  Vendors that could not handle spot color (either design firms or printers) did not get that company's business.

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And another use of Pantone or other specific colours: in illustrations for books like children books, where you want to be sure that the same colours are used in issue #1 from years ago and in today issue #250… where the characters and their clothes, etc. should always be the same. And should be able to use an older illustration or part of it without worrying.

There's also Pantone/similar colours  collections for paint, so when you choose a colour on the colour swatches, and when you open the resulting paint bucket produce by the vendor's machine, you'll have exactly the same. And if you need another bucket, it should be the same.

Another reason to use Pantones or predefine swatches: usually the resulting printed colour is know, so you won't have surprises receving the printed version with muddy red or green yellow.

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Please do take into consideration this whole topic is only valid when working with filetypes that can preserve named colours. If you would work with conversions, look my answers here :

 

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On 5/30/2020 at 9:36 AM, Wosven said:

And another use of Pantone or other specific colours: in illustrations for books like children books, where you want to be sure that the same colours are used in issue #1 from years ago and in today issue #250… where the characters and their clothes, etc. should always be the same. And should be able to use an older illustration or part of it without worrying.

There's also Pantone/similar colours  collections for paint, so when you choose a colour on the colour swatches, and when you open the resulting paint bucket produce by the vendor's machine, you'll have exactly the same. And if you need another bucket, it should be the same.

Another reason to use Pantones or predefine swatches: usually the resulting printed colour is know, so you won't have surprises receving the printed version with muddy red or green yellow.

 

On 5/31/2020 at 4:48 AM, mrqasq said:

Please do take into consideration this whole topic is only valid when working with filetypes that can preserve named colours. If you would work with conversions, look my answers here :

 

 

On 5/30/2020 at 5:04 AM, sfriedberg said:

Not just fabric printers.  The printers for cardboard box packaging (cereal boxes, tissue boxes, etc) use CMYK plus Pantone spot colors whenever 1) a shade outside the CMYK gamut is required, or 2) a shade inside the gamut needs accurate, full density reproduction.

And duotone and tritone prints are most often set up in Pantone spot colors only, not CMYK or RGB.

[Should add that Pantone has strong competition, especially in various European and Asian markets.  So for "Pantone" in this posting, read "Pantone or competitor".]

And, falling under the "client requested it" category Old Bruce mentioned, corporate imaging frequently requires specific Pantone spot colors for logos and even things like horizontal rules in printed documents.  I used to work for a company whose keynote color was Pantone 206.  Company letterhead, signage, advertising, tradeshow posters, and badges on the hardware we sold had to include Pantone 206.  In print work, the closest CMYK shade to Pantone 206 was absolutely not acceptable.  It had to be a solid spot color.  Vendors that could not handle spot color (either design firms or printers) did not get that company's business.

thanks for all replies , i really appreciate that , but i did not realize to be honest , i am new at coloring and color philosophy, so i want this

1-i have a logo and after designing the logo i am doing the visual identity guideline 

2-this guideline should include a cmyk , rgb ,hex , and i want to put PANTONE too

3-in illustrator i can do this as i saw , But no one demonstrate how to do it in affinity tuts

4-what should i do ? a man gave me the link to convert to pantone 

5-i do not know from which color format and profile should i convert to PANTONE ? 

6-I tried to do it with rgb and it is not the same color so it is wrong or that is normal ?

please some one explain this to me , i am very confused

 

thanks in advanced 

 

Omran

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If your starting point is an sRGB document, where you have defined the logo color as an RGB color value, then you would work from there, assign objects with fills using RGB based color definitions, and save this document. You would then get CMYK values by switching the document color mode to CMYK/8 (File > Document Setup > Color), and choosing the desired CMYK profile. After this, select the objcet with your sRGB color definition and from the Color Panel, switch to CMYK sliders and read the values (or alternatively, double click the color well in the Color Panel).

If you want CMYK value for another profile, you need to open your original sRGB document and switch the color mode to CMYK/8 and choose another profile. Do not convert from one CMYK profile to another (you can do that, too, but color conversions will be different than when you just switch from sRGB to CMYK and pick a profile). Remember too that Affinity apps remember the last used CMYK profile so if you simpy just switch the slider mode in Color Panel from RGB to CMYK that values are based on last used CMYK color profile (and if there is none, the default CMYK color profile defined in the Preferences > Color).

To get PANTONE colors that are close to your sRGB color, go to https://www.pantone.com/color-finder and enter the sRGB value and pick one of the suggested PANTONE matches from the desired PANTONE color library.

colordefinitions.jpg.a1a5aadae6bfbb00c56f9e564b26b04e.jpg

 

Note that depending on the RGB color you initially picked (in RGB color mode using the sRGB color profile), the CMYK conversion of the color may look more or less different when you change the document to CMYK color mode. When having the document in RGB color mode, you can use Soft proof Adjustment layerwise to have visual simulation of the colors in different target color spaces. (When the document is in CMYK color mode, all colors will be shown as if printed using the currently selected CMYK color profile, which means that your RGB color definitions would not use the full color gamut of sRGB, which would be a problem if your start color would be one that has brightness or vividness that cannot be reproduced in CMYK color space).

An alternative starting point could be working with PANTONE Bridge Libraries, as their color definitions are LAB based and designed to produce matching results when used in different color modes, inks and media (RGB, CMYK coated/uncoated, spot coated/uncoated). In logo design there is point in considering color conversions right from the start to see how a specific color translates in different circumstances so that if a close match is wished, the color is picked accordingly. 

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Depending of the main use of the logo and the graphical chart, I'd rather begin working in CMYK to ensure everything will be printed using the choosen Pantone colours, and only convert to RGB for web.

You can easily accept colours diplayed slighty differently dues to different devices and display properties, but less when printing a logo

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      One should always ask the client having Pantone choosen, if it satisfies the client. He's the only one who can be sure. There are some Pantones who are "richer" in color than their CMYK values. In general when I work with Pantone they are my guide, but I always inform the client that in my specific workflow I use CMYK and I can than use my eyes to check in the Pantone CMYK Bridge if I'm close with my estimation. But this comes at my 10y experience. If I would to create logo for a client I would first show him the Pantone chips and let him choose the colors himself. When he would make his mind, than I would use deck for conversion, keeping in mind that in CMYK there aren't as many colors achieveable. It looks like this : CMYK -> Pantone -> RGB. So starting with RGB is tricky, as in the begining you can get in trouble picking the colors that is not printable at all. Designers make that misteake a lot, and even quite large brands have their Pantone mismatched everyday. In the end it always comes to the client and what color he thinks is the right one, even if it's slightly or more off.

      Think of the Logo as a home decor problem. When you go to the decor agency, they will always start with real color chips, so you can see with your own eyes the real color of the items you will be than buying. This will be wood, concrete, wall paint, floor, carpet or anything else. It won't be RGB or CMYK it will be real "chips" that you can take in hand and examine in different light conditions, some of it will have different type of finishing which will affect color aswell.

     This is a very muddy topic working with color. There are a lot of places you can make a mistake. I would only advise you NOT to use any online converters, because they use their calculating technics, and you never now if it's proper or not. I would invest in Pantone guide, preferably with chips, or order chips that might be right for your client, and go from there. It will be far better to have a chip send to the printing company, it will make their life much easier than just giving them Pantone code or worse - RGB value.

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Sending a chip (that isn't too old, and thus faded) to a printing company is good insurance, but it should not be necessary with a reputable printer.  They will order (and possibly mix) the actual Pantone ink based on the Pantone code.  They should not be doing a colorimetric match using a different (non-Pantone) pigment set.

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9 hours ago, sfriedberg said:

Sending a chip (that isn't too old, and thus faded) to a printing company is good insurance, but it should not be necessary with a reputable printer.  They will order (and possibly mix) the actual Pantone ink based on the Pantone code.  They should not be doing a colorimetric match using a different (non-Pantone) pigment set.

this is true only for those as you said "reputable" printing companies. Keep in mind these are 2%. I know many reputable printer operators from my country and I rest ashured all of them want to be percived as they know what color matching is, but truth be told they don't. :) And yes, there are specialty printers that take pantone inks but these aren't in digital I think. And to be honest I don't think the OP is someone who works with clients who can afford ordering quantities that will be printed from Pantone inks like CocaCola does etc.

While it is a possibility to order ink and use it as spot colors - you would have to dedicate one acctuall machine for that client. This would require him to constantly order new prints for all that hassle to be worth invested money.
Pantone states some ****it that let me quote : "
No effect on print head durability " well, it depends on thousends factors so short answer is yes it will.

If I would start a partnership with CocaCola or some other big brand who will keep my machine fed with new orders of prints, hell yeah, I will fill it with 8 spot Pantone Colors, and print 500sqm/h on fabric :)

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