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narrationsd

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  1. Juat downloading the release candidate for today, but I tried out the 603 Beta a few days ago on a reasonably complex InDesign idml file which I had done before, and this time it imported rather perfectly. This is a great improvement from early versions, as appreciated as they were. The document has framed local layouts, images with captions, Asian language segments, multiple sections, and lots of details like hyphenations which had thrown text layout significantly off originally. The text layout decisioning now, while perhaps not quite up to Adobe's long-in-experience parapgraph engine a few places possibly, was just fine. Any remaining desires can be easily adjusted. I'm no professional printing expert, but I think you have been doing a marvelous job, there in Nottingham and from whomever may also be contributing.
  2. Bringing this back into view, updated for latest as commented here:
  3. If you try this out, as in https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OKWEjZMGM1o or other YouTubes which show similarly, it works very well - a feature such as a geometric transform is replicated in Affinity Photo -- great. And thus you can replace the original content with another, retaining the transform, which is very useful where perspective has been created, for example, as your replacement will get the same perspective fit into the overall composition.  However, I ran into problems trying to do more, which seem to center on Smart Objects being implemented, but not Smart Filters. These are simply eliminated, so if you've done anything to the original using them, it's just ignored. A particular problem is that if you did Filter operations on a Smart Object in Photoshop, it automatically turns those into Smart Filters...so you are guaranteed to lose them. There are probably a lot of ins and outs about how Smart Filters could be usefully handled, which will be up to your team to delve into and come up with the best that's practical. Not having more time to play, at the moment it occurs to me that an answer on the PS side would be to create the embedded object separately, pasting it into the composition flattened. I think this is necessary, as I can find no way to successfully flatten a smart filter, Adobe having been so impressed with themselves. Confusing to this, you will find Flatten Image on the PS Layer menu, not the Image menu, and yet it will flatten your entire composition. As well, if you try extracting (via double-clicking) the layer, Flatten on this will end you up with a white background, so that save and close nets you the rest of your composition below the layer covered up. Back to Affinity, I think it's probably apparent that not all Smart Filter operations could be replicated, but perhaps a useful subset that would be worth it? Or in any case, a (cntl-C copiable) warning alert that you've just lost Smart Filters, listing them per Layer of PSD import, would seem a very usefui and easy addition to present 1.8, if you also think so?
  4. @Sean P hoping the update for 1.8.0.555 is getting noted -- couldn't change the title to show it's current.

    There are improvements I think, but the basis problem/s remain...thanks

  5. Something changed in the last updater so that the desktop beta icons shifted unpleasantly around. Although I had the icons positioned to taste, they ended up being put first in icon ordering after the trash bin, thus altering the order in which I'd had everything for familiarity. One would guess that the change is that the old desktop icons were deleted, instead of being over-written. I'd agree having them produced should be optional in the install sequence, but please revert to where you simply over-write instead of first destroying. Thanks.
  6. Jyscal, quite glad you got something that works for you. Why it's better...well, software on Windows, as mentioned. And/or maybe Affinity had improved their fonts-with-issues handling. Points, and reward, for keeping trying Take care, Clive
  7. Just spotted your reply, Jyscal... Well, 'KNOW'ing things are ok on any Windows machine isn't all that easily reckoned, so patience is probably in order. I was looking above to see who else might have offered tips, and wonder if you've tried as @Callum from Affinity suggested, _removing_ those extra fonts you recently added, all of them? You might well be surprised at the result...or yes, not. Also, you might look at the size of the user community, and realize your experience isn't what very many are seeing, which is a way of knowing matters can be more positive. Now, these Affinity apps have at times been slow on font loading when in much earlier betas, but I just cold-started the latest released Design, with hundreds of fonts, and it was up in about 20 seconds. This is on a reasonably fast laptop, probably most importantly to say having an SSD. InDesign, a comparable program to Publish and this set in general, took a little over half that. But also...here's a substantiation for the way I'm telling you this story... Actually, both these times, especially InDesign's which was much slower, are definitely faster than I have been experiencing, for some interval. And what is different is that I had a big upset on the machine last week, due to a bogus Microsoft update of Windows, and in concert with some very sharp depth-level support people you can actually reach there (in India...!) , with enough persistence in such cases, in essence the entire Windows 10 operating system got cleared and reinstalled, along with a number of necessary adjustments. Yes, this can be done, and it's better than what they used to tell you, which was just to start from scratch and rebuild the machine in toto. The new way, your apps and files stay undisturbed...and actually did, including some with dire copy protection. I am not suggesting you do such a thing, please be confident. I am just noting that on my own would have to admit somewhat expertly maintained machine, which I had felt was as clean as experience could say, it obviously wasn't, just in the ways we are aware Windows always has been able to fall apart, invisibly, crumbling from within. What I would do, is try the step of taking out all those new fonts. If that doesn't clear the problem adequately, the font manager solution I proposed will allow you to slim down to just what you need, which should get you through, and may even help see where there may be a corrupt font install. Those are very, very well known to be able to clobber any particular software -- and yes, not necessarily _every_ software. If you find the bad one, you could even send it to Affinity, so they could add some additional bullet-proofing for its problems. Hoping this with above will help you, and anyone else who hits such a frustration... Clive
  8. Hmm, sounds something is really wrong here. You mean you see the problems without opening some gargantuan document, will suppose -- and second open should be if anything faster than the first, as Windows caches at least portions of apps. I have a lot of fonts, probably, and Designer takes just over 400_M_B, Publisher 800 on the fat magazine demo which also has a lot of large images. It wouldn't hurt matters if you afforded 16MB as more reasonable memory these days, especially if you want to run several programs like Affinity's efficiently, and there's always a lot of responsiveness to be gained by going to an SSD from the usual hard disk, but you shouldn't be seeing what you are without these. I'm not going to be able to contribute more this time, but here's Microsoft's instruction page for ways to start your laptop in what they call Safe Mode. MS Safe Mode Safe Mode will let you see what happens without all the add-on invisible programs we end up with, running in the background and sometimes interfering in significant ways with programs that are well designed on their own. If Affinity runs nicely in Safe Mode, then you can look into taking out extra background apps -- there are lots of instructions for going about this on the web, perhaps easy to find if you also mention Safe Boot. The efficient way is often referred to as bisecting, or binary search, meaning you take out a noted half of those apps, then see; if no change, take half of the remaining half; or if change, put back in half of what you took out, etc.. Many of the background apps can be disabled from your Task Manager's Startup tab -- easiest to start with these. Others are Services, which you can look up how to disable also, for a rapid test before deciding to de-install anything. I guess it should be said that another way you could be having problems is if you've caught a virus or trojan; I tend to think of having excellent protection and habits always, but these can slip through and use your machine for all sorts of things. Norton Security is for many years very efficient and very good, and they also have a power cleaner if you find yourself deep in problems. Depending on skills etc., that's the sort of thing where a trusted local service could turn out to be useful. Hadn't intended on covering a gamut, but there we are...
  9. @Jyscal, answer is possibly get and use a font manager. - this way you don't have to hve all fonts loaded all the time - you can arrange them in (overlapping if you like) groups, according to task - you can list favorites - more complete ones have analyzers for duplicates and font problems, which will help aoid slowness and possible app crashes Which are good? Well, I haven't really favored most; they tend to stall in contemporary development, or be awkward. The one I liked best, NexusFont , was nicely presented, but the developer moved on. There are the expensive ones...most of the rest have free not-very-limited tryouts so you can see. The one with an endless-draining subscription has, of course, a gaming-you very limited tryout. - MainType may have some balance of awkwardness and features; it will ding you for paying every time; the trick to shortcut its button-hopper is to say you'll pay, then cancel, until you do choose to - Typograf might be worth a look, if it's quite opinionated - if an office pays, one of the higher priced might be worth their hundred Euros - the best I expect is to ask your better printer or layout/design pals, see what they prefer... good fortune - be the foxy hunter (since this forum knew there was an emoji -- and curtly refused it)
  10. Well, just to say, I did install Inkscape on Win10, and try it...on a photo, was just trouble. I am sure those who put the effort in long ago to figure how to treat it for getting traces still can, but... An opportunity we'll hope Affinity finds their moment to pick up on, here, and I guess they know that.
  11. Translation (rough, but you get the idea...) Axel Foley, una sugerencia. Puede usar el Traductor de Google (translate.google.com) para sus publicaciones y para recibir respuestas. Está lejos de ser perfecto, pero utilizable, y creo que el idioma español no es una habilidad amplia en Nottingham, Inglaterra, donde se hace el software.
  12. Yes, and as Potrace is not available in any of its Gui forms _except_ on Mac... However, I had a quick look this morning, and: - DrawPlus, you'd need to buy, to try - Microsoft's ancient Expression is listed and downloadable, but the tracing is dire - So I fired up my CS6 end-of-life Illustrator, and contrary to memory, its trace seemed quite good. It's maybe the presets, kind of hidden on the invisi-bar just above the drawing, which is making this so. - Thus, as long as tracing images which are your own or from sources you know you can trust, Illustrator if you have it seems to enjoy a long coming life. - And Affinity deals nicely with Illustrator files, so there's no loss of effort there. - You'd still think the bright in Nottingham would do a nice job of tracing without too much taxing of themselves, but just possibly there are more pressing matters...we should understand
  13. Have to say, watching that tutorial shows DrawPlus's tool to be very nice in operation. For $25/UKP20, it seems a no-brainer if you have the need, since Affinity / Amazon still allow purchasing the no-longer-supported final version. I'm not expert on these matters, but as far as trace quality/ies, there are a lot of comments in this thread saying (artistically) pen-tracing often beats auto-trace. This would fit my experience with Illustrator -- by the time you play with settings enough to get near what you want, the drawing board grows in atraction to tastebuds. Maybe that's a point of view that could draw Affinity designers into a different corner...they do such good work in producing tools superior, not just replacement, for Adobe's, and here there's the opportunity to make 'appropriate technology' out of the DrawPlus bones. By which means, easy appiication, of course in new Affinity apps style, abilities attuned to producing the level of result really useful autotrace can, while leaving the unattainable 'touch' to manual tracing. The software could even say so...
  14. That was a stunning set of demonstrations in your release Event. And it's a great accomplishment, how far you've brought Affinity/Serif, not to say a bright future. It pleases me greatly to see this come out of the Northern England where I once had considerable experience consulting to then-software companies. Studio Link is marvelous - because of your architecture. It really is instant, with no need to have the subsidiary applications open. This is truly well done. Of course, I couldn't run it. Not until an hour of troubleshooting, as there was no link up yet with suggestions. I will make another. First, i have to say that I contacted you on the Beta forum, to 'suggest' with greybeard experience that you just possibly might want to actually Beta this, before today's big bang. This was summarily dismissed: 'we've done a lot of testing you haven't seen, and you'll be surprised.' Just like the Lancashire Girl, who famously 'can't be told.' Of course, this is Marketing driving the ship, and it really shows. And could be a learning moment? Ok, here's what this cost me, perhaps with too much knowledge aforehand, and of course not the detail you could never know. have latest betas of all three installed, long Beta participant upgraded to latest non-Beta Designer and Photo, last night download and installed the Publisher release. Strangely, I don't believe it asked me for a key, but maybe. looks to work, as expected, so let's use the Design personality. Fail. Get alert below, which one would get very tired of, saying I hadn't installed. de-install Design and Photo. Reinstall. Validate keys. 'Open' as required. Fail Studio Link, 'not installed' again. de-install all three. Reinstall. Keys asked for Design and Photo only. Runs. Fails Studio Link again. try to get smart. Believe it might be because I run Win10 (very latest 1903) always not-admin for security, as sense must. So I change login to an admin one, re-login, delete and install all three. Fail. ok, getting serious, and a serious waste of time. I continue as admin, deinstall all three, hunt down and find the Program Data Affinity folder. Delete that, and this time didn't have to delete a Program Files/Affinity folder, as somehow this deinstall properly zapped it, which others before did not. Probably to do with that non-admin running installer and permitting by another admin login's password., no? install all three, try them individually. All three now do require a key. Shut them down, all. run Publisher. Try Studio Link. It works. Fantastic. An hour gone. But it is extraordinary, one more great tool from you guys. _then_ I look again, and there is finally a post. About ten down in it, someone from Affinity finally stops asking 'if you installed', and comes up with a very targeted removal which I presume does answer the issue. -probably this file-to-be-deleted (again requiring admin permission, and lack of fearfulness in monkeying with Windows' innards, a fear that would be fully justiied) is surgically targeted this way to avoid taking out recording of license keys, etc.. But. Now, you have to ask: a. why on earth not have the Publisher installer take out this marvelous blocking file with the long path?? b. we can answer, probably: you didn't know. c. now we are back to Marketing-directed refusal to Beta, so as to believe they will generate the Big Bang d. and/or, the person who answered me with such cussedness is like a fellow who really was the guru in one of those Northern concerns twenty years ago, who I liked, but would respond straight to customers with his famous intonement, 'Works as Designed', if any treaded on weird and wonderful 'features' that had done them in -- if he felt that was right and had a reason, yes. But a little open hearing would have told him more. You guys are doing wonderful things, and I have told many of those I've found, the ways your tools are very much cleverer in thinking that makes tough image needs easy to solve. I hope you will take some lessons, and not spoil it again by some move that flies in the face of sense any actual maker knows, and for some reason all tied up in wanting to puff up. You don't need gimmicks to have the right to feel puffed up. That's what I'd say... Regards truly, Clive not a Brit, but I lived a long time there once, and I quite remember a fine-ness in my time...
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