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That Blender fund is tiny and probably wouldn't cover the c osts of development if they'd need to make a leaving from that.

Synfig is not an example. Can't expect income from a freely offered software, that is, BTW, built for Windows and Mac too. So, if it does have no success, is related to other issues than being present on a such limited platform - some say .

Gimp is not an alternative, sorry, along with other RAW and panorama and whatever tools. Why? It's not what it can or can't do, but the methodology. Inkscape, Gimp, Scribus, seem to be made by programmers for programmers (I know, I am one), but not for designers and photography professionals. As long as pros don't use them, they won't have a true feedback of what those should be. I've tried them, as programmer, and I must say they go far away from what a designer or photographer need. And keep going away... more and more.... Those apps have basic features broken and nobody bothers to fix them in years... So, let's stop discussing them.

I am a programmer and I make a living based on Windows. Because this is what is required as OS. I don't hate it. But for me became a matter of trust. On one hand, I see it still a mix of old and new stuff, technically speaking, like the old control panel versus the new settings. They still don't update that, so it looks dual. Then what are they doing with every massive update? Besides security. I don't see new features... Even the tabbed explorer was postponed twice, AFAIK. How hard it would be, considering the huge incomes? There are niche companies that managed to do it. And there is more stuff to do that would help the users every day.... Then, I have installed a firewall... To find that when I open an image with the default provided image viewer, their app goes to some Microsoft of affiliate URL to do something. I, as user, must agree with this. What does it send to them? It's my private photo or professional work that should not go out. I guess there is more, far from simple feature metering. This is unacceptable and is a security breach for businesses, IMHO. So I chose some open OS, that is, at least, accessible for audit in this matter.

Now, usage. My wife is going to master in her field of activity. It's a total unrelated to IT, and my 7 years son knows handling the phone ot computer better. She could happily work, without asking much questions, with KDE and LibreOffice. So, stop blaming Linux for not being usable. Gnome or KDE are more than fine. They are more flexible than other OSes UIs and DEs.

So, professional designer and photography, at least , are missing on Linux and can't say how successful new professional software would be, based on what is there, because is not. I can give you simple usage scenarios, like taking a bunch of RAW photo files, aligning them properly and tuning their together, at once, to meet the same aspect, merge them and send them as RAW or digital negative to the next application to further tune the result. PS does this in minutes. What else does? And I'm talking at hobbyist level, for pros is so clear where the right apps lay.

And, yes, there is no place for romanticism in business. But there's a niche...

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20 minutes ago, msdobrescu said:

That Blender fund is tiny and probably wouldn't cover the c osts of development if they'd need to make a leaving from that.

It's not what you'd expect from a massive company, but the Blender Foundation is a non-profit, managed by one of the employed developers, and they currently only have 5 team members.

You wouldn't expect them to do all that much, given how bare bones it is, but over the last year, they've made massive, MASSIVE gains, enough to garner fairly widespread attention to the program. Those 5 guys are apparently really good at what they do.

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12 minutes ago, Renzatic said:

It's not what you'd expect from a massive company, but the Blender Foundation is a non-profit, managed by one of the employed developers, and they currently only have 5 team members.

You wouldn't expect them to do all that much, given how bare bones it is, but over the last year, they've made massive, MASSIVE gains, enough to garner fairly widespread attention to the program. Those 5 guys are apparently really good at what they do.

Don't get me wrong, Blender is fantastic! And deserves more! But the funds are subject to taxes, even though non-profit or donated. Development costs too, to name just the power and the computers. 5 guys, but not much money for the value they provide. And they feed a lot of good add-on providers too.

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5 minutes ago, msdobrescu said:

Don't get me wrong, Blender is fantastic! And deserves more! But the funds are subject to taxes, even though non-profit or donated. Development costs too, to name just the power and the computers. 5 guys, but not much money for the value they provide. And they feed a lot of good add-on provides too.

I vaguely recall one of the developers stating that he doesn't make as much working for Blender as he would elsewhere in the industry. It's primarily a passion project for everyone there. They're all there because they love the job, and it makes for great resume padding.

With that said, I don't think any of them are suffering too much. At the very least, I expect they get fed 3 meals a day plus snacks.

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5 hours ago, msdobrescu said:

So, stop blaming Linux for not being usable. Gnome or KDE are more than fine. They are more flexible than other OSes UIs and DEs.

Is not difficult for me, I started in the early years of console-only. It is for both professionals and average users I know. Almost a 90% of those that I find.  I've only managed that my father kind of tolerates Libre Office, but only over Windows, and 'cause I'm constantly at his place teaching him to use it. When I say I have tried a lot of people to use Linux, I really mean it. installed a bunch of distros for people through the years.

For a pro... Well, a lot pro graphic devices have no Linux drivers ( I have a bunch here that don't. Lucky me , I use Windows). Yep, not Linux's fault, but in the end the pro needs to be pragmatic. Color management is possible but quite more cumbersome and less flexible than in both Mac and Windows.  then there's the lack of  graphic software for many matters (not just the issue of a PS, AI and ID replacement. If that'd be all, lol... )

5 hours ago, msdobrescu said:

Inkscape, Gimp, Scribus, seem to be made by programmers for programmers (I know, I am one), 

Well, I am not a programmer, while I am indeed pro in several graphic fields. And while I agree that the UIs are quite non intuitive, and what is way, way worse for a pro, they are slower than the pro options in Mac and Windows : More clicks, more steps, less fluidity (also less options and key features for pro market, not available). And that's indeed more critical . You can learn a hard UI. I learnt XSI and Blender, and neither was easy to learn (neither was VIM, for a graphic, visual worker...). But you need them to be fast. That said : I made pro work with the 3, at a pair of companies, not as a hobby (so, I know quite what I'm talking about)  , for print even. And... fun facts : Try to make a perfect espiral that distributes elements along it (or just an espiral) with *cough* other nice pro apps. Well, you can in Inkscape. Also, it has a trace solution embedded (is potrace, but well embedded)  . Not that I need it very much, but is sth present in AI and not in Designer. Is just one bad example (tho a lot of ppl cry for the feature) , but there are many things that Inskcape, gimp, and Scribus DO particularly well in some things, in a small few, better than in the CC. Have you noticed that several POD companies have even specs to deliver to them the stuff from Scribus ? Well, I have. And I dislike the tool's UI way, way more than Inkscape's or Gimp's.  If you are a hobbyist in what is graphics, but a professional in programming, you might have not noticed some of those many things. The caligraphy tool, the actual inking tool in Inkscape is superb, very flexible in settings, is great for comic inking, for example, but also for any line-art work.

Indeed, the Linux community has done this of stagnating  and not helping those three, since always : underrating the existing tools, so, they never make a big effort to help them, while the potential in the 3 is immense (GEGL arriving to Gimp is going to be *absolutely* revolutionary)..  But if the consideration about them keeps the same, yeah,  the apps continue the same, and without any help, over the years..

The entire graphics production field (/s) is far from being just handling RAWs...


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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@SrPx, I feel that pain as you do even at hobbyist level, or occasional designer (I need that sometimes, the companies I work with need that expertise sometimes and need integrate things like EPS in their apps). IMHO, a hobbyist has less patience, needs more simple achieving features than pros, they don't have the designers education. so they tend to be more difficult to please. They afford to say "go away" and pick something else that fulfills their needs fast.

Still, there is a niche that somebody must fill sometime.

I have friends that refused helping free software with their advice for not being paid for that, yet complaining for not having those free tools on the right path.

Me, I would buy as hobbyist the designer and the photo gems from Affinity, but on Linux, because, lately, I moved to it.

Since last two biannual big releases of Windows, when they have broke the hardware virtualisation on my board and Windows can't boot anymore until I disable it in BIOS, I think thoroughly if I need a long session under Windows, in order to go through the pain of setting it in BIOS forth and back, just to process my photos in PS. So, my dream is to get rid of Windows. Can't tell you how long it took to figure out the source of the problem... The VM is a must on my PC lately, you know... (for second Linux KDE development, that became amazingly easy lately).

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6 hours ago, msdobrescu said:

Since last two biannual big releases of Windows, when they have broke the hardware virtualisation on my board and Windows can't boot anymore until I disable it in BIOS, I think thoroughly if I need a long session under Windows, in order to go through the pain of setting it in BIOS forth and back, just to process my photos in PS. So, my dream is to get rid of Windows. Can't tell you how long it took to figure out the source of the problem... The VM is a must on my PC lately, you know... (for second Linux KDE development, that became amazingly easy lately).

In theory, you could forego your Windows partition entirely by using a VM in Linux with GPU passthrough enabled.

Given your general knowledge, you've probably already heard of this, and are well aware of the benefits and pitfalls it entails. But if on some small chance you haven't, it's a way to allow a VM to take exclusive access to an GPU, rather than emulating one, providing massive, nearly native gains in performance equivalent to the output you'd see in Windows proper. The downsides are that you need a machine with 2 GPUs, one to dedicate to the native OS, and one to the VM, and that it can be a pain in the butt to set up properly.

If you're that set on wanting to leave Windows, it is a viable option. A rather complicated, somewhat extreme one, but an option nonetheless.

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Regarding the discussion on Gimp, Inkscape, and Krita. The way I see it, the Linux community as a whole could make the platform more attractive to creatives if a version of Linux got pre-packaged with those open source programs, and a significant effort was made to support and maintain them. As much praise as these open source alternatives have got over the years, the fact that programs like Gimp to this day lack features like non-destructive Adjustment layers among other things will ensure that they will rarely if ever be used in a professional setting. If a more unified effort was done across the open source communities, Linux could provide a decent base package for creatives to work on, which could in turn make it more attractive in the long run for other companies to consider porting to Linux.

Blender is so far the only open source creative program I know that has successfully broken into the professional scene in any significant capacity, yet even Blender hasn't been able to get its foot through the door to the biggest studios for special effects. Based on my own observations, Blender is the most competently done open source project because of how it is organized as well as the easy access to open channels to communicate with the Foundation and community members. Gimp, Inkscape, and Krita on the other hand I have got the impression that they are not nearly as open and organized, and after briefly trying each a few years ago, it kind of shows.

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1 hour ago, Frozen Death Knight said:

Regarding the discussion of Gimp, Inkscape, and Krita. The way I see it, the Linux community as a whole could make the platform more attractive to creatives if a version of Linux got pre-packaged with those open source programs, and a significant effort was made to support and maintain them. As much praise as these open source alternatives have got over the years, the fact that programs like Gimp to this day lack features like non-destructive Adjustment layers among other things will ensure that they will rarely if ever be used in a professional setting. If a more unified effort was done across the open source communities, Linux could provide a decent base package for creatives to work on, which could in turn make it more attractive in the long run for other companies to consider porting to Linux.

Blender is so far the only open source creative program I know that has successfully broken into the professional scene in any significant capacity, yet even Blender hasn't been able to get its foot through the door to the biggest studios for special effects. Based on my own observations, Blender is the most competently done open source project because of how it is organized as well as the easy access to open channels to communicate with the Foundation and community members. Gimp, Inkscape, and Krita on the other hand I have got the impression that they are nearly as open and organized, and after briefly trying each a few years ago, it kind of shows.

I think you meant Gimp, Inskcape and Scribus. Besides Krita  is more of a heavily specialized digital painting-only tool,  and so not comparable to any of the tools in Affinitty, there are other huge factors that set it apart:  1) It's relatively young, compared to the other three.  2) Despite its youth, it has, IMHO! evolved much faster than the other three 3) Might be fair to the others to mention that it does not have to drag with it a very old legacy code (like the case of Gimp) 4) It DOES have a solid organization inside in what is funding : while they're always over a thin wire, more or less they are sustainability minded persons, an dthey have been able to fund till now all of the development. With not much help from Linux companies, BTW. 5) It's innovative as heck. 6) Has a brilliant present and future (I'm of the kind that thinks that the other 3 have it, too) 7) While Gimp is particularly changing in its speed (it evolves faster and better now, and has a way out of its problems, with GEGL and other matters) , Krita has an advantage over at least (I don't follow really Scribus project) Gimp and Inkscape : Much faster development. But let's be fair... is notlike with 3 to 5 developers you can go any faster. These people are often getting close to nothing for their work, indeed.

Now, Gimp has the issue of having super old internal legacy probs in its code. It was very hard to change certain things. If I understood it well from people that are quite related to it, GEGL is going to save the day in that regard (too).

For me, there are way more worrying lacks and issues in Gimp than the lack of adjustment layers (I worked without that for so many years). Like the absence of an actual CMYK mode (again, it seems it's coming finally, after many years, thanks to a Google Summer of Code project (and obviously the person making it) and GEGL) , and more options for color management, and export for print. Faster and more sensible workflows in many things are badly needed, but these are IMO less likely to change..... But it also counts on very advanced editing that most of the critics don't really know. Inkscape... Has several functions non present in Designer (I use it yet for that) , even some that Illustrator does not have. Scribus allows working with CMYK mode since a very long time, and IMO, is one of the more complete of the 3, but its problem is a bit of a non standard, painful UI (a bit like happens with the others). It indeed is used for some people for publishing. 

I believe there are way more open source apps that have a pro finishing and cover enough of its commercial competitors in other platforms.  I regularly use in my work (and so I did while I still worked at companies, all of these apps) Thunderbird where I have configured to collect all my IMAP accounts (I have all so). Wings 3D is not a full 3D package like Blender, it is specialized only in modeling low and mid cage (for detail modeling you can go with the freeware Sculptris, Blender Sculpt, or a bunch of others) Firefox, Libre Office... There's quite some software that is in pro level or close to it. It is just that it typically can't do some things and you learn to  compensate that with other tools (open source, freeware, or low/mid cost commercial).

There have indeed been many occasions where Gimp (at least this one) has been included in Linux distros.  And not just those "artists focused" distros that very long time ago (I'm sure many of the users here weren't using Linux at the time that started as a thing)  came with Gimp installed by default. But I do agree in one thing : The ENTIRE community, and this includes specially the large Linux companies that are since long time working in linux or heavily depending on it, should really, really put a lot more resources, money, (to provide with a way to have more permanent developers in each project of these 4 main ones in graphics) in Gimp, Inkscape, Scribus and Krita. The 4 are very important (is crazy that what some ppl say " krita instead of Gimp". It's orange to apples, and both are very needed.)

But yeah, strongly agree on that point. These FOSS applications are disrespected too often, and not helped with donations, not by linux companies, neither by linux users. And they do have a lot of potential.


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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On 7/5/2019 at 5:18 PM, Renzatic said:

Their use of open source code is something of an aside, considering the product they're really selling isn't their software, they give that away, they're selling their help and reliability.

That's a business model that just wouldn't work for Serif, who offer software that's self contained, and doesn't need to be maintained by highly trained professionals on a daily basis. They couldn't get away with the prices Red Hat charges.

And Blender? Next to the Linux kernel itself, it's probably THE darling of the FOSS scene. It's a powerful piece of software that attracts tons of talent, has a head developer/manager who's practically on a first name basis with his entire following (hell, I think I might even have said something to Ton at one point), and enjoys massive amounts of mindshare. Blender is in a pretty unique position, and is reaping the benefits of being there.

Now Serif is slowly and surely gaining a positive reputation for their work, and they obviously have a number of talented coders in their employ, but using a for-profit, closed sourced model to sell licenses for their software probably means that people won't be quite as generous with their money as they are with the Blender Foundation, and taking donations to support further work outside of their usual revenue stream would probably be filled with tons of legal boondoggles, along with potential hits to their reputation if things don't go 100% according to plan at all times.

Red Hat's use of open source is absolutely not an aside, it's the core of the company (to the point where acquired company code even goes open). You're thinking of Apple and Microsoft who only open source things if it directly benefits them, or to attempt to buy their way in to FOSS goodwill.

I'm not saying that Serif needs to use those business models, nor even go open source. I'm saying the idea there's no money to be made on Linux is straight garbage, when there are even open source companies making money. There's plenty of proprietary software on Linux that I pay for on a regular basis too.

 

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8 hours ago, Frozen Death Knight said:

Regarding the discussion on Gimp, Inkscape, and Krita. The way I see it, the Linux community as a whole could make the platform more attractive to creatives if a version of Linux got pre-packaged with those open source programs, and a significant effort was made to support and maintain them. As much praise as these open source alternatives have got over the years, the fact that programs like Gimp to this day lack features like non-destructive Adjustment layers among other things will ensure that they will rarely if ever be used in a professional setting. If a more unified effort was done across the open source communities, Linux could provide a decent base package for creatives to work on, which could in turn make it more attractive in the long run for other companies to consider porting to Linux.

Blender is so far the only open source creative program I know that has successfully broken into the professional scene in any significant capacity, yet even Blender hasn't been able to get its foot through the door to the biggest studios for special effects. Based on my own observations, Blender is the most competently done open source project because of how it is organized as well as the easy access to open channels to communicate with the Foundation and community members. Gimp, Inkscape, and Krita on the other hand I have got the impression that they are not nearly as open and organized, and after briefly trying each a few years ago, it kind of shows.

Heres a couple after 7 seconds of searching.

https://labs.fedoraproject.org/en/design-suite/

https://ubuntustudio.org/

Which is beyond ridiculous because this isn't a requirement on MacOS or Windows for the OS to be ready out of the box with all software (though the Mac does a pretty good job of that for Audio/Video).

 

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On 7/7/2019 at 9:12 PM, LucasKA said:

 

Heres a couple after 7 seconds of searching.

https://labs.fedoraproject.org/en/design-suite/

https://ubuntustudio.org/

Which is beyond ridiculous because this isn't a requirement on MacOS or Windows for the OS to be ready out of the box with all software (though the Mac does a pretty good job of that for Audio/Video).

 

That's all well and good, but that is only one half of the equation. Does the Linux community as a whole actually financially support these programs or provide big enough support such as human resources, i.e. programers? A follow up question, do you support any of these programs financially or code for them? It sure would help convincing other companies to start porting over their own software if they saw a huge amount of support from the Linux community already existing on the platform for their open source software like Gimp and others.

The way I see it, the Linux community is barking up the wrong tree if they want Linux to have the type of software support Windows and Macs have. Companies go where the money goes, and there has to be Linux driven companies and organisations with deep pockets that could help finance other open source projects already supporting Linux to help drive progress forward for more wide commercial appeal. Heck, said companies/organisations could even reach out to the likes of Adobe or Serif to incentivice them to port over to the platform as well. I think a lot could be done on this front to help make Linux a more popular platform, especially for creatives.

As for my own stance regarding Linux, I like working on Windows, but I wouldn't mind trying out Linux if I was able to do proper creative work with it (I do use Blender, so that at least should transition well) and was able to play all the games I want on my machine. I understand the frustration of not having your preferred platform supported, but I don't think Serif or Adobe will change their minds any time soon unless the Linux community as a whole starts pushing hard on their own home turf that they crave these types of programs, and they clearly show its members are more than willing to support these programs financially. I do not doubt that Linux has the potential to be a good platform for creatives if some effort was put in, but first the general perception of the platform has to change.

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54 minutes ago, LucasKA said:

I'm not saying that Serif needs to use those business models, nor even go open source. I'm saying the idea there's no money to be made on Linux is straight garbage, when there are even open source companies making money. There's plenty of proprietary software on Linux that I pay for on a regular basis too.

 

There's plenty of money to be made in Linux Land, and yes, there are plenty of proprietary programs out there that sell well on the platform.

It just may not be a good fit for Serif, at least not right now. Like I said before, the Linux demographic is a pretty specific one. One that may not necessarily be interested in the products Serif offers. They could go for broke, release the Affinity suite, and see how things go, but Serif is a pretty small outfit, and the cost they'll sink in porting their software might end up putting the health of the company at risk.

Think of their current stance less as "we don't think Linux is worth it", and more "it's currently too much of a gamble for us to take at the moment." If they were stating the former, I'd argue against it. There's ton of potential in Linux. The latter? There's not much I can say to counter that. It's not that they don't want to try, it's that they only have so many resources at their disposal, and they'd rather put them towards what they've already got established, rather than stretching themselves too thin. 

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7 hours ago, Renzatic said:

There's plenty of money to be made in Linux Land, and yes, there are plenty of proprietary programs out there that sell well on the platform.

It just may not be a good fit for Serif, at least not right now. Like I said before, the Linux demographic is a pretty specific one. One that may not necessarily be interested in the products Serif offers. They could go for broke, release the Affinity suite, and see how things go, but Serif is a pretty small outfit, and the cost they'll sink in porting their software might end up putting the health of the company at risk.

Think of their current stance less as "we don't think Linux is worth it", and more "it's currently too much of a gamble for us to take at the moment." If they were stating the former, I'd argue against it. There's ton of potential in Linux. The latter? There's not much I can say to counter that. It's not that they don't want to try, it's that they only have so many resources at their disposal, and they'd rather put them towards what they've already got established, rather than stretching themselves too thin. 

Yes, this makes sense. However, I actually quit making any talking points about Serif specifically a few weeks ago. Begging a company that is clearly uninterested is just pointless, and seeing as how Designer was originally MacOS exclusive "from scratch" and then they rebuilt it for Windows, I can clearly see that porting again would probably be betting the farm since they didn't have that business foresight.

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7 hours ago, Frozen Death Knight said:

That's all well and good, but that is only one half of the equation. Does the Linux community as a whole actually financially support these programs or provide big enough support such as human resources, i.e. programers? A follow up question, do you support any of these programs financially or code for them? It sure would help convince other companies to start porting over their own software if they saw a huge amount of support from the Linux community already existing on the platform for their open source software like Gimp and others.

The way I see it, the Linux community is barking up the wrong tree if they want Linux to have the type of software support Windows and Macs have. Companies go where the money goes, and there has to be Linux driven companies and organisations with deep pockets that could help finance other open source projects already supporting Linux to help drive progress forward for more wide commercial appeal. Heck, said companies/organisations could even reach out to the likes of Adobe or Serif to incentivice them to port over to the platform as well. I think a lot could be done on this front to help make Linux a more popular platform, especially for creatives.

As for my own stance regarding Linux, I like working on Windows, but I wouldn't mind trying out Linux if I was able to do proper creative work with it (I do use Blender, so that at least should transition well) and was able to play all the games I want on my machine. I understand the frustration of not having your preferred platform supported, but I don't think Serif nor Adobe will change their minds any time soon unless the Linux community as a whole starts pushing hard on their own home turf that they crave these types of programs and clearly show that they are more than willing to support them financially. I don't doubt that Linux has the potential to be a good platform for creatives if some effort was put in, but first the general perception of the platform has to change.

I work at Red Hat (I'm a UI Engineer even), so I contribute to Open Source projects (mostly web though since that's my expertise) and I contribute to Red Hat projects as well. I have also directly donated money to Blender, Krita, Audacity, Ardour, Inkscape, ElementaryOS, Solus, and other projects. I have no problem dropping money on useful tools (I don't even use Elementary or Solus and have given them $25)

There's a rock and a hard place that I think some of these FOSS Design tools struggle with, and it's being in the middle of the spectrum. There's the Enterprise (Where Red Hat shines, raking in BILLIONS), and there's the hobbyist/amateur. The latter are notoriously cheap (Like won't even shell out for Affinity cheap), and are most likely pirating the current Adobe suite. The former is a harder to break into and there's real real money. Then there are the people in the middle (Digital Designers such as myself).

There's plenty of people asking for it, even this one thread in one corner of the internet has garnered 37 pages of discussion. There are lots of conversations but not a ton of action, hence the reason I think someone could clean up in that middle Design space, and where a lot attempts are falling short (Gravit).

As for your personal stance, I actually suggest you would be better served just staying with Windows. You definitely aren't going to be able to "play all the games you want". You think creative software is bad? The Windows monopoly on gaming graphics with DirectX is much stronger than even that sweet sweet PSD vendor lock Adobe has you in.

 


 

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While I get that it's a tough call to create the Affinity products for Linux, how about thinging about something in the middle:

I don't know how much Affinity relies on DirectX10, but maybe a version that uses DX11 or even OpenGL/Vulkan would make it possible to run the software on Wine. That could be a real thing ...

So. My two cents on this. :D

 

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Maybe we should just stop hoping and support https://www.photopea.com/ (photopea dot com) instead. He's really active and if he could hire more people could become our solution for linux. Also Affinity could keep their focus on Windows and Mac as there is a good alternative.

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17 hours ago, pekranodon said:

I don't know how much Affinity relies on DirectX10, but maybe a version that uses DX11 or even OpenGL/Vulkan would make it possible to run the software on Wine. That could be a real thing ...

If I had to take an uneducated stab at a guess, I'd say that the Affinity programs lean heavily on the Direct2D API, which, last I heard, has pretty poor support in WINE.

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10 hours ago, Noel Schenk said:

Maybe we should just stop hoping and support https://www.photopea.com/ (photopea dot com) instead. He's really active and if he could hire more people could become our solution for linux. Also Affinity could keep their focus on Windows and Mac as there is a good alternative.

Sorry, I wouldn't use an online solution.

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9 minutes ago, Noel Schenk said:

It's not online. It runs locally in your browser.

I admit it is technically possible, but I don't trust it really happens. And there are also limitations, though.

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Nothing really useful to add to the discussion that hasn't been said before. I just want to let Serif know that yet another person would be willing to pay for a native Linux version of the Affinity range.

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On 7/8/2019 at 6:02 AM, LucasKA said:

I work at Red Hat (I'm a UI Engineer even), so I contribute to Open Source projects (mostly web though since that's my expertise) and I contribute to Red Hat projects as well. I have also directly donated money to Blender, Krita, Audacity, Ardour, Inkscape, ElementaryOS, Solus, and other projects. I have no problem dropping money on useful tools (I don't even use Elementary or Solus and have given them $25)

There's a rock and a hard place that I think some of these FOSS Design tools struggle with, and it's being in the middle of the spectrum. There's the Enterprise (Where Red Hat shines, raking in BILLIONS), and there's the hobbyist/amateur. The latter are notoriously cheap (Like won't even shell out for Affinity cheap), and are most likely pirating the current Adobe suite. The former is a harder to break into and there's real real money. Then there are the people in the middle (Digital Designers such as myself).

There's plenty of people asking for it, even this one thread in one corner of the internet has garnered 37 pages of discussion. There are lots of conversations but not a ton of action, hence the reason I think someone could clean up in that middle Design space, and where a lot attempts are falling short (Gravit).

As for your personal stance, I actually suggest you would be better served just staying with Windows. You definitely aren't going to be able to "play all the games you want". You think creative software is bad? The Windows monopoly on gaming graphics with DirectX is much stronger than even that sweet sweet PSD vendor lock Adobe has you in.

Glad to hear that there are people out there taking the initiative to push development forward. You have my respect. :D

Yeah, I agree with your assessment regarding the communities for these FOSS tools being more on the cheap side. I use Blender and I can't really afford spending money on the Blender Foundation every month, but I've bought a few add-ons that I thought would help my modelling workflow and done what I can reporting bugs during the 2.8 Beta as well as provided as much feedback as possible on how to improve various aspects of the software. If I had a job and a decent income I would donate some to the Foundation since they have done such a good job working on Blender since I started using the software for the first time in December last year. Until then, I will do what little I can to improve the software, since I vastly prefer its UI and workflow over Maya which I actually started off learning (although Maya does have some really great tools).

Photopea actually looks pretty promising for giving Linux some needed love in that department. It's not really good for painting or drawing because of how slow it is on large canvases (tried opening an old artwork file and drawing on it was super slow, not to mention the extremely primitive brush engine), but it has lot of the essentials for photo editing and manipulation (non-destructive adjustment layers ftw!), which would work pretty well with a painting program like Krita. As an old Photoshop user it was pretty much identical to the software and far less cumbersome than Gimp. I just hope the developer gets enough funding to be able to employ more people so he can keep working on the project for a very long time.

Yeah, I kind of figured that would become a problem. The game platforms I am the most concerned with being supported on Linux would be Battle.Net and Steam, since I rarely if ever use any other platform for gaming. As for the PSDs locking me in, I am not so concerned about that anymore since my files can be opened and converted to the Affinity file format. ^_^

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