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kirkt

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  1. Like
    kirkt got a reaction from Alfred in Refining a colour change on a car   
    You might get a better result converting your black and white image to Lab, and then painting the brown body color of the car onto the a and b channels directly (they will be shades of gray in the a and b channels, but will combine to make the brown color in the composite).  You can make a color patch in the document with the correct brown color and then, when you view the a channel for example, sample the patch with the dropper tool to get the correct grayscale tone that is present in the brown color and paint into the body area of the car.  To make the job easier, create a mask on the brown body paint layer that isolates the painting to just the body work, then you do not have to be too careful with your painting.  You can even just fill the a and b channels of the layer with the correct gray tone and then apply the mask.
    The idea is that the detail in the black and white image is pushed into the L channel, and the color is then applied to the a and b channels to get the composite look you want.
    Kirk
  2. Thanks
    kirkt reacted to Alfred in Change default opening application for photos   
    I’m not a Mac user but I’d be surprised if you really have to type a capital i (i.e. Shift+i) for this.
    On Windows you can right-click and choose ‘Open With...’ from the context menu.
  3. Thanks
    kirkt got a reaction from Alfred in Change default opening application for photos   
    You do not need to type a capital I - I just clarified that because the forum uses a sans serif font that could also look like a lower case “L”. 
     
    kirk
  4. Like
    kirkt got a reaction from mrfabzzz in Affinity photo - strange behaviour with affine filter   
    Does your texture image have an area of white border around it, outside of the bounds of the document?  Before you try the affine transform, try right-clicking on the layer with your texture (in the Layers panel) and selecting "Rasterize and trim..." - then perform the affine transform and see if that white gap disappears.
    Kirk
  5. Like
    kirkt reacted to mrfabzzz in Affinity photo - strange behaviour with affine filter   
    Thank you both @kirkt and @James Ritson.
    This solved the issue, indeed I cropped to a square ratio, I don't know that operation keep the information outside the canvas.
     
  6. Like
    kirkt got a reaction from jmwellborn in Bethanie   
    Here is a more gentle treatment of the image with gentler black and white points and some adjustment of gamma to retain the soft pencil sketch look.
    kirk
     

  7. Like
    kirkt got a reaction from Alfred in Bethanie   
    Here is a more gentle treatment of the image with gentler black and white points and some adjustment of gamma to retain the soft pencil sketch look.
    kirk
     

  8. Like
    kirkt got a reaction from Alfred in Bethanie   
    Hi @bethanie - to bring the white paper background to solid white and to add contrast to the image, you need to set your white and black points to get the effect you desire.  In the first attached screenshot, take a look at the histogram of your image.  The large peak on the right of the histogram at "a" is all of the near-white pixels of the paper background and its texture.  The large gap at the left of the histogram at "b" is telling you that there are no pure black or near black pixels in the image.  To push the near-white pixels of the paper and its texture to white, you want to set the white level of the image to an RGB value less than those pixels - this will make the near-white background completely white and remove the texture of the paper as well.  It will also add contrast.  To add more contrast, set the black level to something lighter than pure black - this will make the lighter black tones darker.  
    There are several ways to do this, but the most straightforward way is with a Levels adjustment layer.  In the second screenshot, I moved the white point in to 84% of pure white and moved the black point to 21% of pure black.  This squeezes out the near-white pixels of the background to pure white and pushes the lighter dark tones closer to pure black.  You can also use the Gamma slider to control the midtones.  Take a look at the histogram of the after image  -all of those near-white pixels are now clipped to pure white and the light black pixels are now near the left edge of the histogram. This is also known as histogram stretching.
    If the effect is too harsh and starts to bleed into the pencil shading, you can back the white and black levels off back toward their respective original values (100 and 0).
    Kirk 


  9. Thanks
    kirkt got a reaction from jmwellborn in Bethanie   
    Hi @bethanie - to bring the white paper background to solid white and to add contrast to the image, you need to set your white and black points to get the effect you desire.  In the first attached screenshot, take a look at the histogram of your image.  The large peak on the right of the histogram at "a" is all of the near-white pixels of the paper background and its texture.  The large gap at the left of the histogram at "b" is telling you that there are no pure black or near black pixels in the image.  To push the near-white pixels of the paper and its texture to white, you want to set the white level of the image to an RGB value less than those pixels - this will make the near-white background completely white and remove the texture of the paper as well.  It will also add contrast.  To add more contrast, set the black level to something lighter than pure black - this will make the lighter black tones darker.  
    There are several ways to do this, but the most straightforward way is with a Levels adjustment layer.  In the second screenshot, I moved the white point in to 84% of pure white and moved the black point to 21% of pure black.  This squeezes out the near-white pixels of the background to pure white and pushes the lighter dark tones closer to pure black.  You can also use the Gamma slider to control the midtones.  Take a look at the histogram of the after image  -all of those near-white pixels are now clipped to pure white and the light black pixels are now near the left edge of the histogram. This is also known as histogram stretching.
    If the effect is too harsh and starts to bleed into the pencil shading, you can back the white and black levels off back toward their respective original values (100 and 0).
    Kirk 


  10. Like
    kirkt got a reaction from Old Bruce in Help please issue with RAW files   
    Magenta highlights In clipped areas occur when the green channel clips (red+blue = magenta) and the raw converter assumes an incorrect sensor saturation value. This is a problem on the raw converter side. Try changing the raw converter used, in the Develop Assistant. 
     
    kirk
  11. Like
    kirkt got a reaction from kirk23 in Node-based UI for AP. Please?   
    Exactly.  This is the model I would love to see Affinity follow.  I have no problem with nodes that render the output to a low-res proxy throughout the node tree.  This speeds up the editing process and gets you where you need to be so that you can then put a full res output node at the end of the tree.  Blender is terrific for so many reasons and is an example of how an application can evolve with feedback from an incredibly diverse user base and a bunch of really talented designers and programmers who have support.
    I am also a fan of Photoline, for many reasons, but the interface can be klunky and a little obtuse, which adds to the learning curve. 
    Kirk (t, not 23 - LOL - how many times does a Kirk run into another Kirk?!  I've met three in my lifetime.  Now, virtually, four.)
  12. Like
    kirkt reacted to walt.farrell in Where are the basic keyboard shortcuts?   
    And it is, but that list is for text shortcuts, and applies only when the text editing cursor is within text (Frame Text or Artistic Text) or a text tool is active. Then the text shortcuts override other shortcuts. Those text shortcuts are built-in for processing text, are not available for the user to reassign, and do not appear in the Keyboard Shortuts Preferences.
  13. Thanks
    kirkt got a reaction from amunaptra2001 in Harris Shutter Effect   
    You can also do this with fewer steps using the Apply Image command and Equations.  For this example, assume that you have a new document open, with the three source images layered in it.  The first layer will be the image that will give us the RED channel for the Harris composite - call this layer RED.  Same for the other two layers, call them GREEN (second layer) and BLUE (third layer).  On the top of the layer stack, create a new pixel layer called HARRIS - make sure you fill the Alpha channel (select the HARRIS layer, then in the Channels palette, right-click on HARRIS Alpha and select "Fill" to make the Alpha channel filled with white).
    Now the fun begins.
    1) If it is not the active layer, select the HARRIS Layer to make it active - this is going to be the layer upon which the Apply Image filter operates, so it needs to be the active layer before invoking the Apply Image command.
    2) Select Filters > Apply Image...
    3a) For this step, we are going to place the red channel from the RED image layer into the red channel of the HARRIS layer.  To do this, drag the RED layer from the Layers palette onto the upper area in the Apply Image dialog to make the RED layer the source for the Apply Image operation.
    3b) Next, check the "Equations" box and make sure the Equation Color Space is set to RGB.  In the equations boxes below, you are going to specify the channels for the HARRIS layer (the "Destination" layer)  based on the channels in the RED layer (the "Source" layer).  In this step, we want to place the red channel from RED into the red channel of HARRIS, and leave the green and blue channels of HARRIS alone.  To do this, we enter the following equations:
    DR = SR
    DG = DG
    DB = DB
    That is, the Destination Red (DR) channel (the red channel of HARRIS) equals the Source Red (SR) channel (the red channel of RED).  Note that the DG = DG and DB = DB equations basically mean that the Destination Green (and Blue) equals whatever it already is (in this case, nothing).
    3c) Repeat 3b for the GREEN and BLUE layers as sources for their respective channels in the HARRIS layer.  So, for the green channel of the HARRIS layer, make sure HARRIS is the active layer, select Filter > Apply Image..., drag the GREEN layer onto the Apply Image dialog, check the Equations box and enter:
    DR = DR (leave red alone)
    DG = SG (place the green from the Source [GREEN] into the Destination [HARRIS])
    DB = DB (leave blue alone).
    For the blue channel in HARRIS, drag the BLUE layer onto the Apply Image dialog - the equations will be:
    DR = DR
    DG = DG
    DB = SB
    Taa daaah!  This is a more elegant method, but if you do not understand how to use Apply Image, it can be very confusing.
    Kirk
     
  14. Thanks
    kirkt got a reaction from amunaptra2001 in Harris Shutter Effect   
    @stitch - To create the Harris Shutter effect, you need to take three images and put the red channel from the first, the green channel from the second, and the blue channel from the third into a single document.  Objects in all of the images that are stationary with respect to the frame will appear as normal, full color; objects that move relative to the frame will create a rainbow-like offset effect.  To do this, you can import the three images onto three layers in your working document. Then you can select the red channel from the first layer, the green channel from the second layer and the blue channel from the third layer, for example, and place them into their respective channels on a new pixel layer.  This is done easily using spare channels.  Create a spare channel from the RED of the first image and rename it "RED."  Create a spare channel from the GREEN of the second image layer and rename it "GREEN" and create a spare channel from the BLUE channel of the third image layer and rename it "BLUE."  Then, make a new pixel layer and make it the active layer in the stack - let's call this layer "Harris."  Right-click on the RED spare channel and select "Load to Harris Red" - repeat for the GREEN and BLUE spare channels, selecting "Load to Harris (GREEN or BLUE).
    In the attached example, I took the red channel from the first image, the green channel from the second image and the blue channel from the third image and combined them as outlined above to produce the Harris Shutter result.
    Kirk

  15. Like
    kirkt got a reaction from sfriedberg in Harris Shutter Effect   
    You can also do this with fewer steps using the Apply Image command and Equations.  For this example, assume that you have a new document open, with the three source images layered in it.  The first layer will be the image that will give us the RED channel for the Harris composite - call this layer RED.  Same for the other two layers, call them GREEN (second layer) and BLUE (third layer).  On the top of the layer stack, create a new pixel layer called HARRIS - make sure you fill the Alpha channel (select the HARRIS layer, then in the Channels palette, right-click on HARRIS Alpha and select "Fill" to make the Alpha channel filled with white).
    Now the fun begins.
    1) If it is not the active layer, select the HARRIS Layer to make it active - this is going to be the layer upon which the Apply Image filter operates, so it needs to be the active layer before invoking the Apply Image command.
    2) Select Filters > Apply Image...
    3a) For this step, we are going to place the red channel from the RED image layer into the red channel of the HARRIS layer.  To do this, drag the RED layer from the Layers palette onto the upper area in the Apply Image dialog to make the RED layer the source for the Apply Image operation.
    3b) Next, check the "Equations" box and make sure the Equation Color Space is set to RGB.  In the equations boxes below, you are going to specify the channels for the HARRIS layer (the "Destination" layer)  based on the channels in the RED layer (the "Source" layer).  In this step, we want to place the red channel from RED into the red channel of HARRIS, and leave the green and blue channels of HARRIS alone.  To do this, we enter the following equations:
    DR = SR
    DG = DG
    DB = DB
    That is, the Destination Red (DR) channel (the red channel of HARRIS) equals the Source Red (SR) channel (the red channel of RED).  Note that the DG = DG and DB = DB equations basically mean that the Destination Green (and Blue) equals whatever it already is (in this case, nothing).
    3c) Repeat 3b for the GREEN and BLUE layers as sources for their respective channels in the HARRIS layer.  So, for the green channel of the HARRIS layer, make sure HARRIS is the active layer, select Filter > Apply Image..., drag the GREEN layer onto the Apply Image dialog, check the Equations box and enter:
    DR = DR (leave red alone)
    DG = SG (place the green from the Source [GREEN] into the Destination [HARRIS])
    DB = DB (leave blue alone).
    For the blue channel in HARRIS, drag the BLUE layer onto the Apply Image dialog - the equations will be:
    DR = DR
    DG = DG
    DB = SB
    Taa daaah!  This is a more elegant method, but if you do not understand how to use Apply Image, it can be very confusing.
    Kirk
     
  16. Like
    kirkt got a reaction from sfriedberg in Harris Shutter Effect   
    @stitch - To create the Harris Shutter effect, you need to take three images and put the red channel from the first, the green channel from the second, and the blue channel from the third into a single document.  Objects in all of the images that are stationary with respect to the frame will appear as normal, full color; objects that move relative to the frame will create a rainbow-like offset effect.  To do this, you can import the three images onto three layers in your working document. Then you can select the red channel from the first layer, the green channel from the second layer and the blue channel from the third layer, for example, and place them into their respective channels on a new pixel layer.  This is done easily using spare channels.  Create a spare channel from the RED of the first image and rename it "RED."  Create a spare channel from the GREEN of the second image layer and rename it "GREEN" and create a spare channel from the BLUE channel of the third image layer and rename it "BLUE."  Then, make a new pixel layer and make it the active layer in the stack - let's call this layer "Harris."  Right-click on the RED spare channel and select "Load to Harris Red" - repeat for the GREEN and BLUE spare channels, selecting "Load to Harris (GREEN or BLUE).
    In the attached example, I took the red channel from the first image, the green channel from the second image and the blue channel from the third image and combined them as outlined above to produce the Harris Shutter result.
    Kirk

  17. Like
    kirkt reacted to DarkClown in Changing dialog values via mouse cursor   
    @kirkt: True, the precision gets better with higher zoom factor. And of course I do the adjustments in 100%. But this is by far not high enough to be able to steer the slider precise enough. The problem is significantly increased by the fact that BOTH axis are the base to the value (it would ba a lot easier if only the x-axis would be the parameter). Eventually it's a lot easier to just click the slider itself and adjust the value this way.
  18. Like
    kirkt reacted to David in Яuislip in Harris Shutter Effect   
    kirkt beat me to it
    Here's a quick macro that does just that

    It needs three images which must be rasterised Pixel layers. It copies the Red channel from the lowest layer, the Green from the middle, the Blue from the top.
    Then it creates a new Pixel layer called Final, pastes the channels into that then deletes the spare channels
    You'll get different effects by reordering the layers before running the macro
    Hours of fun!
    dcHarrisShutter.afmacro
  19. Thanks
    kirkt got a reaction from Old Bruce in defringe worked once   
    Also - when you are defringing something, you are really targeting a specific photographic issue that occurs at high-contrast edges of objects with optics that do not focus the spectrum of light evenly on the sensor.  Find an example of fringing (chromatic aberration) and test the filter on it - you will find that it does a pretty good job.  In the image you posted, there is no fringing, which may be causing some of your frustration.
    Kirk
  20. Like
    kirkt reacted to - S - in Affinity Photo file names change insanely.   
    Unfortunately, that is how it is.  
    Affinity Photo automatically writes the filename directly into the 'Title' field in the file metadata – meaning the original filename is stuck as the title in the metadata, even if the file is later renamed.
    If you're only dealing with a small number of files, then in your 'Blue_10.afphoto' example you can delete 'Blue_10' from the 'Title' field in the Affinity Photo Metadata panel.  Then when you save the file as 'Green_20.afphoto', the title will be blank.  However, if you are dealing with lots of photos, it's a PITA.
    I previously submitted feedback regarding this behaviour, however I wouldn't hold my breath on them changing it.
    https://forum.affinity.serif.com/index.php?/topic/114156-affinity-photo-shouldnt-automatically-write-the-filename-directly-into-the-title-metadata/
     
  21. Thanks
    kirkt got a reaction from justinpbrown71 in APhoto - How Can I Change All Instances Of A Picked Colour?   
    I assume you are working with a pixel-based image (as opposed to a vector image - you mentioned "instances" but I am assuming that these are not separate objects).  The sparks are the brightest parts of the image and are well-defined, so you can make a mask where the sparks are white and everything else is black.
    Then make a rectangle with the rectangle tool and fill it with the color you want (or a gradient, or whatever) and apply the mask.  Set the blend mode of the rectangle layer to something like Linear Light.  See example attached - I used a gradient.  Because you use a rectangle shape (instead of filling a pixel layer) you can edit the fill once it is initially laid down, or change it to another fill type (color to a gradient, etc.).
    Is this what you are going for?
    Kirk

  22. Like
    kirkt reacted to R C-R in How to reduce colors in Photos to create C64 looking Photos?!   
    Thanks for creating the 2 HALD images. If I understand this correctly, they are 'level 10' HALD's; which means using the AP Inferred LUT with them will interpolate a great many pixel colors in the photo that do not exactly match any of those in the HALD pair, which results in a lot more colors than in the C=64 palette. (I am probably describing this poorly but I hope you understand what I mean.)
    That is why to get closer to the actual C=64 palette it is necessary to posterize the result, but it still does not perfectly reduce the colors to that palette. It is easy to see this if the AP Create Palette from Document function is used -- typically there will be several dozen colors in that palette. So maybe a "level 16" version of the HALD pair would do the reduction to 16 colors perfectly?
    Even so, as @Medical Officer Bones mentioned, that still would not create an 'authentic' C=64 look because it does not account for the tiling limitations of that machine.
    The ConsoleCam app you mentioned looks like the easiest way to get an authentic C=64 look, but of course it requires an iPad or iPhone to use it. Since I do have an iPad, I tried it out on a 1280x960 px vacation photo I shot with an old Olympus point & shoot camera. Even reduced here to the C=64 320x200 resolution, it is easy to see how extreme the limitations of that old 'retro' look actually were.

  23. Like
    kirkt got a reaction from R C-R in How to reduce colors in Photos to create C64 looking Photos?!   
    There's also an iPhone app which allows you to choose from several old consoles and computer systems from back in the day:
    https://apps.apple.com/us/app/consolecam/id1496896085
    kirk
    Attached is the output of the ConsoleCam app, for the C64 hi resolution machine, with the "less detail" setting enabled.

  24. Thanks
    kirkt got a reaction from R C-R in How to reduce colors in Photos to create C64 looking Photos?!   
    @Rongkongcoma - Here is a HALD Identity Image run through the Python code to which @R C-R linked.  In AP, you can use the HALD identity image and its transformed mate as a pair of images in a LUT adjustment layer using "Infer LUT."  Otherwise, you can run your image through the Python code and it will transform the image itself. 
    To control the distribution of color, I would add a Posterize adjustment layer below the LUT layer.
    kirk
    Attached images:
    1) "lookup1024.png" the identity image
    2) "paletteC64_first.png" - the transformed identity image mapped to the C64 color palette.
     
    FYI - the code looks at the R, G and B values of each pixel and then figures out the distances from that color to the 16 colors in the C64 palette.  It then sorts the list of distances and saves the C64 palette color associated with the closest distance to the pixel's color.


  25. Like
    kirkt got a reaction from Alfred in APhoto - How Can I Change All Instances Of A Picked Colour?   
    I assume you are working with a pixel-based image (as opposed to a vector image - you mentioned "instances" but I am assuming that these are not separate objects).  The sparks are the brightest parts of the image and are well-defined, so you can make a mask where the sparks are white and everything else is black.
    Then make a rectangle with the rectangle tool and fill it with the color you want (or a gradient, or whatever) and apply the mask.  Set the blend mode of the rectangle layer to something like Linear Light.  See example attached - I used a gradient.  Because you use a rectangle shape (instead of filling a pixel layer) you can edit the fill once it is initially laid down, or change it to another fill type (color to a gradient, etc.).
    Is this what you are going for?
    Kirk

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