AdamStanislav

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About AdamStanislav

  • Rank
    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 04/23/1950

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Originally from Slovakia

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140 profile views
  1. My SVG viewer? I always view my SVG files in several viewers, including two different web browsers as well as opening the SVG in Affinity Designer. All I am asking is how do I turn your color management off. Just put the same colors into the SVG file that I have chosen for the .afdesign file.
  2. This is so frustrating. When I create a new document, AD insists on managing my colors. Why? Why, why, why?! My monitor is properly calibrated and the system (Windows 10) driver manages the colors. But AD thinks I want it to manage the colors, too. So, after carefully choosing the right look, and exporting the image to SVG or other format, the result looks disastrous. Why is AD doing this? And how do I turn it off? There seems to be no way to turn it off. There is a myriad of options for a profile, but there is no do nothing option.
  3. Thanks for that information!
  4. Thank you, though I’d be surprised if most Affinity users were even members of the forum. It would make more sense for the software itself to check it automatically every so often and/or have an option to check for the latest version from the Help menu. Anyway, I have version 1.5.1.43. Is it the latest? Because the announcement only mentions 1.5.1, but not the fourth number.
  5. There’s a patch? How do we find out about it, and where do we get the patch from?
  6. Maybe for the average person. But if you know how to get to the services (e.g., press Win+x, then g, then select Services and Applications, then Services), you can scroll down to Windows Update, stop the service (if running) and disable it. And then, when/if you want to check for updates, enable it, turn it on, check for updates, stop the service and disable it again.
  7. This entire use of pixel units makes no sense to me. AD is a vector graphic design software program. There is no concept of a pixel in a vector graphic. Strictly speaking there are no points, either. There is not even a size in a vector graphic. There are just some abstract relative units; relative to the overall graphic, not to anything in the physical world. Only when a vector graphic is being rendered, whether to a bitmap image, or a vinyl cut, or whatever else, do physical units enter the equation. But they are different for different renders.
  8. Mark, just because it isn’t an Affinity error message does not mean it is not caused by something inside Affinity. TLS is a protocol used by encrypted communications over the Internet. Since AD always checks if there is a new Beta available, it is perfectly conceivable this message is related to Affinity, albeit indirectly. If anything, it should not be causing a fatal error in Affinity. See this link on TLS under Windows.
  9. Let’s not forget that the entire idea of what is white is relative. There are many objects we call white, but if we placed them next to each other, we’d see they often are quite different. No matter how white something is, we can always think of a whiter object. Our brains know it and adjust for it automatically, even for those who are completely oblivious to the relativity of colors (on the other hand, digital cameras either need to have their white point set, or contain some software that sets it automatically, though not quite as successfully as our brains). In graphic design it is very important to keep that in mind. I have always been puzzled why various flags depicted on wikipedia in the SVG format use #fff as white. Why puzzled? Because that is also the color of the background of wikipedia pages. As a result, the white portion of such flags simply become “invisible” because they are indistinguishable from the background. Please, don’t just take my word for it. Take a look at the Flag of Russia on wikipedia. What it actually looks like is as if it had two colors, blue and red, though placed lower than the top of the page. Compare that to the Flag of Russia I made back in early August. It has all three colors, white, blue and red, all clearly visible despite its white background because I used #F7F7F7 for the white stripe. That AD programmers have chosen a default other than #FFFFFF shows they understand the problem. Good for them!
  10. Ahoj, Miloš. Take a look at FontForge, which works on all current operating systems.
  11. Back when I started Beta testing AD for Windows (which seems like a long time ago, even though it was not :)), naturally, I went through all the official AD tutorials on Serif’s web site (and some unofficial ones on YouTube) to see what it can do, so I know what to test. Having watched them all, some more than once, I concentrated on the testing. Well, just today, I went back to the Serif tutorial pages and was pleasantly surprised to find a number of new tutorials specific to v.1.5. They have added many nice new features I didn’t know about. If you have not visited the tutorial pages lately, I suggest you do so. Not just so you can get impressed (which you will), but so you know what new things you may want/need to test, since of course if we don’t know about some of the features, we won’t Beta test them. Adam P.S. No doubt some of the people reading this work for Serif’s competition. That’s fine, of course. I do, however, want to suggest you make sure to be seated when you go visit the newest tutorials, as you may get quite dizzy seeing all the new ideas and things. :P
  12. I thought it was Michelangelo Buonarotti telling that to Pope Julius II. :P Or should I say Charlton Heston to Rex Harrison (The Agony and the Ecstasy, 1965)?
  13. Hey! It’s not the programmers’ fault when the companies they work for rush things to production before being ready. Serif is clearly one of the few companies that let their programmers do their job right.
  14. I actually like the lack of details in this image. It adds to the dark mystery and sneakiness of what it portrays. It came, it abducted, it vanished. Bam! Not enough time for anyone to notice any details. Well done, tro!