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JPEG is very efficient for photographic images, but since it's a lossy format you should only export to JPEG when the image is in its final form. The larger the format of the collage, the lower the resolution you can get away with (because no one is normally going to view a large picture from very close up).

 

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Hi Fraser,

I have made such a collage ... no expert mind I was asked by a friend to crate a collage of photos she took with alphabetical letters as her insperation  .. that's the English alphabet, be interesting trying to get the letters Ö Ä Ü in photographic form .. now there's a project.

Anyway..... I had a bunch of RAW files from her and used Affinity photo to create the collage; I found working in 32bit (HDR) colour format for each file made for a truely massive .afphoto best to export to 8 bit JPEG highest quality .. still big files .. or 16 bit Tiff files if you have the computer to handle the massive files.

I worked in the highest resolution my computer could handle with the converted RAW filies into 16bit Tiff files then I created my collage .... we are talking a simply huge .afphoto file .. then when done I exported the final document as an 8bit jpeg file best quality.

Thus the workflow was to maintian the highest resolution until the end export for printing .. that's another story ..

Hope that helps and if there are any experts out there who want to give thier wisdom I'd be grateful :-D

Reg.

Please don't mistake my opinion for expert comment :) for no way no how am I an expert on anything. However I am curious and willing to learn. 

 

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Hi Alfred and Reggie. Thank you both very much for your insight. I have been saving them as TIFF files, so that's good to know. I'm a bit confused about outputting to JPEG for a large print though Alfred. Wouldn't TIFF be a better way to go as the resolution is higher, despite the fact that people would view them from far away?

 

Cheers!

 

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I’m not sure what you’re saying, Fraser, unless you’re using the term ‘resolution’ to mean something different from what I understand it to mean in this context. :/

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11 hours ago, frasercameron said:

Wouldn't TIFF be a better way to go as the resolution is higher, despite the fact that people would view them from far away?

The issue here is how much detail human vision can resolve, which varies with viewing distance. Technically, determining that accurately is very complicated (see for example this discussion about how differently cameras & humans "see" things) but basically it comes down to determining the approximate distance where we can no longer see individual pixels, or for lossy formats like JPEG where we can no longer see the artifacts lossy compression causes, like blurred edges, ringing, & halos.

 

The bottom line is including more detail than we can see at a given viewing distance won't make anything better. 

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You should use the native format of the software you use: Photoshop = PSD (TIFF), Affinity Photo = afphoto, ...

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Another nice format is JPG2000, but it is not supported by most vendors. It has better compression than JPG and it is losless.

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  • 1 year later...
On 2/14/2018 at 1:09 PM, Petar Petrenko said:

Another nice format is JPG2000, but it is not supported by most vendors. It has better compression than JPG and it is losless.

I +1 this one, because Google PageSpeed is asking for.... "JPEG 2000, JPEG XR, and WebP" and penalises you if you use plain JPG or PNG.

Cheers,

Helmar

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