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Found 101 results

  1. Dear Affinity Support Team, I just bought Affinity Photo and am truly impressed by its functionality and ease of use. I really love the software, however I realized there is probably one minor defect in displaying images (if it can be termed that way)... My setup (SW, HW). I'm using Affinity Photo 1.6.5.135 on Windows 10 Pro, on a Lenovo ThinkPad T560 laptop with Intel i7-6600 and 16 GB RAM. I'm using the built-in computer screen along with an external screen (Eizo FlexScan EV2335W), both color-profiled using my X-Rite i1 Display Pro. The problem. Affinity Photo seems to only display colors of my pictures correctly on my built-in screen. As soon as I move the Affinity window to my other screen, the colors become slightly shifted and inaccurate. I mostly work with 16-bit TIFF images using ProPhotoRGB (ROMM RGB); and I even set the global Affinity Photo settings accordingly (Edit --> Preferences --> Colour --> ...); however, this problem shows up even if I open sRGB images. I wasn't able to iterate to a correct color representation on my external screen no matter what color profile I assigned to the document (picture). The only thing that appeared to help was to simply move the Affinity Photo window to my built-in screen. Side notes. I many times noticed that many application and even Windows itself tends to have issues with this, each in its own way. For example, mspaint.exe is always way off on any of my screens (way too dark and muted) from the point of applying color profiles to my screens, while another application I use (XnView) displays it always correctly. Capture One, DxO PhotoLab and even Adobe Photoshop also display images correctly and consistently on both screens. Also, I wasn't able to document this using screenshots, as that happens to capture the colors consistently, as they show up on my built-in monitor; however, when I compared the same file opened by Affinity Photo and XnView, the incorrect color shift on Affinity Photo was apparent (more purple-ish colors in my case). I would appreciate your advice in case I'm doing something wrong or in case I missed some important configuration options to adjust. In the mean time it would even help if I could reconfigure Windows together with Affinity Photo to use my secondary screen's ICC profile as the default one, since that one is more suited for image editing. Thank you in advance. Best regards, mk0x55
  2. my NEF for me is in SRGB, or Adobe-RGB, in the APN! (some APN have different raw Nikon D4 is in YcbCr, linear mode ) S for small, I choose adobe RGB, L*a*b* is a large Space In fact, the only solution, for this RVB linear => L*a*b* we must have this intermediate step (step visible or not ... ) a linear space to l*a*b* Unlucky no XYZ option in my APN and in Aph. OK I choose a linear profile Romm (prophoto like) or, adobe linear or a icc linear generate by xrite after calibration is better ? Here Developp > basic > Profiles the last item below Developp and after switch to L*a*b* See https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ERcKNCIhmUg&feature=youtu.be Yess, I see ROMM RGB is define for 8/16 bit… I think at this time on one side we have the space Linear, If mode is linear we could applied the transformation and on other side colour precision 8 or 16 or 32 bit. other link very interesting, see this with APh, if you use L*a*b*, you know the importance of the gray layer Human are https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Middle_gray The human eye knows better how to distinguish different luminosities than different colors (more technically, it has a better luminance resolution than chrominance).
  3. I just updated to Affinity Photo 1.7 In the previous version of Affinity Photo in Develop Persona you had the option of choosing romm RGB Profiles in the pull down menu. What happen to it? Do you have to reload it some other way? Never mind....I was able to load the ROMM RGB into Develop Persona Profiles
  4. If I remember correctly APh Develop Persona uses a ROMM RGB like mathematical color space when processing RAW files, though some former forum member then showed/proved in the past, that only the sRGB gamut seems to have been used always instead. But I don't know if in the meantime things have been fixed or changed here in this regard during APh version updates. - However, since RAW images do not have color info at pixels and so are not in any color-space (instead they have color primaries corresponding to the wavelengths that the Bayer filter on each pixel defines), using an RGB based color space (even a wider gamut one) in/during RAW development limits the overall possible and theoretical available color spectrum. Thus RAW -> LAB should offer more possibilities than RAW -> RGB -> LAB here from the beginning.
  5. (I have already sort of asked this question here, but not got a reply yet, so I’m revising it). I inadvertently had ROMM RGB set instead of sRGB in AP colour setting preferences (sorry, haven’t got AP open at present, but I mean in the setting near the top of the menu). When opening a TIFF in AP, which had been converted from a Canon .Cr2 in Canon DPP, or from a Fuji .RAF in Silkypix (these TIFFs being 8 bit sRGB), the colour looked fine. But if I opened a TIFF (again, 8 bit, sRGB) which I’d processed using DxO PhotoLab 2, the colour was awful and very over-saturated. But if I opened the same TIFF directly into AP by launching the “Export to application” function, the colour looked fine. I wonder why? It looks as though maybe opening the file from within AP makes the software use the ROMM profile, but launching AP from within PL2 somehow ignores it? (Everything is fine now I’ve changed the profile from ROMM to sRGB, I’m just curious about this issue).
  6. I looked in the forums and google but i couldn't really find a solid answer. Im working on an album cover and normally for all my work (regardless of if i plan to print or not i) just set it to "print" when i open a new document. I may have fiddled a bit with the profiles in the past but i cant remember what the default is. does it make any difference?
  7. I don’t know whether I am doing something wrong or what is going on. My problem: convert a raw file in DxO PL2 (doesn’t matter whether it is a Canon or (old, non-X-trans) Fuji. The tiff is exported as 8 bit and sRGB. If I open these tiffs in Photoshop Elements 2019, they are fine. If I open with Affinity, the colours are weird and grossly over-saturated. This is almost the reverse of the known issue with Viveza and Affinity. If I process the raws in Affinity, the colour closely matches what I get from PhotoLab. (The colour rendering in Affinity of Canon raws converted to tiffs in Canon DPP, and of Fuji raws converted to tiff in Fuji/Silkypix, is not problematic). ADDED I have now discovered that this only happens when I open a tiff by browsing to the file within Affinity. If I use the “Export to application” command in PhotoLab, and choose Affinity Photo this way, the program opens and displays the colour correctly! ADDED I have discovered that I’d got the RGB Colour Profile set to ROMM RGB in error. Presumably launching AP from within DxO causes the program to display the tiff as sRGB, but opening AP and then opening the file causes it to display as ROMM.
  8. Chris B

    Mapping

    Hey ms.fuentecilla, Does this happen if you try using other ICC profiles or just ROMM RGB? Do you have a monitor that supports the wider gamut with ROMM RGB? I've tried a few different raw files from a Sony but not your specific model so a sample image would be appreciated.
  9. I use to use ProPhoto RGB as my working space. Should I choose ROMM RGB now at Preferences>Colour (AFF.Photo)? Thank you.
  10. Chris B

    color issue with panoramas

    Hey Fritz_H, Do you have a monitor that can correctly display the wider gamut from the ROMM RGB profile? If I use ROMM RGB on my 4k Dell panel the colours look way too saturated—almost like I'm using a LUT or filter. My iMac handles this much better than the 4k Dell panel I'm using.
  11. Fritz_H

    color issue with panoramas

    @Chris B Thanks for your reply. In the meanwhile I found out, that the color-issue only occurs, when Color-Prefs are set to ROMM RGB - regardless if the Input-Pictures are JPG or RAW (NRW). Maybe I misunderstood this Video on YT: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hx-l7Avm8Bs (Published early June 2019) Since I saw this I switched my working-profiles to ROMM RGB to take advantage of the wider color-spectrum when working with RAW... On the other hand: When I open the panorama-pictures individually the Sky-Color is displayed correctly: Strangely I did not notice any of these color-Issues with Versions of Photo prior to 1.7.2.x In case I am not smart enough to understand all this color-management-stuff: just say it Scaled down Test-Images attached. kind regards Fritz
  12. First, a RAW image does not have a color profile. It is simply the raw sensor data; what the camera saw. Any clipping would occur during the Develop process, when Photo creates a developed image from the RAW image. At that time, the settings in the Develop Assistant determine whether Photo produces a 16-bit RGB image or a 32-bit RGB image. In Preferences/Color you can specify the color profile to use with 8- or 16-bit RGB images, and you can specify the color profile to use with 32-bit RGB images. When you press Develop, Photo produces an image as specified in the Develop Assistant (16-bit RGB or 32-bit RGB). Before you press Develop, while operating in the Develop Persona, Photo will display and (I think) operate on the image using the color profile specified in Preferences/Color for the kind of image that will be produced when you press Develop. So, for example, if I have told the Develop Assistant to produce a 16-bit RGB image, and I have told Preferences/Color that my preferred color profile for 16-bit images is sRGB IEC61966-2.1, then the Develop Persona will be operating with that profile applied to my RAW image. At least, that's my current understanding, and if I open a RAW image with those settings, and look in the Develop Persona's Info Panel, it says that sRGB IEC61966-2.1 is being used. On the other hand, if I have told the Develop Assistant to produce a 32-bit RGB image, and I have told Preferences/Color that my preferred color profile for 32-bit images is "ROMM RGB: ISO22028-2:2013 (Linear)" then the Develop Persona will operate with that profile applied to my RAW image. If I open a RAW image with those settings, the Info Panel will say that the image profile is "ROMM RGB: ISO22028-2:2013 (Linear)". As ROMM-RGB is a much wider gamut profile than sRGB, less clipping will occur when I press Develop. Of course, even in case 2, at some point I will have to display or print the image. At that point, the characteristics of the output device come into play, and further clipping may occur.
  13. Hi Geddy, we do ship what is effectively a ProPhoto RGB profile with the Affinity apps but it’s called ROMM RGB. You can safely use that in the knowledge that it’s ProPhoto. The ProPhoto profile on your HP machine will likely have been installed with other software—I gather you might not have installed that same software on your Surface? Hope that helps!
  14. James Ritson

    color issue with panoramas

    The Panorama merge operation should get its document colour profile from what is mandated in the image's metadata—this is often sRGB or Adobe RGB. I've just tested with my default RGB Colour Profile option set to ROMM RGB, but the panorama stitch correctly uses sRGB instead since the images are in that colour space. This is on Mac—perhaps it's not working as intended on Windows 1.7.2?
  15. It's likely because your original document is using a ProPhoto RGB (ROMM RGB: ISO 22028-2.2013) document colour profile. Then whatever you're viewing the exported PNG file with is probably ignoring or stripping the ROMM RGB colour profile and assuming that the document colour profile is sRGB. For this particular document try clicking the 'More' button in the PNG export settings, setting the 'ICC Profile' to 'sRGB IEC61966-2.1' and ticking 'Embed ICC Profile'. This will try to export it as sRGB as best as possible—however it will still likely be different to the original. It would better to start off with the document colour profile set to 'sRGB IEC61966-2.1' when you first create the new document.
  16. I have a color cast issue, in Affinity Photo 1.7.1.404, that I am trying to explain, in terms of the cause. I use Nik Silver to generate B&W pixel layers. Most of the time I am using RGB16, ProPhoto. I was working on an image and noticed green and red in a layer that should be grayscale! I have two computers, with dual monitors - all calibrated with Xrite. I used the color picker to confirm that the RGB values are the same, so the areas are gray, but the display is not! The layer is the output from Nik SilverFX, without any toning applied. I changed the pixel layer to grayscale, then the color bands disappeared. I then tried various color spaces. Strangely, the color cast that manifests in ProPhoto is removed if I switch to sRGB: I then gave ROMM a shot, but the color cast returns: I then tried LAB16 and HDR32 - no color cast (I didn't upload the HDR32 example): I am trying to understand what's going on, and how to explain the display output, at least to myself. But, I can't since I don't really know what's at issue. I also exported the file, about 572 MB, as a PSD, then opened it in PS CS6. I don't see the color casts, banding of red and green in PS. So, I am inclined to conclude that: -it's not a hardware issue, as the banding shows up on two different computers (Nvidia or Intel graphics; Windows 10 Pro; four different monitors - all Xrite calibrated, recently) -is a software issue, probably related to Affinity Photo or Nik, since the color space does impact the display within AP. ProPhoto and ROMM seem to have the same issues. Output files (JPG, PNG, TIFF) do not show the color issues. I generally Develop into ProPhoto 16-bit, to start, and only switch to sRGB and/or 8-bit on export. I searched the forum content and could not find a similar color space issue. Perhaps I don't know which terms will produce the similar issues? Thanks for any suggestions, Greg
  17. Hopefully this can clarify the issue and also clear up the concerns that Photo is discarding or throwing away anything outside of sRGB: RAW files opened in Develop go through an image processing pipeline, during which the colour information is extracted and processed—the colour space used for these operations is ROMM RGB because it provides a suitably large resolution and enables colour values to be saturated and manipulated without clipping to white. This choice of colour space was introduced in version 1.5 where there was a marked improvement in RAW files with intense colour values (e.g. artificial lighting). However, the actual document profile is in sRGB—this means the final colour values sent to the screen are restricted to sRGB. Is this deficient? Yes, and there have been discussions about how to tackle it without risking further complication for people who don't use wide colour profiles. There is a silver lining though. RAW files are developed in an unbounded (float) colour space, which means all the values that fall outside of sRGB are not clipped or discarded. If you were to then set your output profile to a larger colour space like ROMM RGB, these out of bound values can be accommodated by the larger resolution of that colour space. Essentially, you can avoid clipping values outside of sRGB when clicking Develop, and you can get them back once you're in the Photo Persona: the issue is that you can't see these values within the Develop Persona. I've experimented with one of my photographs of some intense lighting to back this up, and have attached it to this post for people to experiment with. I've also compared the results versus Photoshop CC 2019 (where you can set the colour space and it will actually affect the view transform) and, minor processing differences aside such as sharpness and lens distortion, have been able to match the intensity of colours. For Photoshop I also used ROMM RGB and increased saturation directly in the Camera Raw module. Here's the RAW file for you to try out: _1190462.RW2 Steps for this experiment: Enable Shadows/Highlights and drag the Highlights slider to -100%. Avoid any colour or saturation adjustments, add other adjustments to taste (e.g. noise reduction). Enable the Profiles option and set the output profile to ROMM RGB. Click Develop. Once in the Photo Persona, add an HSL adjustment and increase Saturation all the way. You'll be able to dramatically saturate the image without losing resolution. If you close and re-open the RAW file and try to increase the saturation within Develop, you'll notice that the colour values are restricted to sRGB—however, even with values at the limit of sRGB, you can still set the output profile to ROMM RGB and then increase them further once in the Photo Persona. And below are two images, one still in ROMM RGB, the other converted to sRGB. I'm not sure how they will display on the forum (and whether the forum software will process and convert the colour profile—hopefully not!) but feel free to download both and view them in a colour-managed application or image viewer. If your display is capable of reproducing wide colour gamuts, you should see a noticeable difference between the two. [Edit] OK, that didn't work, the forum software converts to sRGB and ruins the comparison. Here's a Dropbox link to the JPEGs and RAW file where you can download the original files: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/aof74w94f6lm3d2/AABXE2OJMfk__kjA_jb6vwmia?dl=0 Hope that helps! James
  18. Similar to what Walt suggested, I would go right-back to basics to try and isolate where the issue lies from there. Assuming you've already installed the latest version of Affinity Photo (1.7.1.404), try doing the following: 1) Go to [Edit > Preferences > Colour] and set the settings to the same as in the below screenshot: 2) Go to [File > New] and open a new blank document using the same settings as in the below screenshot (pay particular attention to the 'Colour Format' and 'Colour Profile'). In this case the document is using a 'sRGB IEC61966-2.1' document colour profile: 3) Does the red show correctly (red, not orange) in the colour panel, like the following screenshot? 4) Go to [File > New] and open a new blank document using the same settings as in the below screenshot (pay particular attention to the 'Colour Format' and 'Colour Profile'). In this case the document is using a 'ROMM RGB: ISO 22028-2:2013' document colour profile: 5) Does the red show correctly (red, not orange) in the colour panel, like the following screenshot? 6) If in both cases above (I.E. using either a 'sRGB IEC61966-2.1' document colour profile or a 'ROMM RGB: ISO 22028-2:2013' document colour profile) the red is still not showing correctly, then it's possible there could be an issue with your monitor colour profile. In which case, go to [Windows Control Panel > Colour Management > Devices tab]. Make a note of what colour profile is set for 'Display 1'. Also make a note of what colour profile is set for any other displays as well—if you have more than one display (I.E. 'Display 2' in the drop down menu). Then temporarily set the monitor profile for the monitor(s) to use the generic 'sRGB IEC61966-2.1' ICM colour profile as the default profile for your monitor(s). This will use a generic 'sRGB IEC61966-2.1' colour profile instead of your monitor's colour profile. 7) Try from Step 2 again and see if red shows correctly in the colour panel now when using a generic 'sRGB IEC61966-2.1' monitor colour profile instead of your monitor's colour profile. 8) If the colour shows correct when using a generic 'sRGB IEC61966-2.1' monitor colour profile instead of your monitor's colour profile, then that would indicate there's some sort of issue with the monitor colour profile. In which case, you may be able to see if your monitor manufacturer has drivers on their website that contain a different ICM profile that you can try, or maybe see if you still have the discs that came with the monitor and get them from that, however these will possibly be the same as the ones you're already using. If you know someone with a monitor hardware calibrator, you could also try creating a custom monitor profile with that and using that profile in Windows Colour Management.
  19. I came up with this process: Select File:NewBatchJob on the menu. Add the RAW files to the list. Check Save As TIFF with these settings: Pixel Format: RGB 32 bit. Resampler: Bicubic. ICC Profile: ROMM RGB Compression: None. Select Save Into and select or create a directory for the TIFF files. Then use the TIFF files to create the stack. The new images will have the ROMM RGB profile. I'm hoping this will preserve the colour data present in the original RAW file. Is there some way to check whether this is so?
  20. Hi @Murfee, Thanks for moving your posting here. As a matter of fact, when I first began using Affinity Photo, having previously used nothing, not even the ubiquitous products from Adobe, I did everything in 32 bit mode with the ROMM profile, i.e., development and editing. That seemed to be the cause of a curious effect that I can only describe as looking at my work in Affinity Photo and exported JPEGs as if through a veil, or dirty window. The colors were muddy, not clear. For a time I thought I just needed to add a tone curve, and I was satisfied until I began using DxO Photo Lab 2. The colors seemed deeper, clearer. I put the question to one of these forums, whether it is possible to produce something comparable to the output from PL2 with AFP, and one person took a crack at it and produced a .afphoto that compared favorably. I noticed that the output of Develop was 16 bit, and I questioned him about that. Then I reconfigured AFP to produce 16 bit from Develop and never turned back ... until now. I created a 32 bit workflow from a RAW file that I had previously developed, edited and printed in 16 bit using the ROMM profile. The veil phenomenon, which I had never experienced in 16 bit mode, was back, and everything was darker on the display than with the 16 bit file. When I printed the 32 bit workflow, including a curve adjustment to clear up out--of-gamma areas, but excluding the soft proof layer, I saw on the thumbnail in the print dialog that a recolor adjustment that I was using for bringing texture in rock and wood (cf. James Ritson's tutorial https://player.vimeo.com/video/150884324/ from the beginning until about 1:40 min.) was going to be printed much to orangey, even though the orange color was hardly visible on the display. So I had to reduce its saturation the opacity until the thumbnail displayed properly! The resulting printout was OK, but it was much brighter than on the display. In contrast, when I work with 16 bits the printout agrees tolerably well with the display. I've uploaded the files to Google Drive (I think!). Here's a link, I think it allows downloading: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1zkX5qqe1shqc2igAalTTEVzNNefsDwZc?usp=sharing . .NEF is the Nikon RAW file. "36" in the filename denotes the 32 bit workflow, resp. the JPEG export. What display and printer are you using? I have a BenQ SW271 calibrated to Adobe RGB, gamma 2.2, 100 cd/m² and 5800K, and am printing on a Canon Pro-1000 using Canon Photo Paper Plus Glossy II and the printer profile for that paper supplied by Canon.
  21. With the View Tool (the hand) selected, what values do you see in the Context Toolbar for each document's color mode and ICC profile? I suspect that one will show sRGB as my example above does, but the other will have a different ICC profile, possibly Adobe RGB or ROMM RGB.
  22. Hopefully some one can help. I am trying to get a much better all round understanding of 'Colour Profile & Colour Format'. When I open a new RAW Image, I see, along with all the other sliders and adjustments at the bottom is a icon for Profiles ~ When I check this box, it shows ~ Output Profile - sRGB 1EC61966-21 and, if I open up the box, there are a hole host of other profiles with names and numbers (including one, which I have calibrated for my iMac using an i1Studio calibrator). I have seen or read that a much better profile to use is one with a Larger Gamut such as ~ ProPhoto RGB or ROMM RGB. So, at this point am I better to leave it with the sRGB 1EC61966-21 or should I switch the profile to either my latest i1Studio calibrated version? ~ or ~ use as suggested, either the ProPhoto RGB or ROMM RGB.? If I then switch to any of these New / Different profiles, whilst I'm in the Develop Persona, do I have to switch-back-later-on to the sRGB 1EC61966-21 before I print? And, if that's the case… How do I go about this? Normally when I've finished editing an image I go File ⇢New⇢ a 'New Document' dialogue box appears and because I am unsure what to enter in the Colour Format or Colour Profile boxes shy away and just check that the size of paper is correct and click okay. (My bad I know) My prints to date are always slightly disappointing and so perhaps a better understanding of 'Colour Profiles & Colour Formats'. Will help get me to where I should already be. Hopefully someone out there can guide me through this latest post processing maze.
  23. Hopefully some one can help me out…. I am trying to get a much better all round understanding of what 'Colour Profile & Colour Format'. is/are. When I open a New RAW Image, I see, along with all the other adjustments an icon for Profiles ~ When I check this box, it shows ~ Output Profile - sRGB 1EC61966-21 and… if I open up the box, there are a hole host of other profiles with weird names and numbers (including one profile, which I have calibrated for my iMac using an i1Studio calibrator). I have seen or read somewhere that a much better profile to use is one with a Larger Gamut & the ones suggested were ~ ProPhoto RGB or ROMM RGB. So, at this point in the RAW Development process am I better to leave it with the ~ sRGB 1EC61966-21 or, should I switch the profile to either my latest i1Studio calibrated version? ~ or not that then ~ use as suggested a larger Gamut such as ProPhoto RGB or ROMM RGB.? If I then switch to any of these New / Different profiles, whilst I'm in the Develop Persona, do I have to switch-back-later-on to the sRGB 1EC61966-21 before I print? And, if that's the case… How do I go about this? Normally when I've finished editing an image I go File ⇢New⇢ a 'New Document' dialogue box appears and because I am unsure what to enter in the Colour Format or Colour Profile boxes shy away and just check that the size of paper is correct and click okay. (My bad I know) My prints to date are always slightly disappointing and so perhaps a better understanding of 'Colour Profiles & Colour Formats'. Will help get me to where I should already be. Hopefully someone out there can guide me through this latest post processing maze.
  24. @R C-R: Yes, I was sure. Furthermore, how many bits (16 or 32) which color format (8-, 16- or 32-bit RGB, etc.) and which ICC profile (sRGB, Adobe RGB, ROMM RGB) are used during the processing, especially in the Photo persona, seem to be three independently configurable aspects of the processing, an impression that one doesn't automatically get when one learns that the Develop persona works in 32-bit float and uses the ROMM RGB profile. Indeed, I had assumed up until now, that ROMM RGB implied 32-bit processing and 32-bit RGB color format, and that the advantages of both developing and editing using 32-bit floating point calculations in ROMM RGB would outweigh the slowness of floating point calculations. I think I, at least, really need to understand what @James Ritson was warning against when he wrote, "Honestly, I wouldn't recommend touching 32-bit unless ... ." Did he mean color format 32-bit RGB or 32-bit floating point processing, or are these equivalent for him. Specifically, too, I would like to know some of the pitfalls of "32-bit" to which he alludes.
  25. Hi everyone, I'm still very new and am having an issue with photos exported from Affinity Photo. Everything looks great locally, but after uploading to my website the images look much darker. What am I doing incorrectly? My document settings are RGB/8 and ROMM RGB Thanks so much in advance for the help, I really appreciate it.
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