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Peter Green

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  1. I looked at the new icon and thought, "That makes sense." I understand that there is some attraction in having consistency of shape, and this is lost to an extent in the new icon. However, it is a triangle/ A-shaped device, only, this time, overlaid on a corner cropped rectangle. So there is some consistency. On the other hand, the Photo icon centres a representation of a camera iris on the triangle, which is appropriate for a photography program, while the Designer icon emphasises lines and filled shapes to make up the triangle -- again, fitting for a vector program. I took it that the rectangle represented a piece of paper, curled over in the way paper is often iconically represented, with the Affinity A/triangle overlaid on the "page" as text is on a page. Again, the triangle identifies Affinity, and both colour and detail indicate the individual program. I can accept that. EDIT: After writing this, I found the new icons for Photo and Designer on the Publisher task bar, as I came here while the new version was installing. I hope that this doesn't indicate that the new icons are going to spread to the other two programs themselves, though I suppose it does. That doesn't make sense to me! All you would have to go on for quick identification of the program, if that were the case, would be the colour. There should be redundancy in icon information, particularly as we see so many icons!
  2. Great! I tested with one document, and it has worked! Very good -- thanks to everyone involved.
  3. I created an A4 page in landscape mode, with text on both sides, and tried to print to a Canon MG 6300 series inkjet printer. Despite trying several times to make it print double sided, flipping from the left side of the page, it persisted in printing it flipped from the top. As a consequence, the back is inverted relative to the front. As the majority of my files are created to this flipped A4 design, this printing behaviour is a significant drawback to use of Publisher.
  4. I set up a publication in Publisher and copied and pasted the contents of an Indesign publication into it. I was impressed. Not only the text, but also the formatting copied across almost perfectly. Then I used the Publisher document as a template and created a new publication. Good, but not perfect. I think the issue was that Publisher, unlike InDesign, sets up a range of default paragraph styles, and got muddled when it tried to import an InDesign style which had the same name as one of it's own defaults. Tolerable, though a trifle irritating at midnight with a job half done. When I produce a DTP document, I quite often have to transfer the content to a web page (incuding a Facebook Notes page). Normally I just copy and paste. It doesn't work with Publisher. At least, not to an acceptable standard. Any lengthy text entered into Publisher is effectively unusable in any other application. This is a serious limitation.
  5. "Add the value of the gutter next to the number of columns in the toolbar. Ability to divide the p´╗┐age structure into columns." I fully concur! It took me ages, including several attempts at the manual, to find a way to set gutter width, and I am not sure I could repeat the trick. I produce a lot of A5 documents by printing four pages two up on each side of a landscape A4 page. In InDesign, I set up a two column page with 12.7 mm margins and a 25.4 mm gutter, and lay everything else on top of that. 5 minutes to set up, at the most. Doing it any other way involves too much calculating -- time I could use doing something more productive. Then I have to put the guides in by eye -- a potential source of errors. There is no display of the exact position I have dragged the guides to, and no indicator of when each guide is the same distance from the centre. Little details like that make a program so much more usable. I have to add that, so far, I have found the manual unintuitive and difficult to navigate.
  6. Full screen mode for preview for all Affinity programs I agree that Publisher and probably the other two programs could benefit from what Adobe describes as Presentation mode. I am a regular InDesign user, and appreciate the Preview mode, which allows me to pick up errors before printing, and quickly correct them: it is identical to Toggle UI in Publisher. In Adobe's Presentation mode, a full screen uneditable image is displayed. In fact, I prefer using this to using PowerPoint because of the greater degree of layout control available. Using a remote control, I can easily scroll through the pages to illustrate a talk. Also, if I want to produce a graphic incorporating something I have laid out in InDesign, the full screen image provides the best resolution my computer is capable of, so it is easily copied as a screen grab and inserted into the new location.
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