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Renzatic

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  1. Like
    Renzatic reacted to wigglepixel in The History Of Interactive Computer Graphics and Animations   
    Yes!! Part 2 is (finally!) out in the open now!  Hope you like it! There will be a new part in between a month and a few months from now, as soon as possible, but quality content. Already working on it. In the end there will be 6 parts in total. Collect them all !  

    This time with an oldfashioned game inside that fits this period of history! Enjoy!
    English: History Interactive Computer Graphics - Part 2
    Dutch: Geschiedenis Interactieve Computergraphics - Deel 2

    @Alfred @Madame @Roger C @GarryP @Wosven @A_B_C @WatcherMagic @John Rostron @Renzatic @dutchshader
  2. Like
    Renzatic reacted to Andy Marsh in Affinity products for Linux   
    Blender 2.80 and Black Magic DaVinci Resolve and Lightworks brought me to this thread. 
    As part of a Linux workflow it would be a brilliant Unique Selling Point for Affinity to work on a build for Linux. 
    Apple GPU support is fraught with issues. Like Support for NVIDIA cards
    Windows 10 is a good system using NTFS but crashes (and updates) way too much for a modern pro workflow 
    Having at least Affinity Photo available on Linux would compliment the pro video / 3D workflow nicely.
    Personally I would buy a separate licence for Affinity Photo on Linux if it were available
  3. Like
    Renzatic reacted to wigglepixel in The History Of Interactive Computer Graphics and Animations   
    Interested in computers, graphics, animations, games, vr, interactives and internet?
    Computer graphics, animations and interactions are now self-evident. You just have to pick up your smartphone, tablet, desktop computer or what else and you feel intuitively when you have to swipe, click, drag or pinch zoom. You also expect nothing less than nice interfaces with smooth animations. But it wasn't always like this...
    There were times where there were no editors like Photo and Designer, nor Illustrator, nor Photoshop, and even computers and animations of frames didn't exist...
    I wrote a blog series of six where I like to take you on a journey through time with our focus on learning about the development before and during the creation of computers, digital graphics, animations, graphical interfaces, graphics software, interactivity, 3D, a pinch of the first games, the creation of the internet and a touch of virtual reality.
    I have made more than 110 illustrations for this series with Affinity Designer and also provide each part with at least one interactive to bring the events alive as good as possible for you.
    Part 1 is out there now! Hope you like it and I'm sure you learn something new from it and be surprised by some events! There will be a new part every month from now. Enjoy!
    English: History Interactive Computer Graphics - Part 1
    Dutch: Geschiedenis Interactieve Computergraphics - Deel 1

  4. Like
    Renzatic reacted to kpatart in Animations made with After Effects and Affinity Designer   
    Hi guys, 
     
    I wanted to show some work I made using Affinity Designer and After Effects. When I started learning how to animate, it was hard to find info on how to make designs in Affinity Designer and animate them with After Effects.
    After some experimentation, I figured a decent workflow. As you can see, I'm not limited by the lack of integration between the two software suites. If you have any questions, I'd be happy to help.
    Trampolining.mp4 Run.mp4 qDxDyRuLqRegTung.mp4 Robot 3d faux.mp4
  5. Like
    Renzatic reacted to ( ・ิω・ิ) in Affinity products for Linux   
    I doubt anyone of importance will read this but I'd like to chime in and say I use GNU Linux nearly exclusively. I'm not a developer and if anything the install process was easier than windows. I just use it for video editing and "normal" computer usage. I do my photo editing in photoshops webapp and draw vectors in inkscape. I'd drop inkscape and photoshop in an instant for affinity, so just know there is a customer base.
    Also to those that seem to be bashing the idea, it's a good idea for more platforms to be supported. AFAIK no pro image software has tried to sell itself on GNU Linux so it is a tricky thing to compare I get, but I can't really see it being a net loss for the company, compiling wouldn't be too hard because it is afterall the same hardware. I mean if davinci can do it I believe in affinity!
  6. Like
    Renzatic got a reaction from Frozen Death Knight in Affinity products for Linux   
    It should be a consideration, given that Linux's small, specifically inclined userbase is one of the major reasons why Serif doesn't yet consider it worthwhile to port their software. Given that most of the usual Linux crowd doesn't count graphic design as one of their primary concerns (they have GIMP for all their lightweight, just-get-it-done needs), for Serif to flip on their current opinion on the matter, they'd have to see the draw both Linux and the Affinity suite together would have on people.
    Given that there are a goodly number of people sick of Windows 10's forced updates, and occasionally suspect data culling habits, alongside Apple treating the Mac as an aside, something they have to throw a bone to mostly out of obligation, there's reason to look for an alternative, one that Linux could provide. That's something Serif should pay attention to.
  7. Like
    Renzatic got a reaction from SrPx in Affinity products for Linux   
    I'd say Serif's reticence to target Linux is mostly due to that platform being a weak option among their target demographic. They pander mostly to the print, advertisement, web design, and Photography crowds, which are strongest on Macs, have a solid base on Windows, and are almost nonexistent on Linux. The one group that's strong on Linux that the Affinity line might appeal to, the 3D pros and enthusiasts, likely only make up a fractional portion of Serif's entire audience.
    You could say that the major reason why the above mentioned people aren't strong on Linux is due to a lack of a good choice of programs that cater to them there, the chicken and egg argument. It's very possible that Serif releasing the Affinity line could cause a number of people to flock to Linux. I could see how it would appeal to web designers, considering it's a 'nix OS, with all the nice 'nix OS features they know and love, that's built to support coding from the ground up. Being able to do design work there as well would be perfect for them. Straight up digital graphics designers would like it too, since they're usually not all that concerned about the OS, so much as the programs they use. There's a lot of potential for them to make a ton of money on Linux.
    ...but it's all theoretical. It could be a massive success, making them unexpected millions, or it could fall flat on its face, losing them tons of money in an attempt that garners them no extra support. Considering Serif is a pretty small company, already supporting three programs across two platforms, they've probably come to the conclusion that the consequences of failure are just too high for them to take, even for the potential rewards
    It sucks, sure. I'd love to have the Affinity suite on Linux. It'd provide me the perfect excuse to happily abandon Windows were they to do so. But it's obviously not gonna happen anytime soon, so...meh.
  8. Like
    Renzatic got a reaction from SrPx in Affinity products for Linux   
    There's plenty of money to be made in Linux Land, and yes, there are plenty of proprietary programs out there that sell well on the platform.
    It just may not be a good fit for Serif, at least not right now. Like I said before, the Linux demographic is a pretty specific one. One that may not necessarily be interested in the products Serif offers. They could go for broke, release the Affinity suite, and see how things go, but Serif is a pretty small outfit, and the cost they'll sink in porting their software might end up putting the health of the company at risk.
    Think of their current stance less as "we don't think Linux is worth it", and more "it's currently too much of a gamble for us to take at the moment." If they were stating the former, I'd argue against it. There's ton of potential in Linux. The latter? There's not much I can say to counter that. It's not that they don't want to try, it's that they only have so many resources at their disposal, and they'd rather put them towards what they've already got established, rather than stretching themselves too thin. 
  9. Like
    Renzatic got a reaction from msdobrescu in Affinity products for Linux   
    Given that they'd have to require people wanting to opt in on Linux to buy another license to cover the costs of the port, cannibalizing their own user base probably wouldn't be much of a concern there, since it wouldn't equate to a sell lost to allow some of their users to make a lateral move.
     And yes, there are very likely a number of people both in the Linux world, and those waiting for an excuse to jump into Linux who are just looking for an excuse to hand Serif their money. The question is, how large is this demographic? How much money could Serif make off of them? Could they, if they don't make an immediate profit on their hard work, at least get a return on the money sunk porting the software? There are a lot of ifs, ands, and buts surrounding supporting Linux. Tons of maybes, no guarantees.
    Just because a specific business model worked spectacularly for those two companies (or a company and a foundation) doesn't necessarily mean it'll work just as well for Serif. Consider the difference between the three. 
    Red Hat is a company that offers 24/7/365 support to other companies that rely on their software to maintain their internal infrastructure. They're as much a service as they are a software vendor, a very high priced one, and they hire hundreds upon hundreds of people to maintain this service for all their clients. Their use of open source code is something of an aside, considering the product they're really selling isn't their software, they give that away, they're selling their help and reliability.
    That's a business model that just wouldn't work for Serif, who offer software that's self contained, and doesn't need to be maintained by highly trained professionals on a daily basis. They couldn't get away with the prices Red Hat charges.
    And Blender? Next to the Linux kernel itself, it's probably THE darling of the FOSS scene. It's a powerful piece of software that attracts tons of talent, has a head developer/manager who's practically on a first name basis with his entire following (hell, I think I might even have said something to Ton at one point), and enjoys massive amounts of mindshare. Blender is in a pretty unique position, and is reaping the benefits of being there.
    Now Serif is slowly and surely gaining a positive reputation for their work, and they obviously have a number of talented coders in their employ, but using a for-profit, closed sourced model to sell licenses for their software probably means that people won't be quite as generous with their money as they are with the Blender Foundation, and taking donations to support further work outside of their usual revenue stream would probably be filled with tons of legal boondoggles, along with potential hits to their reputation if things don't go 100% according to plan at all times.
  10. Like
    Renzatic got a reaction from Frozen Death Knight in Affinity products for Linux   
    It should be a consideration, given that Linux's small, specifically inclined userbase is one of the major reasons why Serif doesn't yet consider it worthwhile to port their software. Given that most of the usual Linux crowd doesn't count graphic design as one of their primary concerns (they have GIMP for all their lightweight, just-get-it-done needs), for Serif to flip on their current opinion on the matter, they'd have to see the draw both Linux and the Affinity suite together would have on people.
    Given that there are a goodly number of people sick of Windows 10's forced updates, and occasionally suspect data culling habits, alongside Apple treating the Mac as an aside, something they have to throw a bone to mostly out of obligation, there's reason to look for an alternative, one that Linux could provide. That's something Serif should pay attention to.
  11. Like
    Renzatic got a reaction from SrPx in Affinity products for Linux   
    I'd say Serif's reticence to target Linux is mostly due to that platform being a weak option among their target demographic. They pander mostly to the print, advertisement, web design, and Photography crowds, which are strongest on Macs, have a solid base on Windows, and are almost nonexistent on Linux. The one group that's strong on Linux that the Affinity line might appeal to, the 3D pros and enthusiasts, likely only make up a fractional portion of Serif's entire audience.
    You could say that the major reason why the above mentioned people aren't strong on Linux is due to a lack of a good choice of programs that cater to them there, the chicken and egg argument. It's very possible that Serif releasing the Affinity line could cause a number of people to flock to Linux. I could see how it would appeal to web designers, considering it's a 'nix OS, with all the nice 'nix OS features they know and love, that's built to support coding from the ground up. Being able to do design work there as well would be perfect for them. Straight up digital graphics designers would like it too, since they're usually not all that concerned about the OS, so much as the programs they use. There's a lot of potential for them to make a ton of money on Linux.
    ...but it's all theoretical. It could be a massive success, making them unexpected millions, or it could fall flat on its face, losing them tons of money in an attempt that garners them no extra support. Considering Serif is a pretty small company, already supporting three programs across two platforms, they've probably come to the conclusion that the consequences of failure are just too high for them to take, even for the potential rewards
    It sucks, sure. I'd love to have the Affinity suite on Linux. It'd provide me the perfect excuse to happily abandon Windows were they to do so. But it's obviously not gonna happen anytime soon, so...meh.
  12. Like
    Renzatic got a reaction from msdobrescu in Affinity products for Linux   
    Given that they'd have to require people wanting to opt in on Linux to buy another license to cover the costs of the port, cannibalizing their own user base probably wouldn't be much of a concern there, since it wouldn't equate to a sell lost to allow some of their users to make a lateral move.
     And yes, there are very likely a number of people both in the Linux world, and those waiting for an excuse to jump into Linux who are just looking for an excuse to hand Serif their money. The question is, how large is this demographic? How much money could Serif make off of them? Could they, if they don't make an immediate profit on their hard work, at least get a return on the money sunk porting the software? There are a lot of ifs, ands, and buts surrounding supporting Linux. Tons of maybes, no guarantees.
    Just because a specific business model worked spectacularly for those two companies (or a company and a foundation) doesn't necessarily mean it'll work just as well for Serif. Consider the difference between the three. 
    Red Hat is a company that offers 24/7/365 support to other companies that rely on their software to maintain their internal infrastructure. They're as much a service as they are a software vendor, a very high priced one, and they hire hundreds upon hundreds of people to maintain this service for all their clients. Their use of open source code is something of an aside, considering the product they're really selling isn't their software, they give that away, they're selling their help and reliability.
    That's a business model that just wouldn't work for Serif, who offer software that's self contained, and doesn't need to be maintained by highly trained professionals on a daily basis. They couldn't get away with the prices Red Hat charges.
    And Blender? Next to the Linux kernel itself, it's probably THE darling of the FOSS scene. It's a powerful piece of software that attracts tons of talent, has a head developer/manager who's practically on a first name basis with his entire following (hell, I think I might even have said something to Ton at one point), and enjoys massive amounts of mindshare. Blender is in a pretty unique position, and is reaping the benefits of being there.
    Now Serif is slowly and surely gaining a positive reputation for their work, and they obviously have a number of talented coders in their employ, but using a for-profit, closed sourced model to sell licenses for their software probably means that people won't be quite as generous with their money as they are with the Blender Foundation, and taking donations to support further work outside of their usual revenue stream would probably be filled with tons of legal boondoggles, along with potential hits to their reputation if things don't go 100% according to plan at all times.
  13. Like
    Renzatic got a reaction from SrPx in Affinity products for Linux   
    I'd say Serif's reticence to target Linux is mostly due to that platform being a weak option among their target demographic. They pander mostly to the print, advertisement, web design, and Photography crowds, which are strongest on Macs, have a solid base on Windows, and are almost nonexistent on Linux. The one group that's strong on Linux that the Affinity line might appeal to, the 3D pros and enthusiasts, likely only make up a fractional portion of Serif's entire audience.
    You could say that the major reason why the above mentioned people aren't strong on Linux is due to a lack of a good choice of programs that cater to them there, the chicken and egg argument. It's very possible that Serif releasing the Affinity line could cause a number of people to flock to Linux. I could see how it would appeal to web designers, considering it's a 'nix OS, with all the nice 'nix OS features they know and love, that's built to support coding from the ground up. Being able to do design work there as well would be perfect for them. Straight up digital graphics designers would like it too, since they're usually not all that concerned about the OS, so much as the programs they use. There's a lot of potential for them to make a ton of money on Linux.
    ...but it's all theoretical. It could be a massive success, making them unexpected millions, or it could fall flat on its face, losing them tons of money in an attempt that garners them no extra support. Considering Serif is a pretty small company, already supporting three programs across two platforms, they've probably come to the conclusion that the consequences of failure are just too high for them to take, even for the potential rewards
    It sucks, sure. I'd love to have the Affinity suite on Linux. It'd provide me the perfect excuse to happily abandon Windows were they to do so. But it's obviously not gonna happen anytime soon, so...meh.
  14. Like
    Renzatic got a reaction from SrPx in Affinity products for Linux   
    I'd say Serif's reticence to target Linux is mostly due to that platform being a weak option among their target demographic. They pander mostly to the print, advertisement, web design, and Photography crowds, which are strongest on Macs, have a solid base on Windows, and are almost nonexistent on Linux. The one group that's strong on Linux that the Affinity line might appeal to, the 3D pros and enthusiasts, likely only make up a fractional portion of Serif's entire audience.
    You could say that the major reason why the above mentioned people aren't strong on Linux is due to a lack of a good choice of programs that cater to them there, the chicken and egg argument. It's very possible that Serif releasing the Affinity line could cause a number of people to flock to Linux. I could see how it would appeal to web designers, considering it's a 'nix OS, with all the nice 'nix OS features they know and love, that's built to support coding from the ground up. Being able to do design work there as well would be perfect for them. Straight up digital graphics designers would like it too, since they're usually not all that concerned about the OS, so much as the programs they use. There's a lot of potential for them to make a ton of money on Linux.
    ...but it's all theoretical. It could be a massive success, making them unexpected millions, or it could fall flat on its face, losing them tons of money in an attempt that garners them no extra support. Considering Serif is a pretty small company, already supporting three programs across two platforms, they've probably come to the conclusion that the consequences of failure are just too high for them to take, even for the potential rewards
    It sucks, sure. I'd love to have the Affinity suite on Linux. It'd provide me the perfect excuse to happily abandon Windows were they to do so. But it's obviously not gonna happen anytime soon, so...meh.
  15. Like
    Renzatic got a reaction from Old Bruce in Affinity products for Linux   
    To be fair, there's really no such thing as an entirely intuitive, easy to pick up and use 3D editor. If you were to take a stark newbie, set them down in front of Max, Maya, Modo, and Blender, and tell them to make a little house in each one, after everything's said and done, they're going to tell you that the experience was like choosing between four different ways of getting punched in the face. They're all pretty esoteric, and not very friendly.
  16. Like
    Renzatic reacted to SrPx in Affinity products for Linux   
    I do agree.
    But.... more the case of 3D ( Being a 2D/3D grunt,  I always thought (and think) it introduces way more complexity for a graphic worker than 2D), in the full scope all those packages go for, is a very deep world (requires a ton of knowledge and training, no matter the app) , complex, with tons of small and big things to learn and master. So, IMO it's way harder to build an intuitive UI that has to concentrate and organize all that and still be functional for pro work.
    Indeed, often the more you approach to intuitive for newbies, you force a loss in speed for work for pros. And / or have to remove capabilities from the UI to not overwhelm newcomers (I believe Blender 2.8 is after that, setting several levels of complexity in the UI, which the user can toggle on/off, if I recall well (I'm not interested in "simplifying" the UI now, of course). It's an old concept in apps, setting the "pro" or "newbie" UI/config set/etc.)
    The closest things I have seen in doing an easy to learn UI in 3D, have been Cinema 4D (but IMO, very slow as an UI for certain things of everyday work, compared to other UIs) and most definitely, SketchUP (But that one has gone now subscription mode ) . I'm all for UI-less viewports where I handle a lot with keyboard+mouse shortcuts, as it always was faster for me (Blender, Wings 3D, even in certain degree, Photoshop). But that can be extremely intimidating for a newbie. Case in point of  the opposite is Cinema 4D and the old Truespace, where all was an icon with tooltips, and very visual, everything.
    IMO, for any freelancer (full time or not, but specially full time, as wont have an extra salary to help with large sums), it only makes sense now Blender. It covers every field, and you can compensate with other extra utilities where it still lacks a bit.  Of course, if can pay the 250 bucks a month of Autodesk's Max or Maya, then your clients are paying quite well if that overhead cost is non significant to whoever. So, as always, is a game of numbers. I personally dislike subscriptions, so even if I had that kindda clients, I wouldn't go there... (plus, learnt to love Blender).
     
  17. Like
    Renzatic got a reaction from Old Bruce in Affinity products for Linux   
    To be fair, there's really no such thing as an entirely intuitive, easy to pick up and use 3D editor. If you were to take a stark newbie, set them down in front of Max, Maya, Modo, and Blender, and tell them to make a little house in each one, after everything's said and done, they're going to tell you that the experience was like choosing between four different ways of getting punched in the face. They're all pretty esoteric, and not very friendly.
  18. Like
    Renzatic got a reaction from Old Bruce in Affinity products for Linux   
    To be fair, there's really no such thing as an entirely intuitive, easy to pick up and use 3D editor. If you were to take a stark newbie, set them down in front of Max, Maya, Modo, and Blender, and tell them to make a little house in each one, after everything's said and done, they're going to tell you that the experience was like choosing between four different ways of getting punched in the face. They're all pretty esoteric, and not very friendly.
  19. Like
    Renzatic reacted to R C-R in Simple question involving stroke pressure settings in Designer   
    FWIW, you can also double-click (or just click twice -- there is no time-out limit like for a double-click) on either end node of the pressure curve to unlink it. It's actually a toggle of sorts, so if the two nodes are currently linked (as indicated by the tiny little dots in their centers) a single click will unlink them.
    BTW, It took me a lot longer than 5 seconds to figure this out!
  20. Haha
    Renzatic reacted to firstdefence in Simple question involving stroke pressure settings in Designer   
    You broke your world record 
  21. Haha
    Renzatic got a reaction from firstdefence in Simple question involving stroke pressure settings in Designer   
    This seems like something I should be able to find the answer to in 5 seconds flat, but I don't seem able to.
    So, here it is: when I'm playing with the stroke pressure settings, is it possible to set it so that I can move the beginning and ending points on the curve independently of each other?
    ...and then I figure out the answer for myself not even 3 seconds after posting this. Just hit alt when you select your vector.
    Nevermind, yall! Thanks for the help anyway!
  22. Like
    Renzatic reacted to firstdefence in Adobe doubles subscription price   
    Possums waiting... Don't... Open... The... Bag... Muhahahaha!

  23. Like
    Renzatic reacted to carl123 in Adobe doubles subscription price   
    You should find out how they are getting in sooner rather than later and fix it.
    Or one night you're going to wake up to a possum sized axe murderer at the end of your bed
     

  24. Like
    Renzatic reacted to Jeni in Trees,( painting)   
    Hello, 
    I have tryed brushes, blanding modes an effects on paper surfaces. I think it is interesting to work free in Affinity.
    This one it is done in AffinityPhoto.

  25. Thanks
    Renzatic got a reaction from AffinityUser50 in Hand Painted Textures   
    Learning how to do hand painted textures is something I've been wanting to do for a long, long while now. I like the style, I like the look, I think it's quite neat. Thing is, I've always put off trying it out for myself because I know next to nothing about digital painting. I know quite about about manipulating photos to make textures, and a goodly bit about modeling them in a 3D editor, but painted textures are something I figured would always be just out of my reach.
    Then I realized that the only reason why I don't know how to do it is because I've never tried it. That the only thing between me and success is a good bit of practice.
    So here I am. Last Thursday, I decided to do one texture a day for the next month to see how I take to it. I've crammed a few hours of tutorials on Youtube, inspected other people's works, and just studied the hell out of it. Minus some stumbles here and there, I can already see a slight improvement just after a week with it. It started out with my admitted janky first texture, and has come to today, with a grass texture that's actually surprisingly good.
    This thread will act as my diary, detailing my journey from totes noobis, to maybe hopefully pretty decent. If anyone wants to add or critique what I've done, feel more than free. I'm always up for some tips, tricks, and a bit of harsh, but honest criticism. 
    (FYI, these images are scaled down from their original size)
    Day 1. My first attempt. It is, like I said, kinda janky. To my credit, at least you can tell what it is.

    Day 2. Another stone floor. Probably the one texture I spent the longest time with. Trying to get the shading just right.

    Day 3. A wood floor. This one was, eh...okay. It's a little flat and plain, kinda rough, but hey. Just my third day.

    Day 4. Wooden roof shingles. This is where I felt like I was starting to get a slight feel for things. It's still pretty sloppy, and you can see a few areas where I guffed up, but it's not bad.

    Day 5. Stone tiles. My least favorite of the bunch, and the one I spent the least amount of effort on, truth be told. I tried to do something in a celshaded style. Ended up just looking bland.

    Day 6. My 2nd attempt at a wood floor. It's certainly better than my first, with some actual texture and depth to it.

    Day 7. Grass. Dunno if I'm improving, or if the stars happened to align just right on this one. It's the first texture I've done that I'd consider actually decent. Though if you look at it closely, you can see how I cheated things a bit.

    And there you have it. My work so far. From here on out, I'll be posting one a day. Like I said, if anyone here wants to throw in their 2 cents, you're more than welcome.
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