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Hello,

 

A rather strange thing's happening when opening raw files with affinity!

I have a Canon 60D, a canon 200D and a Nikon D850. I shoot mainly raw and am used to make some minor editing of my photos. Most of the times I'm already satisfied with the "in camera" result and just make some minor adjustments later on in my computer. So, I use the camera profiles to adjust parameters (like contrast, saturation, ecc) and then export the raw (or nef) files to my computer. When opening (with affinity) the files from my 60D, there are no differences between the osx preview software and the image I see in Affinity; meaning that Affinity can, at least to a certain degree, read the profiles and adjustments the user makes in a canon 60D. But when I open my files from the canon 200D or from the Nikon D850, the raw files are simply flat, with no customization what so ever (in the preview software they look just like in the camera or if they were jpegs)! 

You'll probably answer me by explaining that a raw file is "raw", etc, anf I know that, but it's very useful to have a software that can read the changes you make "in camera", otherwise you're throwing a big and beautiful part of your work in the bin.

 

What can I do to solve this problem?

Am I doing something wrong?

 

Thank you in advance for your attention,

Simão

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The Nikon D850 RAW format is supported by the Apple RAW engine (on their latest MacOS), but only the Nikons RAW L-Format here. So if you change prefs settings in APhoto on MacOS to use the Apple engine instead of APhotos own it should normally work. - Other than that to get out more precise support for Nikon specific cam settings like D-Lighting and Picture Control etc. use Nikon's own NX-D raw converter.

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5 hours ago, v_kyr said:

The Nikon D850 RAW format is supported by the Apple RAW engine (on their latest MacOS), but only the Nikons RAW L-Format here. So if you change prefs settings in APhoto on MacOS to use the Apple engine instead of APhotos own it should normally work. - Other than that to get out more precise support for Nikon specific cam settings like D-Lighting and Picture Control etc. use Nikon's own NX-D raw converter.

Thank you!

But how can I do that, I have no idea...

 

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10 hours ago, firstdefence said:

What version of OS X are you using and what version of Affinity Photo (APh) are you using?

 

The D850 isn't in the supported RAW Camera's list Here nor is the Canon 200D.

 

This is the Lens Support page: Lens Support

OSX: High Sierra 10.13.3

Affinity: 1.6.7

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Hi SimãoVP,

Welcome to Affinity Forums :)

To change the RAW engine used by Affinity Photo, go to menu View ▸ Assistant Manager... (in Photo Persona), click the Develop Assistant... button on the bottom left to switch to the Develop Assistant then change the first dropdown RAW Engine to Apple (Core Image RAW). Next time you open a RAW file it will use the Apple engine.

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11 minutes ago, MEB said:

Hi SimãoVP,

Welcome to Affinity Forums :)

To change the RAW engine used by Affinity Photo, go to menu View ▸ Assistant Manager... (in Photo Persona), click the Develop Assistant... button on the bottom left to switch to the Develop Assistant then change the first dropdown RAW Engine to Apple (Core Image RAW). Next time you open a RAW file it will use the Apple engine.

It's not working :(

 

 

Captura de ecrã 2018-03-26, às 19.00.39.png

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17 minutes ago, SimãoVP said:

It's not working

What do you mean with it's not working? The RAW image is there, though you would have to tweak it's settings (exposer, contrast, sharpening etc.) in order to look like the Nikon NX-D processed one. - As I said above, other RAW processing software doesn't know and have clues about Nikon's own cam specific settings, thus they seldom do show it up the same way without altering settings. Only Nikon's own software knows how to deal with their special cam settings and thus their software applies those makernote specific things.

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11 minutes ago, SimãoVP said:

There it is... Isnt it right?

Yes now the Apple APh RAW engine processes the image. You can try "tone curve" and "exposer bias" to see if those apply something which then comes closer to the Nikon NX-D processed one. Or you finetune with the APh RAW option panel settings and then try to make some reusable APh preset for your shots.

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Thank you!

 

As far as I can understand, it is impossible to access my D850's settings with Affinity, is that right? The only thong I can do is trying to get "closer" to the picture I originally created "in camera". Is that right?

 

So, I have two questions:

1- Is this possible with other cameras listed as "Affinity compatible"? If so, will it ever be possible with D850's raw files?

2- Will I be losing much by editing from jpegs (I take pictures in raw, but with a jpeg copy)?

 

Thanks!

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1 hour ago, SimãoVP said:

As far as I can understand, it is impossible to access my D850's settings with Affinity, is that right? The only thong I can do is trying to get "closer" to the picture I originally created "in camera". Is that right?

Well at least not all Nikon specific ones, common cam settings like normal exposer, WB, lens focal length etc. are usually accessable through the Exif data of a RAW image. Other RAW converters like let's say LR, C2 or DxO ... do read and interpret those settings too and do come close. But those very Nikon specific like D-Lighting and own Picture Control setups for example are things these other converters normally don't know how to deal with. So for the later it's more difficult for third party software to get out how to right balance those.

The Apple RAW engine supported by APh for Macs does a more or less good job for applying normal Nikon cam settings here, meaning those Exif informations which are the overall common denominator as with others vendor cams settings here (the default Exif standard without very vendor specific features as makernote data).

So if you use very Nikon specific features like D-Lighting and custom Picture Control settings etc. in your D850 then other third party software (RAW converters) mostly don't know how to make any use out of this. Nikon View NX-I and Capture NX-D instead know how to deal with these.

  1. Can't tell for other camera brands, since I mostly shoot only with Nikons and sometimes (but rather rare) some Canon too here. - But other people who use other cam brands might can tell you instead.
  2. It depends how good your cam setup is and of what quality your JPG results are then. Some Pro photographers I know do shoot in their studio mostly JPGs, since they optimized their whole workflow and setups/settings (cam, studio lighting, software etc.) accordingly over time. - Since you shoot both RAW + JPG you can and have to try out for yourself here and compare critical your results.

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