Jump to content
You must now use your email address to sign in [click for more info] ×

Rules for broken curves


Recommended Posts

To save me hours of experimentation and brain cell abuse, does anybody know which part of a "broken" curve will be on top?

 

If I take a curve and break the shape, which node (or segment) will be on top. I foolishly assumed that it would have something to do with the start point, but in the two shapes below, I drew from opposite ends and clicked on the "break curve" button, but the right hand path node over the break, was the one on top.

 

It is actually quite important (?) because if you break a path, knowing which part of the line that is about to move saves a move, an undo, a selection change and another move.

 

I know clicking on the segment changes things but that doesn't help on a circle. 

 

I know I can drag the node tool over both nodes and shift click to get the bottom one but I would like a little clarity.

line.png

Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Would that not show in the layers panel?

 

Not with a circle 

Edited by dutchshader
forgot to think

intel core i5,  16GB 128Gb ssd win10 Pro Huion new 1060plus.

philips 272p 2560x1440px on intel HD2500 onboard graphics

Razer Tartarus Chroma

Link to comment
Share on other sites

From what I can tell, at least for open shapes it does depend on the start & end nodes -- the node nearest the original red end node is the top one.

All 3 1.10.8, & all 3 V2.5.0 Mac apps; 2020 iMac 27"; 3.8GHz i7, Radeon Pro 5700, 32GB RAM; macOS 10.15.7
Affinity Photo 
1.10.8; Affinity Designer 1.108; & all 3 V2 apps for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iPadOS 15.7

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When a curve is drawn, the last point is shown by a red node. I guess it could be said to be at the "top" of the node list. Any node added to the curve, or already existing is below that. When one of those lower nodes is broken, it is still "below" the original top. The section moves up in the layer list. What is left of the original curve now has a "top" red node hidden under the bottom node of the new upper layer.

 

In a closed curve, a break point is promoted to the top. A second break defines the portion of a new layer, an unclosed curve. The remnant of the original is below. Try decomposing a polygon by sequentially breaking faces away. You will see the original figure shown in the layers panel to be whittled away.

iMac 27" Retina, c. 2015: OS X 10.11.5: 3.3 GHz I c-5: 32 Gb,  AMD Radeon R9 M290 2048 Mb

iPad 12.9" Retina, iOS 10, 512 Gb, Apple pencil

Huion WH1409 tablet

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, gdenby said:

In a closed curve, a break point is promoted to the top.

I think part of what @toltec is asking is which node ends up on top. This seems to depend on the direction of the curve; or equivalently, which node becomes the end one after it is broken. Shapes like ellipses, rectangles, etc. apparently have a predetermined direction when broken, but it can be reversed prior to breaking it using the "Reverse Curves" action:

reversed.png.0df8acb060558f9f7050c51232b9b12f.png

For nodes with an extended control handle like above, it is fairly obvious which node is selected, but this would not be true if the nodes at & adjacent to the break point were sharp ones with no extended handles.

All 3 1.10.8, & all 3 V2.5.0 Mac apps; 2020 iMac 27"; 3.8GHz i7, Radeon Pro 5700, 32GB RAM; macOS 10.15.7
Affinity Photo 
1.10.8; Affinity Designer 1.108; & all 3 V2 apps for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iPadOS 15.7

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, R C-R said:

From what I can tell, at least for open shapes it does depend on the start & end nodes -- the node nearest the original red end node is the top one.

 

Yes, thanks guys. That has sorted it for me.  :)

 

As gdenby says, the later ones are "on top" and as R C-R suggested, reversing the path sorts the circle selection.

 

 

 

 

Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Guidelines | We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.