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I have the same  problem. Sometimes the whole system seems to be affected. 
Sometimes I get an error message (see below). 

It is not only annoying but I can't work any more as well. 

The only program running is Publisher and I've got around 1 TB of free disk space.
Only one document is open with 236 pages.

Bildschirmfoto 2021-02-27 um 18.35.44.png

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This is TERRIBLE. Updating to 1.9.1 has made Publisher crash on my new M1 Macbook Air (Big Sur 11.2) whenever I try to open a file I started on another computer. Now, when I reinstall 1.8.6, it tells me it can't open the file because it contains elements from a newer version. ARGHHH! I am on deadline.  I am sorry, I love Affinity, but I have to say that this is UNACCEPTABLE. If there is one thing a page layout program MUST NOT DO is crash when opening current files. These page layout programs contain so much work and are so deadline-oriented, that the program must be like the Hoover Dam — rock solid and dependable.

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@whitewolf7070 @Martin Diestelmann @Gaunilo

Hopefully this is taken as friendly advice: got caught out after the 1.9.0 release, but only briefly, as I had backups. You always have to be prepared to do so, even with Adobe. I’ve got about three layers of backup in place. If you’re under client deadline scenarios, have at least one backup. Get that document, at least once a day, and duplicate and date stamp it. Then work on it. If a new version of software is released, put the version in the file name, so you can troubleshoot. You have to protect yourself from screw ups. The only later times in my career I’ve been caught out, are in instances where I’m working on contract, offsite, and an over-zealous studio “manager” deleted my files from the company server, as I was working on them, with an internal client sat next to me. From that day on, I learned another lesson: trust no-one but yourself. I worked locally, and then uploaded the finished files to the server, once work was complete for the day.

Adobe screwed up like this many years ago, when they moved to Creative Suite. All sorts of craziness with incompatible files across versions. At least they introduced IDML for InDesign, eventually. That was sometimes a life saver. Regardless, you’ve got to cover your own back. Then you can relax, and get on with trying to enjoy your chosen career, without added unnecessary stress. If you’re on macOS, you should at least have time machine to roll back a version of your document? Maybe, an iCloud backup for active projects only? I got caught by the 1.9.0 update, but only lost a couple of hours work. Hope this helps. I’m experienced, but still get caught out from time to time. Cover your back for these annoying situations. They will happen, no matter the company behind the software, or hardware. Your clients will love you for it. They still won’t like the colour of something; the photo you chose for the double spread; or your insistence on using italics or obliques for emphasis in the copy of an article, but they won’t understand why you can’t carry on working, because you didn’t back yourself up, after a software release.

I’m not enjoying the silence from Affinity, and they never acknowledged my first bug report of my same issue for 1.9.0, until after the 1.9.1 release. But hey, s##t happens. Look after yourselves; no-one else will. 👍

iMac Pro (2017) Processor: 3GHz 10-Core Intel Xeon W / Memory: 64 GB 2666 MHz DDR4 / Graphics: Radeon Pro Vega 64 16 GB | iPad Pro: 12.9 inch 2nd Gen

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1 hour ago, deeland said:

@whitewolf7070 @Martin Diestelmann @Gaunilo

Hopefully this is taken as friendly advice: got caught out after the 1.9.0 release, but only briefly, as I had backups. You always have to be prepared to do so, even with Adobe. I’ve got about three layers of backup in place. If you’re under client deadline scenarios, have at least one backup. Get that document, at least once a day, and duplicate and date stamp it. Then work on it. If a new version of software is released, put the version in the file name, so you can troubleshoot. You have to protect yourself from screw ups. The only later times in my career I’ve been caught out, are in instances where I’m working on contract, offsite, and an over-zealous studio “manager” deleted my files from the company server, as I was working on them, with an internal client sat next to me. From that day on, I learned another lesson: trust no-one but yourself. I worked locally, and then uploaded the finished files to the server, once work was complete for the day.

Adobe screwed up like this many years ago, when they moved to Creative Suite. All sorts of craziness with incompatible files across versions. At least they introduced IDML for InDesign, eventually. That was sometimes a life saver. Regardless, you’ve got to cover your own back. Then you can relax, and get on with trying to enjoy your chosen career, without added unnecessary stress. If you’re on macOS, you should at least have time machine to roll back a version of your document? Maybe, an iCloud backup for active projects only? I got caught by the 1.9.0 update, but only lost a couple of hours work. Hope this helps. I’m experienced, but still get caught out from time to time. Cover your back for these annoying situations. They will happen, no matter the company behind the software, or hardware. Your clients will love you for it. They still won’t like the colour of something; the photo you chose for the double spread; or your insistence on using italics or obliques for emphasis in the copy of an article, but they won’t understand why you can’t carry on working, because you didn’t back yourself up, after a software release.

I’m not enjoying the silence from Affinity, and they never acknowledged my first bug report of my same issue for 1.9.0, until after the 1.9.1 release. But hey, s##t happens. Look after yourselves; no-one else will. 👍

Thank you. I appreciate the advice. Thankfully I have the file open and working on a slightly older Intel-based iMac. I recently purchased a loaded M1 — waiting for months for it to arrive — to be able to work on projects outside the office, but when I tried to open the project the last few days, boom. Publisher just snaps shut. I am sure I have generated many, many crash reports to Apple 🙂. Anyway, what can you do?

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  • 1 month later...

Crash, crash, crash. Updated to 1.9.2 on Intel 2017 iMac and 2020 M1 MacBook Air. If I open a publication on the Air and Save As, then try to open it on the iMac (via Dropbox), the iMac version crashes. Vice versa. I have sent the file with small changes back and forth many times. 

However, SOMETIMES, the files will open on the other platform! Other times, AP just snaps shut. There is no discernible pattern. If I try to load two AP files on the iMac, a small one and the larger main publication, AP crashes. It is simply not stable. 

For a while, I thought Adobe fonts were causing the problem. I had CC open on one platform, but not the other. So, I made sure it was open on both. For the next couple of times, the file opened on both platforms. Then, AP started crashing again whenever I tried to open a file saved on the Air to the iMac. 

We purchased the Air (fully loaded), and waited for months for it to arrive, to be able to do layout work outside the office. However, this is not useable. This program is not stable enough for production work when attempting to edit the same file between Intel and ARM Macs.  That's my experience even with 1.9.2. 

The image below is my constant companion now. 

Screen Shot 2021-04-02 at 4.32.40 PM.png

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@whitewolf7070 

44 minutes ago, whitewolf7070 said:

For a while, I thought Adobe fonts were causing the problem. I had CC open on one platform, but not the other. So, I made sure it was open on both. For the next couple of times, the file opened on both platforms. Then, AP started crashing again whenever I tried to open a file saved on the Air to the iMac.

That’s interesting. That would raise my suspicions, yes? Adobe CC delivers typefaces (and fonts (further down to all glyphs)) as part of CC being open and active, and connected to the internet. That’s as I remember when I used it last, as I now only use it when a client is willing to pay for the extra overhead. So, with that in mind, does turning off (you've tried on, already) Adobe CC services on all machines (via its own control panel, if memory serves?), effectively disabling all CC fonts. This may very well mean your Publisher document now has no access to the Adobe CC fonts, but does it now crash? Report missing fonts? Worth a test, in my opinion. Further, build a document with fonts installed on your individual computer, if possible, and see if the crashing continues? With all that considered, it would not surprise me to find Adobe CC snookering a user in to having difficulties using third party software, and and Adobe CC typefaces. Food for thought?

iMac Pro (2017) Processor: 3GHz 10-Core Intel Xeon W / Memory: 64 GB 2666 MHz DDR4 / Graphics: Radeon Pro Vega 64 16 GB | iPad Pro: 12.9 inch 2nd Gen

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