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Some language-independent glyphs for museum shops


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Here is a link to a font produced today using artwork from 2014 and 2016.

I wonder how the glyphs can be applied today using Affinity products.

https://forum.high-logic.com/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=4930

It is a colour font with monochrome graceful fallback glyphs included.

William

 

Until December 2022, using a Lenovo laptop running Windows 10 in England. From January 2023, using an HP laptop running Windows 11 in England.

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So, yes, Affinity products do not do colour fonts at present, but I would like to get a hardcopy print of my designs to frame.

There is a thread about producing such artwork.

https://forum.affinity.serif.com/index.php?/topic/138654-artwork-for-greetings-cards/

So, it's the workaround.

https://forum.affinity.serif.com/index.php?/topic/128285-colour-fonts-and-affinity-products

Yet up until now the workaround has only, as far as I know, been used to get a picture of a colour font, just more or less luck as to what one got as regards size.

Can the technique be applied with some precision, specifically so that I get produce artwork for a greetings card so that i can get a quality print to frame?

I am currently thinking of use Affinity Designer to produce an SVG file with text not converted to curves, display the SVG file in a colour-enabled browser, such as Microsoft Edge, make an image file (possibly a png, but we can experiment as to what is available) and then import the image file into Affinity Designer, then continue and eventually produce a 300 dots per inch jpg file for printing.

Yes, something can be produced, but can the technique be refined to get precision or even a bit more precision than at present?

Thus the quest begins!

William

 

Until December 2022, using a Lenovo laptop running Windows 10 in England. From January 2023, using an HP laptop running Windows 11 in England.

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Here is an SVG file of the above, together with a png produced in Paint from a Print Screen image of the SVG file displayed in Microsoft Edge.

Well, it was just done that way so as to get the colours into this thread, but clearly I need to get an improvement before using the png to produce some colour artwork that is anything even approaching quality.

Yet this is a workshop thread, so here we are.

Please note that with the monochrome illustration in the previous post, I chose the colour in Affinity Designer. For the colour illustration the colours are those that I chose in 2014 when I produced the first version of the font, those colours being built into the font.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

museum_001_first_colour_attempt.png.c9431403fe8b739c269205e512cb92be.png

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

William

 

museums_001.svg

Until December 2022, using a Lenovo laptop running Windows 10 in England. From January 2023, using an HP laptop running Windows 11 in England.

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I tried just one glyph at 144 point. Previously I was using 36 point.

Here is the SVG and a png from a Print Screen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

museum001_144point.png.187b8e90b38d86c7b2cde6a9664c48b9.png

 

 

 

 

 

 

When placed in Affinity Designer, the image was a bit smaller than the 144 point monochrome glyph, but not vastly so, so it is usable.

I need to try to find a way to get a precise calibration.

So it looks like I need to make ten individual svg files, and find a reproducible way to get the png files so that they are all the same size, and so that I can use them with text much as if I were using a colour font.

William

 

 

 

 

museums_001_144point.svg

Until December 2022, using a Lenovo laptop running Windows 10 in England. From January 2023, using an HP laptop running Windows 11 in England.

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1 hour ago, William Overington said:

Did you mean to point to a workaround post or thread, William? You’ve provided a top-level link to the (desktop) Questions forum.

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14 minutes ago, Alfred said:

Did you mean to point to a workaround post or thread, William? You’ve provided a top-level link to the (desktop) Questions forum.

To the workaround thread.

I will try to fix it.

William

 

Until December 2022, using a Lenovo laptop running Windows 10 in England. From January 2023, using an HP laptop running Windows 11 in England.

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8 minutes ago, William Overington said:

Here is an experimental use.

Setting aside the fact that there is commonly no space between multiple initials (i.e. ‘E. P.’ tends to be presented as ‘E.P.’) there seems to be a missed opportunity here. I would have called her ‘Ms Anne Onymous’.

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31 minutes ago, Alfred said:

Setting aside the fact that there is commonly no space between multiple initials (i.e. ‘E. P.’ tends to be presented as ‘E.P.’) ...

Sometimes the practice is that there are no dots, but the initials have a space between them.

31 minutes ago, Alfred said:

... there seems to be a missed opportunity here. I would have called her ‘Ms Anne Onymous’.

Well, the font is available in the linked High-Logic thread, and you have Affinity Designer.

Please remember that there is a language-independent glyph for Full name, and so perhaps Ms Onymous needs more than one given name.

I mean, Ms Example has three given names. 😀

Also, Ms Example has a postal address. I have yet to devise a postcode. I know that there is an unused dial code available for putting a telephone number on a sign in a movie. The British version is not obvious, but characters in American movies using 555 gets a bit obvious! I wonder if there is a British dummy postcode for use in movies and novels.

William

Until December 2022, using a Lenovo laptop running Windows 10 in England. From January 2023, using an HP laptop running Windows 11 in England.

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2 hours ago, William Overington said:

I know that there is an unused dial code available for putting a telephone number on a sign in a movie.

I knew about the US one but not the UK one, although I’ve found the latter now.

2 hours ago, William Overington said:

I wonder if there is a British dummy postcode for use in movies and novels.

If there is, I haven’t heard of it and have failed to find such a thing via a quick search.

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41 minutes ago, William Overington said:

I found this for telephone numbers.

This is the page I found earlier:

https://www.ofcom.org.uk/phones-telecoms-and-internet/information-for-industry/numbering/numbers-for-drama

As for postcodes, the fictional postcode RE1 3DW is mentioned in item 16 on the following page:

https://www.postcodes4u.co.uk/funs-facts-about-postcodes

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No criticism of the OP or anyone on this thread but . . . using "glyphs" instead of words just seems like one more step towards a society where reading and writing are discouraged.

Only 63 years old, but I have certainly seen a departure from literacy.

"The one witch broke" . . . Which witch is he talking about? Is she out of money or not functional?

"Grab the book over their" . . . Over their what?

"Were are you" . . . I was at home. I've been to most of the 50 states. What time period are you talking about?

Knowledge is power, and I have no problems with adding to either my vocabulary or knowledge. On the other hand, the powers that be also know that knowledge is power.

Things were so much easier in the dark ages. People were easier to control because they didn't know any better.

Illiteracy was a boon to oppressors the world over for centuries, and so it continues today. Fake news? Why not just call it a lie if it isn't true?

Afraid you might offend someone by calling them a liar? Well, if they can't handle being offended, they shouldn't lie.

We as a society are already failing at communicating using words. Can you imagine the chaos if we went to glyphs for communication?

Sorry, society's enthusiasm over this just escapes my understanding.

 

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Thank you for posting.

Generally I agree that correct grammar and correct spelling are mportant.

However, so is communication.

Suppose a man works somewhere where he is not close to a telephone.

One day, the company telephonist receives a telephone call from the man's wife: she wants him to telephone her urgently.

The telephonist writes a message on a piece of paper and asks an office colleague to take the note to the man.

The man receives the note.

The note has the following message.

Your wife rang. She asks you to telephone her urgently.

However, the telephonist has spelled the word wrongly as 'too'.

Does the man telephone his wife or does he regard the message as unintelligible?

Which is more important, the spelling or the communication?

What if the message had been

RING WIFE NOW

Does the man get indignant over the message being in all capitals - taken as the telephonist shouting at him and ordering him about, or does he telephone his wife, concerned for her?

Suppose that this is in England, but he does not understand English very well. He met the English lady to whom he is now married when she, a teacher of German, was in Germany and the language of their home is German, and he is trying to learn English but is not very good at it yet. If there were a glyph, an abstract design, easily drawn, widely known, that means 'Please telephone your home urgently.' in any and all languages, and the telephonist had drawn that glyph, or used a rubber stamp, would that be good?

What if the practice were to write the message in English and use the glyph too? Would that be better?

Some years ago Google street view introduced interior views of various art galleries. At the presentation of MoMA, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, there was a move-around-in presentation of the foyer. I saw a notice on a stand. I zoomed in on it. It had sentences in various languages, about six languages. In English, there was 'Thank you for visiting'. There was French, Spanish, German and maybe two or three others, one might have been Japanese. Yet there are many more than that number of languages in the world.

So a glyph to mean 'Thank you for visiting' in any and all languages would, in my opinion, be useful.

This glyph is featured in my first novel.

http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~ngo/localizable_sentences_the_novel_chapter_072.pdf on page 3.

http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~ngo/localizable_sentences_the_novel_chapter_079.pdf on page 8

Please note though that later research now suggests a glyph for each localizable sentence.

So a notice could be designed in Affinity Designer using several languages and also that glyph.

Where should the glyph be placed? At the top? At the bottom? Second to the first language, the first language being the language of the country where the museum is located?

What about including Polish as well as the usual languages that appear on such notices?

Some readers might find the notices described in the following novel chapter of interest.

http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~ngo/localizable_sentences_the_second_novel_chapter_024.pdf

William

 

 

Until December 2022, using a Lenovo laptop running Windows 10 in England. From January 2023, using an HP laptop running Windows 11 in England.

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If anyone wants to try using the glyph for

Thank you for visiting

it is at U+E922 in the following font.

https://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~ngo/LOCSE977.TTF

The glyph for

Welcome

is at U+E921 in the same font.

Both glyphs are in the Private Use Area of the font.

William

 

Until December 2022, using a Lenovo laptop running Windows 10 in England. From January 2023, using an HP laptop running Windows 11 in England.

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16 hours ago, Smee Again said:

No criticism of the OP or anyone on this thread but . . . using "glyphs" instead of words just seems like one more step towards a society where reading and writing are discouraged.

Here is a link to a webspace that someone in France told me about.

http://www.tralelho.fr/

That webspace is to solve a practical problem that arose at a hospital in Rennes, France.

It goes from French to another language.

If each sentence had a code number and a glyph, it could go from one language to another language via the code number or the glyph.

Then each national standards committee could publish a list of code numbers and glyphs and the meaning expressed in the language or languages of that country and people visiting another country could have the list in their own language on a card or a booklet (maybe a Z-card in their wallet or purse).

https://www.zcard.co.uk/

Entering the code number and the target language code into a suitably programmed system could result in the playing of a prerecorded audio file for that particular sentence.

William

 

Until December 2022, using a Lenovo laptop running Windows 10 in England. From January 2023, using an HP laptop running Windows 11 in England.

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I have made an improved version, so that the field for the 'name as on card' is wider than the name being used in the example.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

museums_005.png.55e2fc845e026268db8802b79b414f50.png

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

William

 

Until December 2022, using a Lenovo laptop running Windows 10 in England. From January 2023, using an HP laptop running Windows 11 in England.

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On 6/18/2021 at 12:09 PM, William Overington said:

If each sentence had a code number and a glyph, it could go from one language to another language via the code number or the glyph.

The glyph is a pictorial encoding of the code number. The code number itself doesn’t need to be exposed to the end user.

Google Translate

Bing Microsoft Translator

DeepL Translate

Yandex Translate

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22 minutes ago, Alfred said:

The glyph is a pictorial encoding of the code number. The code number itself doesn’t need to be exposed to the end user.

That depends. Code numbers have the advantage of being listable in numerical order. Glyphs do not have that advantage.

However, glyphs can be more recognisable than code numbers.

Code numbers could be useful for printing in a Z-card or on a piece of card.

There could be a code numbers and English version, a code numbers and French version, a code number and Japanese version, and so on.

So I use both glyphs and code numbers, in matched pairs.

Thank you for the links.

William

 

Until December 2022, using a Lenovo laptop running Windows 10 in England. From January 2023, using an HP laptop running Windows 11 in England.

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42 minutes ago, William Overington said:

Code numbers have the advantage of being listable in numerical order. Glyphs do not have that advantage.

If the numerical values are helpful for grouping related codes, you can use those values for ordering the corresponding glyphs without actually displaying the code numbers themselves.

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