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Found 9 results

  1. Guys. Linux is the future. You may not see it at the moment, but you are trusting Apple way too much. What if your golden ecosystem breaks down? The thing is that I know lots of people who would be willing to purchase this software for even more than the original price if it was available for Linux. The Linux community is not cheap. If there is a quality product that is worth it, we're gonna buy it. And I'm pretty convinced Affinity is. When I read about it, I was super excited because as a young alternative to Illustrator, Sketch and Vectormator, there would be a chance of Affinity being more modern and also supporting other Unices than only Mac OS. See, the world of Unix is so unbelievably huge, yet you are concentrating on such a tiny subset of it. The programming effort is tiny, many Unix programs are portable between systems without any modifications. Since Mac OS is practically a BSD-Rip-off, the programming effort of porting Affinity to Linux is tinytinytiny And you could be one of the first innovative companies offering a consumer-application for Linux, which would probably not only make huge waves in the Linux community itself, but also the whole industry, which will also gain you lots and lots of customers. Unless you were dumb enough to use native Apple-APIs of course. Then you're f****d. In that case I would advise switching as soon as possible, as painful as it might be. It will save you lots and lots of problems and lots of future pain. I can only advise you to look into Qt, which is by the way also cross-platform-compatible. Yes, I'm even talking about Windows.
  2. Has anyone successfully ran Affinity photo or designer in Linux (Wine)? Thanks Bob
  3. Hi there! I am wondering if Linux support is coming sometime.
  4. Hi! Since I am moving from Apple to Korora (Fedora Spin), was wondering if Serif is going to make GNU/Linux Affinity Designer and Photo? There is huge gap in photo/image editing and vector apps on linux (I am aware of GIMP and Inkscape, however they are not pro apps). My main scanning/3D/photo editing has moved to Korora workstation (VueScan, Blender, Darktable), I am thinking of completely dumping Apple for Linux. Best regards, P.
  5. Hi all, I would like to give my opinion on how I see the market. So considering Adobe does not have interest in the Linux market, you guys could at least take the opportunity and make a version of Affinity Photo for Linux, which would be a really nice alternative to Photoshop. I've tested and looked at a few Photoshop for Linux (mainly open source ones), but unfortunately none of them really stand that well. I've been using Photoshop since 2007 while I was in college, and I still use it at work, so it is really challenge to find out one to use at home that functionality wise, shortcuts, and everything fits to my pace. Best regards, Antonio Neto.
  6. Hello There I have some suggestions/requests from Serif, maybe with these you might have a chance to change the game: A version for Linux, don't underestimate that realm and the amount of popularity you will gain from the Linux community, even if it's relatively small (for now) Maybe a full usable free of charge for individuals (for the three popular operating systems Windows, Mac OS, and Ubuntu/LinuxMint) and a paid support (enterprise maybe)? You can follow WPS Office and FoxitPDF examples An Affinity Desktop Publisher that is an alternative to Adobe InDesign and Quark What do you guys think? Looking forward to hear your thoughts
  7. Existence of Windows version of Affinity programs makes running them on Linux theoretically possible. While installers refuse to work under both Wine and Mono, it's no big deal as it's possible to just copy the installation from another PC or virtual machine with Windows. However, after copying files the problem is usage of .NET and WPF while being 64 bit applications. Both Wine and Mono behave as if .NET is not installed. Support for 64-bit .NET on Wine and Mono is almost non-existent, however 32bit apps usually work. Therefore, 32bit build would be super useful, as it may mean finally getting professional graphic editor on Linux (of course there will be a lot of "fun" getting DX10 to work so nothing is warranted). By the way, the only thing that made Designer go over 2GB of RAM usage was .psd exporting.
  8. Hi Guys, congratulation for the awesome work. Your product is for sure a game changer in the market now. Since affinity have the Version for mac and windows (and now ipad on the way), i ask. Do you have future plans to make versions for linux and chrome OS. I think with these 2 systems included, the name of Serif and Serif products will blow up. I wish you the best, and keep the good work.
  9. First off, its great to see another contender in the ring against Adobe. Microsoft tried and failed with there Expression Studio software, but then again its not the first mistake they have ever made. You guys have some solid programs and your Affinity Project looks great, but why just Mac? Hear(read) me out, I have a big love for the Linux Community. Ubuntu is the distro I use a lot on my laptop, its clean, its simple and has came a long way from the days of old. With the new Software Center and Unity Bar you can't really go wrong. The only thing Ubuntu lacks is big business software. There seems to be this thing about software you pay money for over something that is free, the free stuff just doesn't give people the same feeling as bought. So here is what I suggest, why not develop for Linux (Ubuntu)? I know plenty of people in design that if they knew a solid design application was out for Ubuntu they'd switch. It's gawna happen soon Serif, Steam(games) are encouraging people to develop their games for Linux for SteamOS. these game will be available on the Steam client for Ubuntu. Think about it, the more Steam pushes Linux, the more younger people will choose the free Linux OS distros that support steam clients. This means in the future there will be a pretty good opening for a solid design studio on Linux. Being the Adobe of the Linux world wouldn't be a bad thing, since the power house Adobe refuse to support Linux. https://forums.adobe.com/message/4728888 Think about it Serif.