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PANTONE color conversions should be performed in context of color profiles.

Typically RGB values (incl. hexadecimal) are shown for sRGB color profile, which for PANTONE 7733 C is #007041 (sRGB 0, 112, 65), as is shown also when viewing the Color panel in Affinity apps:

pmsconversions.jpg.eb74eb7bdc5175f65d34dab72185b74b.jpg

You might have searched the nearest PANTONE match for the hex value #006A3A, which would be 7733C in Solid Coated V4 library:

pmsconversions_website.jpg.7b03db616bef01a4222f6b0d50e5abe0.jpg

As for CMYK conversion, color profile needs to be specified, as well (in the screenshot above from Affinity Publisher the CMYK color profie is ISO Coated v2 (ECI)). I am not sure on which profile the values given on the web site are based, but in PANTONE Color Manager, which lets pick the color profile, the following conversion values are given:

pmsconversions_pantonecolormanager.jpg.b1c77da131ee62c146c874a487044aea.jpg

...and in the same context color illuminant (lighting condition) is also specified, which has effect on the expressed CMYK values, as well. The values are very close to ones shown in Affinity Color panel, and approximately same values are also shown in InDesign, when the document RGB color profile is sRGB and CMYK profile ISO Coated v2 (ECI):

pms_rgb_id.jpg.15621a4aa5a068b09d5d2a8ec480a7c9.jpg

pms_cmyk_id.jpg.8bb892ab9c1189955b6c25207117abb0.jpg

 

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1 hour ago, Lagarto said:

I am not sure on which profile the values given on the web site are based

The numbers on websites, including Pantones website, are "dumb" numbers. That is, they are based upon a non-color managed environment using as their base hexadecimal values. Basically one can consider them only in the context of an rgb environment

As regards their profiled usage, Serif applications use rgb values for the solid coated/uncoated (lIke the GOE, Pastels, etc.) and cmyk values where indicated in their name. Serif should use LAB definitions for a proper conversion to whatever color model and profile a document is using.

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6 minutes ago, MikeW said:

The numbers on websites, including Pantones website, are "dumb" numbers.

I assumed that they could be same as on their printed guides like Color Bridge Coated, which according to their description, are based on "CMYK values produced using G7 methodology" -- whatever that means, goes well beyond my comprehension. Anyway, the values given on the web site (or appearing on printed guides) naturally differ from values shown when inputting actual color profiles, but basically not much more than values shown by Pantone Color Manager with specific profiles differ from ones used by color managed apps like Adobe and Affinity apps using identical profiles.

However the diverse sites that exist on the Internet and perform CMYK conversions are more or less useless in print production. 

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By their nature, the Bridge palettes use canned cmyk values. We use to need to tweak the values when I worked at/for a service bureau to obtain closer matches to the Bridge printed guides and/or the spot color printed guides when not actually using spot inks.

PCM uses lab values. The conversions it makes will vary depending on the profile used and will/can differ little to greatly when switching profiles. I also have PCM (even though it's a piece of crap--even their tech support considers it so).

The printed guides use a single profile (no choice which one) printed to a particular paper and are only representative even if your print service is using the exact same profile to the exact same paper. Even then if measured the resulting print will vary from the printed guides.

Adobe applications once used cmyk values for representing the spot inks. It was a great day for many when Adobe switched to lab values--but for some it wreaked havoc when reprinting work based on the prior swatches and/or attempting to match prior printed work. I don't know if Adobe is still shipping both versions. Corel did once upon a time. This mostly matters when attempting to reproduce spot via cmyk inks, though Pantone has been known to change formula ratios in their inks too.

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