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Timber

Soft Proof Question

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Hi, working in Designer Mac, I've got an ad that I'm working on... my normal printer uses an ICC color profile of US Web Coated SWOP V2 and it looks on screen fine and prints out fine. Another print company that I'm sending the work to uses GRACol G7 GALCol2013_GRPC6 ICC and when I soft proof with this ICC profile the overall design looks like I put a light gray blanket over it. Question, can I use an overall color layer adjust that compensates for this? Or do I need to tweak each color as best I can? Thanks in advance!!!!

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Also then, does setting or changing the Color profile in Document Setting change the way one views the colors on screen? If so, then what's the difference in setting color there vs viewing with a Soft Proof layer?

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1 hour ago, Timber said:

Also then, does setting or changing the Color profile in Document Setting change the way one views the colors on screen?

Yes of course, changing the docs color profile will influence what you see as colors on the screen (especially on higher grade wide gamut monitors), that's what color management is about here via document icc profiling. You can check with the color and info tools when grapping selected colors and inspecting their values.

1 hour ago, Timber said:

If so, then what's the difference in setting color there vs viewing with a Soft Proof layer?

Well as it's name implies the soft proof is just a feature for proofing and checking here, in order to see how colors will nearly look then and if those colors are inside or outside of the selected destination (printing) color gamut. Aka if they maybe need some tweaking and fixing here and there or not for the destination color space. You don't export your document with active soft proof layers for printing/prepress.

The difference is the handling of and for different devices here, a document is on screen shown and worked out on monitors in some higher grade (wider gamut) input working color space (additive colors). The destination color space instead for printing/output device, thus these usually do support only a subset of colors, a lower color space (subtractive colors for most printers). The OS systems color management engine software does the algorithmic mapping/conversion of the colors between those device color spaces by using input/output color profiles. It operates like a mediator here with the help and by using the color definitions in icc profiles. Input color spaces are for the monitor/scanner devices (ideally calibrated) and software document working spaces (sRGB, Adobe RGB, ROM RGB etc.). Output color spaces and their corresponding profiles for printers, imagesetters etc. are usually handled by the printer device drivers.


☛ Affinity Designer 1.7.1 ◆ Affinity Photo 1.7.1 ◆ OSX El Capitan

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