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msdobrescu

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  1. Like
    msdobrescu reacted to WHK102 in Affinity products for Linux   
    Excuse me, I try my best to try to understand as much as I can. I do not understand English, I only speak Spanish and I am making a great effort to use the Google translator and filter the writing errors that are possible for me.
    I have seen a very clear intention on your part to try to refute (with justification or not) most of the issues, but you are not impartial with respect to the existing editors, you are not able to assume where you are not right and then rebut. I understand that it will be difficult to find a point of flexibility where we can reach a mutual agreement. I do not know if you work for Afinity or you are a purist of the brand, but it is difficult to show our views and this can also cause confusion in people who have the ability to make decisions in the company and read your messages.
    With respect to the use of GPU on Wine, it is possible to perform a passthrough, but this requires that my operating system can not use the screen or that it has more than one screen and more than one graphics card. It costs less money to buy a Windows license. I do not think it is a comfortable, official or recommended alternative.
    Redhat will clearly never take a step to create a graphic design editor because it is not their vision or mission, Redhat is focused on servers and productivity in the management and administration of systems, it is like saying that a butcher shop softwares. Canonical is a bad example, they have very bad taste for design and do not give importance to the experience of the end user, to my point of view canonical is a company badly organized in many ways with a mentality of a grandfather of 90 years, so that you will hardly ever see that Canonical is dedicated to creating a graphic editor or more robust applications, they are very busy solving bugs and giving support with hardware compatibility, selling support, etc. Canonical never had a clear vision in this regard. I use ubuntu for convenience but in user environment I prefer Mac, although in tools and versatility I prefer gnu / linux, the problem is that there is nothing really useful like Photoshop or Afinity Photo for gnu / linux and I hope you understand me, but that causes a lot of frustration
    I do not agree with your fracas, anyway we both know that what you explain is not an absolute truth, your words I take it as a personal point of view only.
    My point of view is completely different from yours, a company must not only ensure to generate money as a main cause, I know that your workers need money and its owner too. A company must be based on principles, a company without a user can not exist, just as a government without people can not exist, a company is not a virus or a tumor, it must be a medicine that helps the body that we are all of us, giving a value added to the community through its services. For example, a bank must exist to maintain the economic stability of a country, but it also has tools that facilitate its use for people, through mobile applications, virtual executives, etc. Clearly there is a commercial competition, but I also believe that we should not be blind to people and believe that the world revolves around money. Large companies that have this mentality have grown enormously as has Go Outdoors, Virgin and the like.
    My opinion is not based on what I believe simply, but also on facts, studies and advice. I am not saying that your arguments are not based on studies, but I do say that my argument can be as valid as yours, although I must admit that under my arguments the business models work better.
    It is impressive to recognize that it is necessary to reach this point trying to argue commercial points of view to try to explain the need to have a technical tool.
    If the creator of Krita has stressed that his software is not a replacement for Photoshop it is because he clearly wants to avoid lawsuits, I have used Krita and Photoshop and it is largely a brazen but legal copy.
    Or that looks like legal issues.
    Sorry, but for your comments, it did not look like it.
    With regard to the use of color profiles, I give you every reason.
    I mean the total number of users that we publish. If 100000000 use your graphic editor but 10000 use the other software, it does not mean that it has few users (I guess it happens in a similar way when trying to compare the possible users of graphic editors between windows and linux. If linux has a low percentage of users this does not mean that the numerical quantity is low.).
    In the other topics that you mention, they are redundant topics that we already argued and would be in an infinite loop.
    I can conclude personally:
    If you were working in my company I would hire you as a programmer and not for the business area definitely.
    I think your arguments in several points are valid, but in others, no, anyway your arguments, whether they have a real basis or not, are not official, which is why I prefer a "good debate", but not to understand what the company in charge of Afinity really thinks about it. Even they may have a mentality totally contrary to yours, so, try to continue to refute your views would be like doing it with the person sitting next to me, we would only have conclusions but without any progress.
    It would be interesting, as once happened in the Adobe forum, that we could see the response of a person who can give an answer in an official way (or as close as possible to the official) about whether someday they will have intentions or not to launch your products for the Linux environment.
    I feel that somehow, all of us who have debated in this thread have lost time. I do not mean that the points of view discussed here are not valid, but we have been discussing an important issue only among ourselves without knowing the company's point of view, so even if we have millions of answers, the company can simply observe comfortably without pronouncing about it.
    I have also concluded that my comments about a blind company without vision does not necessarily apply to this since we do not know how to think. This opens a gap in the possibility that some day we may see some application for Linux.
    I hope that over time we can see a real solution for Gnu / Linux users. I hope that this race for money does not end up affecting people negatively (more than what they have already done). I do not want to say that the commercial world has not created great things, but just as it has created them, it has also destroyed them.
    Science, art, philosophy, bases of many civilizations, not everything in life or in the growth of the human being is translated into money.
    As long as I live, I will try to believe that it is still possible.
     
  2. Like
    msdobrescu reacted to LucasKA in Affinity products for Linux   
    I'm not criticizing you or your budget. It's pretty awesome there's even a zero cost solution that can compete with enterprise lock in, and anything given back is very much appreciated I'm sure. There's a contingent of people who will never give any money for software because of digital entitlement. Often, they are very vocal.

    Photopea might be a competitor to Affinity Photo, but not Affinity Design. It looks like a Raster editor. Could be fine for basic editing, but I don't find GIMP to be cumbersome as you do, in fact I find Photoshop to be cumbersome. Anyone used to 10+ years of one UI is going to find a different UI cumbersome as you learn the flow. That doesn't discount GIMP as a competitor, as much as your own preference. CMYK, that actually is a useful feature that GIMP lacks.

    Photopea lacks artboards, symbols and vector layers which is a modern design workflow, and also it seems to be Nagware with a GIANT AD on the right that takes up like 25% of my real estate.

    Steam runs great on Linux, but not all games support Linux so you are going to run into an issue where some of your games wont run.
    Also, you are now locked into Serif's file format (.afdesign and whatever photo), which is arguably worse than being locked into PSD, since Affinity isn't industry standard (as bad as that standard is), so if you move to another photo editing software you wont have an affinity converter.
  3. Like
    msdobrescu reacted to ashf in Affinity products for Linux   
    Anyone tried CrossOver?
    Popular Windows software works on Linux with this.
    https://www.codeweavers.com/products

    Or Virtualize it such as with VIrtualBox/Vmware.

    I think It might be good idea to run a Crowd Funding to raise the fund for Linux version since actual demand from Linux user is unknown.
     
  4. Like
    msdobrescu got a reaction from SrPx in Affinity products for Linux   
    @SrPx, I feel that pain as you do even at hobbyist level, or occasional designer (I need that sometimes, the companies I work with need that expertise sometimes and need integrate things like EPS in their apps). IMHO, a hobbyist has less patience, needs more simple achieving features than pros, they don't have the designers education. so they tend to be more difficult to please. They afford to say "go away" and pick something else that fulfills their needs fast.
    Still, there is a niche that somebody must fill sometime.
    I have friends that refused helping free software with their advice for not being paid for that, yet complaining for not having those free tools on the right path.
    Me, I would buy as hobbyist the designer and the photo gems from Affinity, but on Linux, because, lately, I moved to it.
    Since last two biannual big releases of Windows, when they have broke the hardware virtualisation on my board and Windows can't boot anymore until I disable it in BIOS, I think thoroughly if I need a long session under Windows, in order to go through the pain of setting it in BIOS forth and back, just to process my photos in PS. So, my dream is to get rid of Windows. Can't tell you how long it took to figure out the source of the problem... The VM is a must on my PC lately, you know... (for second Linux KDE development, that became amazingly easy lately).
  5. Thanks
    msdobrescu reacted to Meteo in An attempt to run Affinity Designer on Linux via Wine   
    Hi, I've made an attempt to run Affinity Designer on Linux via Wine. I managed to run the program myself, but it is not possible to create or edit a document. The problem is probably with Direct3D support in Wine or in my GPU (maybe drivers).
    I will describe how to install and run the Designer via Wine. Maybe someone can successfully create or edit a document (eg with a different GPU). The operating system used is Ubuntu 18.04.
    What we need?
    Windows (yes, I know) - it can be a virtual machine. It will be used to extract the installation of the program because the standard installer does not work under the Wine.
    Wine with some patches - we must add MoveFileTransactedA/W stubs to kernel32. The building of Wine is required.
    Winetricks.
    64-bit mscms.dll library.
    Affinity Designer installer and license.
    Offline installer of .NET Framework 4.0 and .NET Framework 4.7.2.
    Step 1 – build Wine
    We must build and install 64-bit and 32-bit Wine with patch. Building of Wine on Ubuntu is very well described on the WineHQ wiki: Building Biarch Wine On Ubuntu. Don't forget to apply the patch from attachment (fix.patch). During the building process I installed additional libraries like libvulkan-dev and libvkd3d.
    Step 2 – create MSI installer of Designer
    This step must be done on Windows. Open the command line (cmd.exe) and go to the directory where the Affinity Designer installer is located. Run the affinity-designer.exe /extract command (the file name may be different). Complete the required data and create an MSI installer. Transfer the created MSI file to your system with Wine.
    Step 3 – install Winetricks
    The Winetricks installation is described on the project page: Winetricks. I prefer a manual installation of latest Winetricks instead install outdated version from repo.
    Step 4 – create Wine prefix and install .Net framework
    Installation of .Net Framework with Winetricks doesn't work for me, that's why I do it manually.
    Initialize new Wine prefix:
    WINEPREFIX=~/Designer wineboot –init Change the system to Windows XP (for correct installation of .Net Framework 4.0) and remove the mono if installed:
    WINEPREFIX=~/Designer winetricks winxp WINEPREFIX=~/Designer winetricks remove_mono Download and install .NET Framework 4.0:
    wget 'http://download.microsoft.com/download/9/5/A/95A9616B-7A37-4AF6-BC36-D6EA96C8DAAE/dotNetFx40_Full_x86_x64.exe' WINEPREFIX=~/Designer wine ./dotNetFx40_Full_x86_x64.exe /q Change the system to Windows 7 and switch mscoree to native (this is very important):
    WINEPREFIX=~/Designer winetricks win7 WINEPREFIX=~/Designer winecfg Download and install .NET Framework 4.7.2:
    wget 'http://download.microsoft.com/download/D/D/3/DD35CC25-6E9C-484B-A746-C5BE0C923290/NDP47-KB3186497-x86-x64-AllOS-ENU.exe' WINEPREFIX=~/Designer wine ./NDP47-KB3186497-x86-x64-AllOS-ENU.exe /q  
    Step 5 - run Affinity Designer
    Switch system to Windows 8.1 or 10. Designer will not start in Windows 7 mode due to Aero errors.
    WINEPREFIX=~/Designer winetricks win81 Install Affinity Designer (in my case MSI installer is Affinity.msi)
    WINEPREFIX=~/Designer wine msiexec /passive /i ./Affinity.msi Copy the missing mscms.dll library to Affinity Designer instalation directory. In my case it is ~/Designer/drive_c/Program Files/Affinity/Affinity Designer/. I have found the missing library on dlldownloader.com: mscms.dll.
    Start Affinity Designer:
    WINEPREFIX=~/Designer wine "C:\Program Files\Affinity\Affinity Designer\Designer.exe" The program should start and you will see the welcome screen.
    I can open preferences and change options, but creating a new document causes a crash. In Performance tab my GPU is displayed as Intel(R) HD Graphivs 4000 (I have Intel® UHD Graphics 620).
    Crash report:
    Attempting to create Direct3D device with adapter Intel(R) HD Graphics 4000 c:\buildagent10\work\live\persona\windows\libraries\serif.directx\dxrenderer.cpp(676): error 0x80004001 (Unknown error 0x80004001) In the last step I tried to start the Designer using Vulkan-based D3D10/D3D11 implementation. After this (and install mesa-vulkan-drivers) in Performance tab my GPU is displayed correctly, but the program still crash while creating a new document.
    WINEPREFIX=~/Designer winetricks dxvk Crash report:
    Attempting to create Direct3D device with adapter Intel(R) UHD Graphics 620 (Kabylake GT2) c:\buildagent10\work\live\persona\windows\libraries\serif.directx\dxrenderer.cpp(676): error 0x80004001 (Unknown error 0x80004001) I know that Serif developers don't provide support for running Affinity programs via Wine. The post is for information purposes only.


    fix.patch
  6. Like
    msdobrescu got a reaction from SrPx in Affinity products for Linux   
    @SrPx, I feel that pain as you do even at hobbyist level, or occasional designer (I need that sometimes, the companies I work with need that expertise sometimes and need integrate things like EPS in their apps). IMHO, a hobbyist has less patience, needs more simple achieving features than pros, they don't have the designers education. so they tend to be more difficult to please. They afford to say "go away" and pick something else that fulfills their needs fast.
    Still, there is a niche that somebody must fill sometime.
    I have friends that refused helping free software with their advice for not being paid for that, yet complaining for not having those free tools on the right path.
    Me, I would buy as hobbyist the designer and the photo gems from Affinity, but on Linux, because, lately, I moved to it.
    Since last two biannual big releases of Windows, when they have broke the hardware virtualisation on my board and Windows can't boot anymore until I disable it in BIOS, I think thoroughly if I need a long session under Windows, in order to go through the pain of setting it in BIOS forth and back, just to process my photos in PS. So, my dream is to get rid of Windows. Can't tell you how long it took to figure out the source of the problem... The VM is a must on my PC lately, you know... (for second Linux KDE development, that became amazingly easy lately).
  7. Like
    msdobrescu reacted to SrPx in Affinity products for Linux   
    Is not difficult for me, I started in the early years of console-only. It is for both professionals and average users I know. Almost a 90% of those that I find.  I've only managed that my father kind of tolerates Libre Office, but only over Windows, and 'cause I'm constantly at his place teaching him to use it. When I say I have tried a lot of people to use Linux, I really mean it. installed a bunch of distros for people through the years.
    For a pro... Well, a lot pro graphic devices have no Linux drivers ( I have a bunch here that don't. Lucky me , I use Windows). Yep, not Linux's fault, but in the end the pro needs to be pragmatic. Color management is possible but quite more cumbersome and less flexible than in both Mac and Windows.  then there's the lack of  graphic software for many matters (not just the issue of a PS, AI and ID replacement. If that'd be all, lol... )
    Well, I am not a programmer, while I am indeed pro in several graphic fields. And while I agree that the UIs are quite non intuitive, and what is way, way worse for a pro, they are slower than the pro options in Mac and Windows : More clicks, more steps, less fluidity (also less options and key features for pro market, not available). And that's indeed more critical . You can learn a hard UI. I learnt XSI and Blender, and neither was easy to learn (neither was VIM, for a graphic, visual worker...). But you need them to be fast. That said : I made pro work with the 3, at a pair of companies, not as a hobby (so, I know quite what I'm talking about)  , for print even. And... fun facts : Try to make a perfect espiral that distributes elements along it (or just an espiral) with *cough* other nice pro apps. Well, you can in Inkscape. Also, it has a trace solution embedded (is potrace, but well embedded)  . Not that I need it very much, but is sth present in AI and not in Designer. Is just one bad example (tho a lot of ppl cry for the feature) , but there are many things that Inskcape, gimp, and Scribus DO particularly well in some things, in a small few, better than in the CC. Have you noticed that several POD companies have even specs to deliver to them the stuff from Scribus ? Well, I have. And I dislike the tool's UI way, way more than Inkscape's or Gimp's.  If you are a hobbyist in what is graphics, but a professional in programming, you might have not noticed some of those many things. The caligraphy tool, the actual inking tool in Inkscape is superb, very flexible in settings, is great for comic inking, for example, but also for any line-art work.
    Indeed, the Linux community has done this of stagnating  and not helping those three, since always : underrating the existing tools, so, they never make a big effort to help them, while the potential in the 3 is immense (GEGL arriving to Gimp is going to be *absolutely* revolutionary)..  But if the consideration about them keeps the same, yeah,  the apps continue the same, and without any help, over the years..
    The entire graphics production field (/s) is far from being just handling RAWs...
  8. Like
    msdobrescu reacted to Renzatic in Affinity products for Linux   
    Given that they'd have to require people wanting to opt in on Linux to buy another license to cover the costs of the port, cannibalizing their own user base probably wouldn't be much of a concern there, since it wouldn't equate to a sell lost to allow some of their users to make a lateral move.
     And yes, there are very likely a number of people both in the Linux world, and those waiting for an excuse to jump into Linux who are just looking for an excuse to hand Serif their money. The question is, how large is this demographic? How much money could Serif make off of them? Could they, if they don't make an immediate profit on their hard work, at least get a return on the money sunk porting the software? There are a lot of ifs, ands, and buts surrounding supporting Linux. Tons of maybes, no guarantees.
    Just because a specific business model worked spectacularly for those two companies (or a company and a foundation) doesn't necessarily mean it'll work just as well for Serif. Consider the difference between the three. 
    Red Hat is a company that offers 24/7/365 support to other companies that rely on their software to maintain their internal infrastructure. They're as much a service as they are a software vendor, a very high priced one, and they hire hundreds upon hundreds of people to maintain this service for all their clients. Their use of open source code is something of an aside, considering the product they're really selling isn't their software, they give that away, they're selling their help and reliability.
    That's a business model that just wouldn't work for Serif, who offer software that's self contained, and doesn't need to be maintained by highly trained professionals on a daily basis. They couldn't get away with the prices Red Hat charges.
    And Blender? Next to the Linux kernel itself, it's probably THE darling of the FOSS scene. It's a powerful piece of software that attracts tons of talent, has a head developer/manager who's practically on a first name basis with his entire following (hell, I think I might even have said something to Ton at one point), and enjoys massive amounts of mindshare. Blender is in a pretty unique position, and is reaping the benefits of being there.
    Now Serif is slowly and surely gaining a positive reputation for their work, and they obviously have a number of talented coders in their employ, but using a for-profit, closed sourced model to sell licenses for their software probably means that people won't be quite as generous with their money as they are with the Blender Foundation, and taking donations to support further work outside of their usual revenue stream would probably be filled with tons of legal boondoggles, along with potential hits to their reputation if things don't go 100% according to plan at all times.
  9. Like
    msdobrescu reacted to LucasKA in Affinity products for Linux   
    There's no way to answer that chicken/egg reliably.
    Wether or not it would would move people to Linux is the wrong question IMO, but rather, does it solve a need that enough Linux users have well enough for people to pay for it, and would that revenue be enough to justify development?
     
     
  10. Like
    msdobrescu reacted to Renzatic in Affinity products for Linux   
    I'd say Serif's reticence to target Linux is mostly due to that platform being a weak option among their target demographic. They pander mostly to the print, advertisement, web design, and Photography crowds, which are strongest on Macs, have a solid base on Windows, and are almost nonexistent on Linux. The one group that's strong on Linux that the Affinity line might appeal to, the 3D pros and enthusiasts, likely only make up a fractional portion of Serif's entire audience.
    You could say that the major reason why the above mentioned people aren't strong on Linux is due to a lack of a good choice of programs that cater to them there, the chicken and egg argument. It's very possible that Serif releasing the Affinity line could cause a number of people to flock to Linux. I could see how it would appeal to web designers, considering it's a 'nix OS, with all the nice 'nix OS features they know and love, that's built to support coding from the ground up. Being able to do design work there as well would be perfect for them. Straight up digital graphics designers would like it too, since they're usually not all that concerned about the OS, so much as the programs they use. There's a lot of potential for them to make a ton of money on Linux.
    ...but it's all theoretical. It could be a massive success, making them unexpected millions, or it could fall flat on its face, losing them tons of money in an attempt that garners them no extra support. Considering Serif is a pretty small company, already supporting three programs across two platforms, they've probably come to the conclusion that the consequences of failure are just too high for them to take, even for the potential rewards
    It sucks, sure. I'd love to have the Affinity suite on Linux. It'd provide me the perfect excuse to happily abandon Windows were they to do so. But it's obviously not gonna happen anytime soon, so...meh.
  11. Like
    msdobrescu reacted to Renzatic in Affinity products for Linux   
    To be fair, there's really no such thing as an entirely intuitive, easy to pick up and use 3D editor. If you were to take a stark newbie, set them down in front of Max, Maya, Modo, and Blender, and tell them to make a little house in each one, after everything's said and done, they're going to tell you that the experience was like choosing between four different ways of getting punched in the face. They're all pretty esoteric, and not very friendly.
  12. Like
    msdobrescu reacted to Patrick Connor in Affinity products for Linux   
    @eoughu
    Welcome to the Serif Affinity forums
    I don't believe that Serif think that Linux users aren't willing to pay, and as you can see there a number of informed and uninformed views in this thread.
  13. Like
    msdobrescu reacted to Renzatic in Affinity products for Linux   
    Darktable is a solid piece of software. It can come surprisingly close to Lightroom in output quality, with a price that can't be beat.
    But GIMP? Maybe I'm being a little too hard on it. I dunno. I've heard it's improved by a goodly amount over its past few updates. But from my experiences with it, it remains the only piece of software that's actually managed to make me angry. I remember the trials and tribulations I had to go through just trying to save an image as a .jpg file. You don't just hit Ctrl-Shift-S, and save it as a .jpg file. Oh no. It can't be simple like it is in PS. You have to export it, otherwise it'll always save it as an .xcf file. That just made me so mad...
    Now I'm using Affinity Photo, which pretty much does the exact same thing. Sometimes life is just unbearably cruel.
    Oh, and props for having what's easily the most awesomest user avatar on the site.
  14. Like
    msdobrescu reacted to NNois in Affinity products for Linux   
    Ahh? I assume you're working for Serif ? no, you're saying that just because you don't want their product on Linux for whatever reason.

    Man, 50% of Pro Linux Software exist because big client with many seats wants software in the environment they are working. (The rest are on Linux because they are made on Linux first)
    So If tomorrow let says a big studio contact serif and put enough money on the table I assure you Serif will make the conversion.

    Plus, I'm sure the conversion isn't so hard if they want it, nowadays recent program code isn't so tied to the OS which was not the case in the 2000's.
    Serif already made the Windows version, unless they're completely crazy they already made their code 90 to 95% OS independent
     
  15. Like
    msdobrescu reacted to SrPx in Affinity products for Linux   
    Well, yes, the option is not there, in Windows Home. But if the Windows Update service is actually stopped, it wont update (just like with Defender, I'd do the registry trick, but there are options for that other thing in Home, just buried). Yes, once reactivated it will do it, no matter what. Is due to the excuse of Windows now being a SaaS (software as a service...or that they say.. but... there's no subscription...well, of windows itself...) , and supposedly because it brings less headaches to them as the other way there were a lot more configurations/rare cases to support. Is like happens in consoles compared to PCs. They probably love a more limited environment like an Xbox, or a ...fridge, lol.  An ok excuse if the patches actually were minimally tested previous a deploy... 
    [Edit: I removed the rest... it was extremely long once I saw it posted, lol . ]
    [well, finally left it with the spoiler command, just for the too brave (or crazy). ]
  16. Like
    msdobrescu got a reaction from SrPx in Affinity products for Linux   
    SrPx, as being so kind and nice and balanced, I answer you this, as you deserve an explanation: there are important Linux segments that need those tools. I don't agree wih the opinion of Linux having no consistent business segment or having none or all. Some here are saying there is no value in Linux etc.. It is, even though they accept it or not. There are many guys making big  money or making a living with Linux. If a company can't or doesn't take it into account, it's other story.
    A "pure designer" is one with a degree in design, knowing to do design for some field and making a living from it by simply drawing stuff in 2d or 3d tools. But there are crossovers, like software developers that need to design UIs, which are technical and often need to work on some other OS that their tools are built for. For these, it's a pain to maintain several OS'es just to do their job.
  17. Thanks
    msdobrescu reacted to mzzfdrc in Affinity products for Linux   
    One more point I forgot about:
    They might be missing a business opportunity to port their software to Linux and market it to those brave enough to try moving away from Windows (and probably in the "experimental" mindset already). Even if just 100k designers (less than 1% of CC users)  tried Linux and Affinity, it's still 5.5m euros to be made. I can see it being suggested as an alternative to students who do not want to deal with Windows and have no money for Mac - I'd be suggesting it to friends for sure. Is it not enough for a port? The Linux community happily does QA for software, thousands are working on the Steam Play compatibility since it came out last month.
     
  18. Thanks
    msdobrescu reacted to mzzfdrc in Affinity products for Linux   
    Sure there are, lol.
    Full stack development has been a big thing for like 8-9 years now. And whether you do LAMP or MERN or MEAN or whatever, you're doing OSS in a way or another (even by inner sourcing), dealing with tools and libraries meant to be running on Linux. Microsoft had to make the Linux subsystem for Windows and Bash for Windows for a reason: developers had enough and are moving away, many to macOS because of the Creative Suite, and also some to Linux. We do have to deal with graphic files too, or in my case, we work inside such programs too, so we have to use workarounds, though my Windows XP machine starts fast AF (under 20 seconds) and I could sometimes remember to freeze it instead of just powering it off lol.
    Professionals in the devops field just use Linux. Developers use Unix in general so they can deal with Apple shenanigans and Adobe. Using Linux or Unix on a desktop is added pleasure because everything is just better and more explicative - no more "you aren't admin" or "error 0xsomething refer to this outdated knowledge base". You're the actual owner of your machine.
    Supporting OSS is a no brainer. Millions of people in the world use Chrome, Firefox to do their jobs. Entire industries flourish on it.
    Let me fix that for you: you have elected to use a system that the software you wish to run does not support.
    I don't think Linus Torvalds said "Affinity Designer? Not on my kernel!"
  19. Like
    msdobrescu got a reaction from SrPx in Affinity products for Linux   
    No, you've got it wrong. First of all, I don't say you try to shut me up. You really have arguments. And not Serif at all. Other guys, not all.
    And I do not attack Windows. I have pointed some issues that came lately on many of my colleagues machines.
    I don't think somebody would agree with collecting their data, though.
    About my bachelor, I point out that I know what means to have maths and especially statistics as a background. From my point of view, is a total waste of time if you don't do your studies of some sort in order to achieve results in some field. And those are usually additional to the bachelor itself. For me, it's just a practical thing to have a diploma, not a goal. The interships I've done during that were priceless.
  20. Like
    msdobrescu got a reaction from Wosven in Affinity products for Linux   
    Because you have to. "Have to" means - as far as I know English, not being a native speaker, obviously - "you are obliged", "you must do it forcibly, like it or not". I know it isn't natural, actually, as software developer, is the main sin of my fellow programmers, due to the costs. So those costs are transferred to the user, more and more consistently. It is not profitable for the softweare maker, in the end. This is another vicious circle. Still, users must suffer nowadays, when they should not. Would you pay $1500 for a bullet proof OS license? Years ago, the budget spent by Microsoft for a single small patch, known as KB12345678 or similar, was of $100,000. They release so many, imagine the costs.
    Yet, while is true for the car, was so handy when you could fix your car. It is not the emission, it is the sophistication needed to optimize it. Some features are too geek also, I would love to have a simple stereo instead of a smartphone in my car, I find it crazy to flip-flip-flip just to adjust the temperature. But you still could add yourself liquids for breaks, cooling, screen. You must check your oil level, and must do it properly. You must be able to fix a tire or to adjust the proper pressure. This is overwhelming for many too. But in the mountains, here, we still have roads where there is no mobile signal and cars are rare, it is safe to know to handle some small issues yourself.
  21. Like
    msdobrescu got a reaction from SrPx in Affinity products for Linux   
    Indeed, this is my issue: time and energy spent to solve OS-related problems.
    Lately, just lately, I had to spend more time with Windows to harness it at update time. Somehow it broke in every aspect, so I had to do one of the two below:
    - re-install it completely + my software of interest re-installed and reconfigured
    - spend weeks to find out why it can't go further, other people on the Internet just complaining of the same issue, but having no fix yet
    That along with the OS collecting data on me, but that data seeming to be related to something else than finding out the cause for the crash.
    And it decides to upgrade and tries for at least an hour, then rolling back again and again (luckily being able to restore the previous state).
    Next time I won't have the same recipe to fix it, I know, lately, each time was a different source.
    Now it was the color calibration software + grub. The cause is pretty generically described to the user by some hex code that means one of a few tens causes, still not all included.
    This was a nightmare.
    Ahh, I've forgot, different issues on different machines for the same upgrade. On one machine was nice: it has wiped all the drivers only! But worked after re-installing them.
    On the third, it messed up the network at some low level . Was hopeless, we had to re-install it. And so on.

    On Linux it takes time if you don't know how to do. I have maintained a Sabayon Linux since version 5 and upgraded successfully once a week. Sure, I've had some problems too, but worked to restore it each time in hours, with the community support too.

    Ideally for me is to have one OS with my (few) softwares. I don't work as @SrPx with so many. BTW, mine is a i7 920.
  22. Like
    msdobrescu reacted to R C-R in Affinity products for Linux   
    I think it is quite obvious that some "pros" (however you want to define that term) would use Linux versions of the Affinity apps & some would not. The issue -- the only one that really matters -- is if enough would buy & use them to make it worth it to Serif to develop & support those versions. Twenty more pages of heartfelt assurances from Linux users that enough would is not going to change anything. That is because it is based on inferences & guesswork rather than hard data & market research, & because nobody outside of the company has any way of knowing what it would take to do that.
    Everything else, including which OS various people like best or have had the most or least trouble with, is irrelevant.
  23. Like
    msdobrescu reacted to toltec in Affinity products for Linux   
    I've just had a brainwave.
    What would really improve Linux is if there was some really good graphics software available for it.
    I wonder why nobody has thought of that before ?
  24. Like
    msdobrescu reacted to R C-R in Affinity products for Linux   
    Useful arguments for what? There has not been a new argument in this topic since page two or so. It is all just recycling the same things over & over.
  25. Thanks
    msdobrescu got a reaction from toltec in Affinity products for Linux   
    With you, I don't feel lonely anymore!
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