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  1. From Arkshuk, [John] Rae also learned about Inuit beliefs: It is said that many years ago, not long after the creation of the world, there was a mighty conjuror (Esquimaux of course) who gained so much power that at last he raised himself up into the heavens, taking with him his sister (a beautiful girl) and a fire. To the latter he added great quantities of fuel, which thus formed the sun. For some time he and his sister lived in great harmony, but at last they disagreed, and he, in addition to maltreating the lady In many ways, at last scorched one side of her face. She had suffered patiently all sorts of indignities, but the spoiling of her beauty was not to be borne; she therefore ran away from him and formed the moon, and continues so until this day. Her brother is still in chase of her, but although he sometimes gets near, he will never overtakes her. When it is new moon, the burnt side of the face is towards us; when full moon, the reverse is the case. (Quoted in Fatal Passage, Ken McGoogan) John Rae ,FRS FRGS, (13 – 1893) was a Scottish surgeon who explored parts of northern Canada. (Wikipedia)
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