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Kasper-V

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About Kasper-V

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    Isle of Wight

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  1. She's very good! I haven't used pastels for a good many years, but I used to find that, being dry, so long as you could put your stroke in the right place it was a much easier medium than wet painting. Does your good lady use a mahl stick? It's a great way of keeping your sleeves out of your artwork.
  2. I did reduce the intensity of the chalk in the gaps, Aammppaa -- I could see towards the end of the process it didn't look right. But the paving is in a public space, and as far as I can tell from the original the 'gaps' are actually filled with a dark cement or mastic and the surface is nearly flush with the tiles. In hindsight, it struck me a better course might have been to lighten them to make them less conspicuous. Still, it's all part of life's learning curve!
  3. To stave off the boredom, I'm working from home. even though I've been retired for nearly four years! I saw a post on Facebook the other day, which I'm pretty sure was 'photoshopped' as it looked too good and the 'artist' was kneeling on his artwork. It was well made, but of course, I thought 'I can do that!' and I have. Credits: girl by Analise Benevides on Unsplash, pavement by Mabel Amber from Pixabay, Girl with pearl earring by Vermeer from Wikipedia, pastels from Google. Good fun -- I shall try another one in the near future.
  4. As far as I can tell, it does put in fewer nodes than 1.7 -- usually. I haven't experimented very much yet; I still have 1.7 on my old laptop, so I'll see what's what when I get down to it.
  5. I was just doodling with some shapes to try out the improved 'expand stroke', and this is what emerged. It started out as a coupe of cogs and an ellipse and a few Boolean operations, followed by a bit of inspiration and tweaking of nodes. When I was knee-high to a sketch pad, my grandfather -- a talented draughtsman -- told me to invoke inspiration by making a random scribble and seeing what it suggested. Good to see the technique still works in the digital age!
  6. Guys, my brain has taken a sabbatical! While I wait for it to come back, (a) no, it doesn't work without the century (unless you change the order of the digits a little, and (b) I must have meant 10/10/1010 (or possibly 01/01/0101, when probably nobody used that date format anyway, even without the leading zero). I wonder if any date palindromes work in Roman numerals? No, actually I don't care! I'm gonna go and lie down now
  7. Yes, it works in US and UK formats, and with/without the century. Last time this happened, so I'm told, was 01/01/1010, and most people outside the church wouldn't have had a clue what the date was!
  8. Thanks for the suggestion -- I'll play around and see what happens. I started off with a biggish image -- the one above is reduced -- and maybe an even bigger scale would help. I did think of using APh, but I didn't know if I was missing something in AD.
  9. I've got a problem or two with an AD thing I'm working on. This old console telly is one of the elements in a project I've set myself (details below).First, the different planes just won't butt up precisely: there's always a tiny gap, even though the stroke is turned off. I've found this before, and I don't think it's a side-effect of using the isometric projection.Second, how can I get a curved edge between the top panel and the sloping front and get the bitmap fill to follow the curve?
  10. No comment! I think the song lyrics confused YouTube's interpreter -- or my poor Saxon accent! A merry Christmas, anyway. PS Our tree is hiding in the attic somewhere -- we haven't seen it for four years!
  11. Well, I think it's near enough now, so here's this year's Christmas video. Made with Affinity Photo & Designer and Movie Plus X6. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GTJEneTyJ2U
  12. Thanks for the tip Rens -- in fact, I signed up with them not long ago. They are very good indeed, and I don't like to 'steal' other people's work.
  13. Thanks for the compliment! I keep going back when I can, it really is attractive. If I didn't live so far away I'd do a 'four seasons' project or something like that.
  14. A couple of offerings from a recent visit to Shugborough a couple of weeks ago (out of 150 photos!) ... And the very picturesque Trent and Mersey Canal behind the House ... And right behind me, the normally picturesque bridge and lock is not looking its best! I'll go back after the facelift is complete ...
  15. Originally published in 1897 as A Mad Song, Wandering Aengus (or The Golden Apples of the Sun) has been popular set to music, and it's haunted my since I first learnt it in the seventies. This image is a composite of two Unsplash photos, woodland by John Westrock and girl by Dylan Nolte. Sparkles, vignette and other fiddly bits by yours truly. I went out to the hazel wood, Because a fire was in my head, And cut and peeled a hazel wand, And hooked a berry to a thread; And when white moths were on the wing, And moth-like stars were flickering out, I dropped the berry in a stream And caught a little silver trout. When I had laid it on the floor I went to blow the fire a-flame, But something rustled on the floor, And someone called me by my name: It had become a glimmering girl With apple blossom in her hair Who called me by my name and ran And faded through the brightening air. Though I am old with wandering Through hollow lands and hilly lands, I will find out where she has gone, And kiss her lips and take her hands; And walk among long dappled grass, And pluck till time and times are done, The silver apples of the moon, The golden apples of the sun. The originals (reduced):--
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