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Nathan Shirley

Imported PDFs still printing rasterized

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1 hour ago, Lagarto said:

Here are printouts made from Publisher onto a Dell 3130cn laser printer (internal resolution 1200dpi). There is no practical difference in print quality whether the job is printed from an opened SVG (sent to the printer as vector data and rasterized by the printer at its maximum internal dpi, disregarding the default 300dpi setting of Publisher), or from an imported SVG (sent to the printer as a rasterized sheet resolution set at 1200dpi). As can be seen the latter has more details but when viewed from typical read distance, both look practically identical.

Given that the second (1200dpi) version is sharper, I'm curious how you concluded that the 300dpi setting in the first version was "disregarded"? And how you've concluded that the first version was sent as vector data rather than raster?

Have you tried the first version with the Publisher document set to 1200dpi for a more comparable test?

(I like the testing you're doing, I just don't completely understand it yet :) )


-- Walt

Windows 10 Home, version 1903 (18362.239), 16GB memory, Intel Core i7-6700K @ 4.00Gz, GeForce GTX 970
Affinity Photo 1.7.2.471 and 1.7.3.476 Beta   / Affinity Designer 1.7.2.471 and 1.7.3.476 Beta  / Affinity Publisher 1.7.2.471 and 1.7.3.475 Beta

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You mention that you experience low-resolution print quality issue also when you use SVG files printed from Publisher. Please try if opening the SVG file instead of importing (placing) makes any difference, or if you import (place) SVG files, setting the resolution at e.g. 1200 dpi (or maximum of you printer resolution) at print time, and ensuring from the Properties (from within Publisher Print dialog box) that you do not have any print optimizations checked that have effect on quality of output.

You also mentioned that you experience print problems when trying to print scores imported to Publisher either as PDF or SVG files. Do you mean that this happens also when you export a PDF file (e.g. X-4 mode or "(print)") mode and try to print it? In that case, which application do you use to print your pdf files (e.g., Adobe Acrobat, your browser, etc.). The PDF you provided was created from your notation software and it printed just fine, and when I have exported pdfs from either opened or imported PDF or SVG score you have provided, I have not been able to reproduce the problem.

It is possible that you have some printer driver issue, but it is strange if similar problems cannot be experienced when printing from other apps to the same printer. Printer settings however can be app-wide selections, depending on the printer and how it is connected to your system (e.g. on a local port or on network), so it is possible that you have a setting in the driver that forces e.g. 300 dpi or "fast" rasterization, and that affects only printing from Publisher.  

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47 minutes ago, walt.farrell said:

Given that the second (1200dpi) version is sharper, I'm curious how you concluded that the 300dpi setting in the first version was "disregarded"? And how you've concluded that the first version was sent as vector data rather than raster?

Based on the print file that was created (just about 36kB), compared with the about 1,600kB created when printing imported graphics (which gets pre-rasterized). Also, increasing the dpi setting when printing opened graphics (which is not pre-rasterized), does not increase the print file size. Also, when printing opened graphics and setting the resolution at e.g. 50dpi, the print quality is still the same.

The difference in sharpness between the standard 300 dpi vector/font-based printout, compared to 1200dpi prerasterized output, may be explained by driver optimizations and may be printer-specific. I do not know enough about print technology to be able to say whether there happens any smoothing out (aka. antialiasing) or optimization when printing vector graphics and fonts (as opposing rasterizing without such devices but using a higher accuracy) onto a modern laser printer (similarly as happens when rasterizing on a computer screen or on a low-resolution printer), but e.g. fonts (possibly also notation-related fonts) have hints that have some effect on printouts which can result in visually beautiful rendering, even if the data sent to the printer, when looked close enough, has more smudge and less detail. 

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