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Grzyb

White stroke / text dissapears in pdf for printing

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Hello, I found very frustrating problem in publisher ;/

What I did and what happend?

I am creating a photo album with pictures. Each photo is placed in picture frame and under that, I placed a black rectangle with white stroke (to give a photo nice, white frame).

When exporting to .tiff everythings fine. But I need to export it to pdf (I usually choose pdf x1). The white stroke disappears (even in basic preview in acrobat pro).

When I choose pdf preset to "pdf for print", the white stroke appears, but when I open that file on proofing printer software/ print on digital printer/ offset printer (just prepress software or even desktop printer), the white dissapears.

As I remember in beta I had a problem when I placed white text over photos in pdf (tiff was fine) (it disappeared in the same way).

I'm attaching every steps described above + .afpub file.

Are you working on that?

 

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white_problem.afpub

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I think this is an overprinting issue as the rectangle has a rich black fill. If you need the black fill create 2 rectangles one only with the fill and one with the only the border. You could also add a border by setting a stroke on the picture frame itself

This article explains it a bit

You'd probably want the overprint black option set in publisher for any text elements you would want to use


Living the Dream since 1964 - about 25 years left

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Your rectangle that is underneath the picture has strangely K100 (black 100%) color definition yet it appears as white. Changing K100 to K0 makes it truly white (or, if you use some other color space, e.g. RGB, setting it to R255G255B255). Perhaps this is a question of having converted the color value from one color space to another? 

Also, to keep it simpler, you could consider giving the picture frame itself a white stroke e.g. 4pt (and set it draw behind so that the stroke will not cover the picture).

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