Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I have made a number of posts in this Tutorials forum on how to do various things, mainly involving Distort > Equations. Many have also provided a macro that executes the operation. I have realized more recently that posts such as these, which are mainly presenting a macro would better fit in the Resources forum. 

I would welcome some guidance from moderators as to choosing the appropriate forum. My feeling is that a post that is mainly explaining a procedure, a 'how to' is best as a Tutorial, whereas a post presenting a finished product (a macro) is best as a Resource. There could be appropriate cross-referencing between the two if needs be.

Just to blur the issue, I note that the Tutorials forum often has posts which are asking for 'how to' explanations, which should perhaps belong in  the Questions forum.

Perhaps the mods  would include a sticky Guidelines for Tutrials at the top of the forum?

John


Windows 10, Affinity Photo 1.6.5.123 and Designer 1.6.5.123, (mainly Photo), now ex-Adobe CC

CPU: AMD A6-3670. RAM: 16 GB DDR3 @ 666MHz, Graphics: 2047MB NVIDIA GeForce GT 630

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the headline "Tutorials" is self-explanatory. Some of the posters are asking for a tutorial I think.
Yes, maybe a sticky post, but I don't think it would help much.  (And now we are using the forum for discussing it, not posting a tutorial.. ;) )

I think the moderators are generous, not pointing it out all the time. It contributes to a kind and gentle tone in the forum. Allthough the posters would get more attention to a post, posting it in the right forum. 

Just some thoughts from me. 


- Affinity Photo 1.6.7

- Affinity Designer 1.6.1

 

MacBook Pro 8 GB
MacBook Pro Mojave 10.14.2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Internet

Internet computer tutorials can take the form of a screen recording (screencast), a written document (either online or downloadable), interactive tutorial, or an audio file, where a person will give step by step instructions on how to do something.

Tutorials usually have the following characteristics:

  • A presentation of the view usually explaining and showing the user the user interface
  • A demonstration of a process, using examples to show how a workflow or process is completed; often broken up into discrete modules or sections.
  • Some method of review that reinforces or tests understanding of the content in the related module or section.
  • A transition to additional modules or sections that builds on the instructions already provided. Tutorials can be linear or branching.

While many writers refer to a mere list of instructions or tips as a tutorial, this usage can be misleading.

Quote

Computer-based tutoring

In computer-based education, a tutorial is a computer program whose purpose is to assist users in learning how to use parts of a software product such as an office suite or any other application, operating system interface, programming tool, or video game. There are three kinds of software tutorials: 1) video tutorials that the user views, 2) interactive tutorials where the user follows on-screen instructions (and—in some cases—watches short instruction movies), whereupon he/she does the tutorial exercises and receives feedback depending on his/her actions; and 3) webinars where users participate in real-time lectures, online tutoring, or workshops remotely using web conferencing software.

 


☛ Affinity Designer 1.6.1 ◆ Affinity Photo 1.6.7 ◆ OSX El Capitan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@v_kyr, I thank you for an up-to-date summary of online tutoring. I retired twelve years ago, but the latter part of my career involved much on-line tutoring. I have to admit that the online tutoring world has moved on considerably since my day. Personally, I prefer a static web-page tutorial to a video-based one. I could do interactive, but not on these forums.

John


Windows 10, Affinity Photo 1.6.5.123 and Designer 1.6.5.123, (mainly Photo), now ex-Adobe CC

CPU: AMD A6-3670. RAM: 16 GB DDR3 @ 666MHz, Graphics: 2047MB NVIDIA GeForce GT 630

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Madame said:

(And now we are using the forum for discussing it, not posting a tutorial.. ;) )

A nice point (as the lawyers are fond of saying). And here I am compounding it!

John


Windows 10, Affinity Photo 1.6.5.123 and Designer 1.6.5.123, (mainly Photo), now ex-Adobe CC

CPU: AMD A6-3670. RAM: 16 GB DDR3 @ 666MHz, Graphics: 2047MB NVIDIA GeForce GT 630

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×