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A client of mine asked me for a 576 cm x 276 cm (68031 x 32598 px) banner for outside use. The printer wants a PDF/x-1a:2003 PDF file. So this is what i did:

  • made a document in Affinity Designer in document set up of 576 x 276 cm / 300dpi / Print (Press-Ready)
  • copy/past the logo (developed in Affinity Designer all vector) and put a text under it, that's it
  • chose export preset PDF (for print) 300dpi (also stated nothing will be rasterised)
  • the esitated file size was 481.58 kb so very small
  • send it to printer and got it back that the file was way to small which i already was afraid of

I had to export a eps of the whole thing and imported it in photoshop in a document with the sizes i wanted and exported it.

What happened here and what did i do wrong?

 

 

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Might be something do do with the maximum page size within a PDF file. Used to be around 5.5 meters. Best to talk with your printer.  Maybe work at 50% and get your printer to scale up 200%.


Windows 7 Pro, I5 3.3G PC 16G RAM

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@mickrose: Thanks, i will look into that. But i have another example, i have a document of 98 x 48 cm and export to pdf in AD, the size is 541 kb, when i open the pdf in photoshop and export it to pdf again the file size is 5,4 MB. 

@ Lee D: yes i could

I am not a professional, but is it possible that AD keeps it in some kind of vector pdf and the printercompany does not accept that?

It makes me a bit afraid to use exported files from AD for printing.

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The PDFs I've made from ADesigner have been okay generally. PDF's almost always do contain vectors - that is the whole point of them. When you open a PDF in Photoshop CS6 it will rasterise everything so the file will always be much bigger. I'm not sure why you'd want to do that. I can't imagine any printing company not accepting PDF files with vectors in. You really should talk to them.


Windows 7 Pro, I5 3.3G PC 16G RAM

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A PDF with any length of 576 cm (226.77 in) will open at 200" in length. As mentioned, it is a limitation of the PDF spec. It can be done (I've done 400+ inch PDFs) but some RIPs cannot deal with them.

Do the design at 50% scale. Instruct the print establishment to double the size at print.

If there are any bitmaps or bitmap effects, make sure that when you produce the PDF that the DPI of the PDF export (and/or document) is double the DPI that this print establishment wants. So for such large format work, I rarely use bitmap effects (like drop shadows, etc.) above 150 dpi at the final output size. Which, in this case, if you do a version at 50% of the intended print size, the document should be 300 dpi.

Mike


My computer is a nothing-special Toshiba laptop with unremarkable specs running Windows 10 64-bit.

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2 minutes ago, jschor said:

Ok, thanks guys, i think it's best to contact my printer company on this to make sure.

The above is always the correct thing to do...

While you are at it, confirm the output/design size. Reason? If they are using grommets or a sewn loop (like for rope) then the dimensions may change to accommodate that. This extra amount I usually use the bleed for so my design surface is the dimensions the client expects.


My computer is a nothing-special Toshiba laptop with unremarkable specs running Windows 10 64-bit.

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