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 I feel I ought to apologise because I know that some will think this pedantic nonsense, but there is no escaping a simple reality - DPI is not the same as PPI, and it does not belong in any dialogue box.  The world is awash with confusion over this.  Designers, publishers, photo editing, ALL need to know PPI.  The only people that need to use DPI are the print shops and printing presses.  DPI has no place in any software in Affinity, or anywhere in the desktop publishing office or suite.  I await thine fury!..............(but I can prove it if you so must)

 

PS, the dialogue box should really range from about 90 then 180 then 260 300 360 and stop there.  360 being the absolute maximum.  No quality improvement is available or visible after 360.


Microsoft - Like entering your home and opening the stainless steel kitchen door, with a Popup: 'Do you really want to open this door'? Then looking for the dishwasher and finding it stored in the living room where you have to download a water supply from the app store, then you have to buy microsoft compliant soap, remove the carpet only to be told that it is glued to the floor.. Don't forget to make multiple copies of your front door key and post them to all who demand access to all the doors inside your home including the windows and outside shed.

Apple - Like entering your home and opening the oak framed Kitchen door and finding the dishwasher right in front you ready to be switched on, soap supplied, and water that comes through a water softener.  Ah the front door key is yours and it only needs to open the front door.

 

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Oh dear oh dear oh dear, the article is erroneous on so many points.  The designer has absolutely NO control over DPI, this is the domain of the Printer only, we have no control,  a printer printing your photo or design at 600 DPI can have  the same quality as if the printer would print it at 4800 DPI.  We work in pixels not in dots, even home printers have different DPI but that is no concern nor does it matter, 400 DPI is redundant at the point of final design, since the printer can print that at 4800 DPI. The article has confused DPI with PPI.  And I have seen this a few times.  Colour management professionals will never subscribe to the DPI conundrum because DPI has nothing to do with what is sent to a printer.  Your print at 300 PPI, which is encoded within the software as PPI NOT DPI, is then translated and printed at a DPI resolution, 600 DPI can produce exactly the same quality image or design as a 4800 DPI Print in many cases dependent upon the quality of the work.   Besides if one must insist on using DPI nstead of PPI then 400 is pointless since 360 is the absolute maximum in todays technology.  Having anymore than 360 PPI (or DPI if you wish to call it that) does not produce any improvement in visual quality at all.

Respectfully yours

Chris


Microsoft - Like entering your home and opening the stainless steel kitchen door, with a Popup: 'Do you really want to open this door'? Then looking for the dishwasher and finding it stored in the living room where you have to download a water supply from the app store, then you have to buy microsoft compliant soap, remove the carpet only to be told that it is glued to the floor.. Don't forget to make multiple copies of your front door key and post them to all who demand access to all the doors inside your home including the windows and outside shed.

Apple - Like entering your home and opening the oak framed Kitchen door and finding the dishwasher right in front you ready to be switched on, soap supplied, and water that comes through a water softener.  Ah the front door key is yours and it only needs to open the front door.

 

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I have checked the Affinity guidlines and it appears that I am allowed to post a link, it is a completely independent link and serves only to educate, think it might be extremely useful to some people I hope it helps people reading this to understand the mis-use of this terminology.

https://99designs.ie/blog/tips/ppi-vs-dpi-whats-the-difference/

It is a pity really, photoshop users and serious photographers would never use DPI to replace the concept PPI.  It is important to segregate the two concepts, they are simply not interchangeable and their misuse is what causes the confusion ironically.  Anyway I hope this article helps.


Microsoft - Like entering your home and opening the stainless steel kitchen door, with a Popup: 'Do you really want to open this door'? Then looking for the dishwasher and finding it stored in the living room where you have to download a water supply from the app store, then you have to buy microsoft compliant soap, remove the carpet only to be told that it is glued to the floor.. Don't forget to make multiple copies of your front door key and post them to all who demand access to all the doors inside your home including the windows and outside shed.

Apple - Like entering your home and opening the oak framed Kitchen door and finding the dishwasher right in front you ready to be switched on, soap supplied, and water that comes through a water softener.  Ah the front door key is yours and it only needs to open the front door.

 

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Here is 4 pixels per inch compared to 4 dots per inch.slice1.png.2105034b1c232f606daa8032bfc0109d.png

Pixels are the entire area and a shade of grey. Dots vary in size and are solid Black. We are talking about apples and similar apples here. Any printer will tell you he would rather have a 400 PPI image to downsample to 300 or 240 or 85 DPI for printing (because customers complain about the product when they supply 85 PPI images to be printed at 85 DPI). 


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400 PPI image has NO improvement over a 360 PPI image at all.  So telling the customer to downsize in itself demonstrates that the printer himself has no understanding of PPI at  ll and he thinks also that it is the same, shame on him.

 

And this is eactly where the confusion lies, a customer should never ever send anything to a printer at 85 (whatever DPI or PPI), and this is because the customer has no understanding of PPI or DPI, he thinks that dpi is the same as ppi, an image at 180 PPI will print well at 85 DPI depending on its end use.  People have to understand this difference if they do not want to be dissappointed with their printer, and any knowledgeable printer will never tell you to supply an image at DPI settings because DPI had absolutely nothing to do with your design work at all ever.  A customer can send any image at a resolution of say 240PPI and he will not generally ever know (unless he asks specifically) at what resolution the Printer firm will print at, 600,1800,2400,4800 it matters not to the designer in most cases unless he is an advertising firm or a newspaprer or magazine publisher or a billboard along the motorway.  

DPI   PPI   are TWO completely different concepts and a lot of people need to understand what is going on here.  Desktop publishers have nothing to do with DPI, I can not make this clearer.  Keeping them as the same principle or concept is where the confusion and dissappointments lay.


Microsoft - Like entering your home and opening the stainless steel kitchen door, with a Popup: 'Do you really want to open this door'? Then looking for the dishwasher and finding it stored in the living room where you have to download a water supply from the app store, then you have to buy microsoft compliant soap, remove the carpet only to be told that it is glued to the floor.. Don't forget to make multiple copies of your front door key and post them to all who demand access to all the doors inside your home including the windows and outside shed.

Apple - Like entering your home and opening the oak framed Kitchen door and finding the dishwasher right in front you ready to be switched on, soap supplied, and water that comes through a water softener.  Ah the front door key is yours and it only needs to open the front door.

 

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Hi Chris26,
As said this subject was already discussed in several threads. Take a look at these two for reference please:
It's PPI not DPI
PPI is not DPI

Serif has opted for keeping it as DPI. There's no point in going through this discussion again. We appreciate the feedback and references/links posted but if there was plans to revert this the dev team would probably have done it by now.

 

 

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Ok, understand MEB, thanks.  Then maybe ''View''  ''Zoom'' drop down menu where it says pixel view, should be changed to Dot view?  Not that I am suggesting anything other than being respectfully sarcastic.  I wish you and you colleagues great success though in a so far wonderful programme as I painfully but happily wean my tootsies away from adobe creative suite.


Microsoft - Like entering your home and opening the stainless steel kitchen door, with a Popup: 'Do you really want to open this door'? Then looking for the dishwasher and finding it stored in the living room where you have to download a water supply from the app store, then you have to buy microsoft compliant soap, remove the carpet only to be told that it is glued to the floor.. Don't forget to make multiple copies of your front door key and post them to all who demand access to all the doors inside your home including the windows and outside shed.

Apple - Like entering your home and opening the oak framed Kitchen door and finding the dishwasher right in front you ready to be switched on, soap supplied, and water that comes through a water softener.  Ah the front door key is yours and it only needs to open the front door.

 

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An interesting thread. I think I get the distinction between PPI and DPI.

Am I correct in concluding  then that DPI is a print setting that my printer hardware or print service will control, and my image's PPI size will simply determine how large the image will display on my screen? 

In Resize/Resample Settings the control 'labeled'  DPI will in fact determine the PPI of my image and not the DPI resolution of the final print?  I don't really mind what the control is labelled as long as I know what it changes. 

The Help file description is a little confusing in that it states to use 300 DPI for professional printing. Wouldn't the printer used determine print quality? Mine is 600DPI. Or does it mean I should set the DPI control to 300 (300 PPI) for exporting Documents for use by professional printers. Or does it mean something else altogether...

Yikes maybe I don't get the distinction at all ... :$


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2 hours ago, DM1 said:

Am I correct in concluding  then that DPI is a print setting that my printer hardware or print service will control, and my image's PPI size will simply determine how large the image will display on my screen? 

Yes, you have no control or say in the matter when it comes to DPI, this is solely the domain of the printer or print service.  The PPI does determine how large it is on the screen naturally, But, it also determines print quality, depending upon how much detail there is in an image, more detailed images need 240 or better 300 ppi, tonal images can do fine on 180 ppi but more is always better, however ppi dictates and controls how LARGE you can make your image, if the image came in raw at 240 ppi with 2000 x 2000 pixels and the same image came in at 240 ppi with 4000 x 4000 pixels then the latter image could be enlarged much more than the former.  (Maths needed here)

In Resize/Resample Settings the control 'labeled'  DPI will in fact determine the PPI of my image and not the DPI resolution of the final print?  I don't really mind what the control is labelled as long as I know what it changes. 

Yes, just think PPI that's it.

The Help file description is a little confusing in that it states to use 300 DPI for professional printing. Wouldn't the printer used determine print quality? Mine is 600DPI. Or does it mean I should set the DPI control to 300 (300 PPI) for exporting Documents for use by professional printers. Or does it mean something else altogether...

Two people can send their 2000 x 2000 pixel image to a printer at 300 ppi, one goes off to be printed at 2400 dpi, the other at 600 dpi, there will be little difference in quality of the final print in general, a higher dpi setting by the printer simply means that images will be sharper, and possibly more contrast, but this in general is unnoticeable for photographers.  Where it really matters is in big advertising road signs and bill boards and newspapers, dpi is how many dots of ink are squeezed into one pixel, better rather to say one inch, so if you have 300 pixels per inch you get 600 dots of ink in that one inch, as opposed to say 4800 dots or 50 dots.

Yikes maybe I don't get the distinction at all ... :$

That would not be your fault, kind regards, chris

PS, what I should have said is that with 300 PPI you can have 600 or 4800 dots squeezed into one inch, the former will have less dots per pixel, the latter more dots per pixel, but this does not affect quality for photographers, what does affect quality is the PPI, stick to 300 whenever you can and you will never go wrong, 360 is the absolute highest PPi for any photograph, this has been proven (google this one it's all out there for everybody to learn), there is no point in going higher than 360 PPI, but 300 is the perfectly acceptable and produces fine quality, so does 240 but that depends on the aesthetics of your image.

 


Microsoft - Like entering your home and opening the stainless steel kitchen door, with a Popup: 'Do you really want to open this door'? Then looking for the dishwasher and finding it stored in the living room where you have to download a water supply from the app store, then you have to buy microsoft compliant soap, remove the carpet only to be told that it is glued to the floor.. Don't forget to make multiple copies of your front door key and post them to all who demand access to all the doors inside your home including the windows and outside shed.

Apple - Like entering your home and opening the oak framed Kitchen door and finding the dishwasher right in front you ready to be switched on, soap supplied, and water that comes through a water softener.  Ah the front door key is yours and it only needs to open the front door.

 

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