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I've read that there is no plan to develop a Linux version and I wonder why not?

(I've seen that there was a post about this but the question "why?" never got answered. To be clear: I'm not asking for further speculation, I would like the answer to come from someone who actually knows.)

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I would also love to see linux version for those linux platforms which are supported also by BlackMagic Design's DaVinci Resolve because its amazing tool and its user interface reminds a little bit Affinity products (clean and simple and easy to use because of tabs, separated process: Affinity photo: development, Davinci resolve: editing, Affinity photo: photopersona, Davinci resolve: fusion, Affinity Photo: tone mapping, Davinci resolve: color etc. ). I hope they will start co-operation and i also wish that Affinity will bring Linux supported versions for same platforms than Davinci Resolve has (resolve is also supported with mac and win platforms <3) . All this because i love resolve and affinity's user interface i believe most users will agree that these are similar user friendly softwares.  its like too pairs who seems to belong together <3 :)

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The comparison between Affinity and Resolve is pretty far fetched IMO, but that's totally fine as long as it works for You :) . I use Affinity together with Fusion (standalone) without problems, by creating and exporting assets as PNG or EXR, and using them for compositing and animation in Fusion. As long as both companies play nice and adhere to industry standards, I can build my pipeline to my liking.

About Linux ... I wouldn't mind if one day everything just worked, every driver needed was there and stable, and I had all the apps that I need :) without spending night after night browsing forums and hacking the hell out of the shell ;) . Until last time I tried it there was at least one major dealbreaker, maybe nonexistent driver, wonky wacom support, and of course missing pro apps like, well, Affinity.

For the time being I choose like that: which app does the job best? Which OSes does it run on? On which OS does it run best? Which hardware does the OS run on? Which hardware is the best compromise of power, stability and price?

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On 9/11/2018 at 10:14 PM, switzel said:

I've read that there is no plan to develop a Linux version and I wonder why not?

(I've seen that there was a post about this but the question "why?" never got answered. To be clear: I'm not asking for further speculation, I would like the answer to come from someone who actually knows.)

It has been answered by Serif, more than once, by one of the top guys at Serif.

It would cost a lot of money to develop and the returns are unlikely to justify the expense.

Serif staff are also very busy developing and updating their apps for existing customers, so don't have the manpower at the moment.

As I said, its all in the posts about Linux, if you care to look.


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

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40 minutes ago, Rocketdrive said:

For the time being I choose like that: which app does the job best? Which OSes does it run on? On which OS does it run best? Which hardware does the OS run on? Which hardware is the best compromise of power, stability and price?

Very good.:)

I have noticed that Linux users chose the OS and then desperately try to get software to do the job.

Most people with a professional attitude (like you) do the opposite. Choose software that does the job, and ignore the OS.

I have been trying to get that point across for months, but Linux users never seem to listen.

p.s. I might steal your reasoning ;)


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

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I purchased my first personal computer system in 1983 based on the following:

1. What specific needs did I have?

2. What software best addressed those needs in the way I wanted to work?

3.What equipment would function in a comfortable way for me (screen and keyboard in this case— Osborne vs. Kaypro)

4. By this time the operating system had been determined.

In 1983 I chose a Kaypro II system.

 

Over the years I have chosen software and systems based on CP/M, DOS, Windows, Xenix, BSD, Linux, webOS, Android, iOS, and macOS. The OS is the last consideration when addressing getting the work out.

 

For curiosity, the order is different—I may even start with choosing an OS to try, but I won't expect it to meet my work needs.

 

Just a point of view from an old guy who started with computers in the mid 1960's with FORTRAN IV on a GE-215 computer. ;-)

 

 


Solly

JFSJ

N3MKH

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