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jksmollin

Markdown File Compatibility

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This is a feature I would love. Markdown is terrific for writing quickly and easily and it would be great if Publisher directly imported them with all the tags getting translated to basic styles or something.

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Same, I am already using pandoc to convert my markdown files to docx, epub, and pdf for digital publishing.  To be able to pull my markdown into a publisher file and have it auto apply my body, heading, bullet, numbered, emphasis, and strong styles to the text would be amazing.  Especially if it was able to generate and fill tables from markdown and insert the linked pictures.

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My workflow for large documents will be to create in Markdown and then import/link the text into Publisher. Big +1 for this feature for me.

Just like others in this thread, I would love it to convert styles into body, heading, bullet, emphasis, strong, quote and tables. Linked pictures are less important for me because I tend to be just using the markdown for copy.

Thanks Affinity!

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This would be a huge boost. Publisher is not a writing environment. As it stands, there does not seem to be a way to get even such simple stuff and emphasis into Publisher from an external source. Can't paste rich text, HTML, nor Markdown.

Markdown seems the obvious choice because it is intended for writing and it is surging in popularity. There will be some choices to be made over variants of Markdown but many software vendors have made their decisions and got on with it.

I'd settle for just headings, emphasis, lists, and links for starters.

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10 hours ago, zkarj said:

Can't paste rich text, HTML, nor Markdown.

Pasting rich text (or .docx), or importing via File > Place, should work. If you're having trouble with that, you might want to post a separate topic in the Questions section.


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10 hours ago, walt.farrell said:

Pasting rich text (or .docx), or importing via File > Place, should work. If you're having trouble with that, you might want to post a separate topic in the Questions section.

Goodness knows what I did before because I swear it didn't work when I tried it. But clearly it does now. Thanks.

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Import/Export of Markdown would be very useful because it does not transport any formatting information as RTF, doc(x), … does. It contains only hierarchical  information (plus some general format instructions like bold, italics,…). A plain HTML file (without styles, css) does this, too, but in compare to Markdown it is much more complicated.

In this case it is up to the user which editor she/he/it likes to use for huge text if editing within frames is not that comfortable.

If there would be an assignment to formating (example: "> > >" for three times comment indent could be a format for box, green) it could be a very stable method of text interchange – which would be helpful in multi-output scenarios (PDF, HTML, EPUB, …), too.

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11 hours ago, NoSi said:

plus some general format instructions like bold, italics

Strictly speaking, all of Markdown is "structural" although I would use the word semantic. Markdown (as per the original Gruber spec) does not offer italic and bold but rather emphasis and strong emphasis. The "block" and "span" features of Markdown should be directly applicable to Paragraph and Character styles respectively.

I believe when you start trying to address actual formatting (like colour choice, borders, backgrounds) then it gets very messy very quickly. Markdown writing environments are generally geared to semantic writing only, and so they should be. It's the modern equivalent of the old adage applied in the days when Word ruled the roost: write your content before you format it.

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9 hours ago, zkarj said:

it gets very messy very quickly.

I personally never ever have written a text formatted afterwards. I always come down from a structure (headlines) into detail. Because of that I never have the need of a single format in a single place of a document – I always define a format for a semantic/structural highlighting with multiple occurrences of a type of information. This ist perfectly supported by Markdown, that leaves it to the writer, how a "##" paragraph or *emphasis* and combinations of it will look like printed or on a web page: it depends on the format connected with it.

If »it gets very messy very quickly« this points to a unreflected content and/or structure of a text. I do not believe that this can be improved only by subsequential formatting.

Markdown offers a strict focus to structure instead of appearance. "Form follows function" is a very successful principle.

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I think we're saying the same thing @NoSi. Your mention of bold, italic, green colour, and boxes made me think you were advocating a markup to annotate these. We're passing each other on the terms we use to describe these things. I like the term "semantic markup," which I learned many years ago in the context of HTML, because it conveys that the markup reflects meaning and not presentation. Depending on what type of content is being created, I can see that some presentation decisions may be made that do not reflect meaning but design. For instance a creator might choose to set different background colours to a series of block quotes and these differences serve only to alter the design, not the fact that the quotes differ in some way.

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