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A tricky definition:

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(Thus, they are called "macros" because a "big" block of code can be expanded from a "small" sequence of characters.)

cmd c  😉

In my usage a "macro" is an individual extension of the interface which combines several interface commands, at least two. Since "cmd c" is just 1 command and already exists in the interface I wouldn't call it "macro". Otherwise every existing function or command in an app could be called a "macro", regardless how it gets triggered.

Also, a macro doesn't have to get "written" as text based code but often gets created by recording mouse movements, entirely without any key pressed (without a sequence of characters). So even "copy" could get recorded or written as macro, regardless of its usability. But still I wouldn't call it a macro because it's just 1 command.

macOS 10.14.6, MacBookPro Retina 15" + Eizo 27"

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1 hour ago, PÅ¡enda said:

Thanks for the explanation - in my many years of experience using many types of applications (from office applications, graphic tools to technical drawing AutoCAD and OrCAD, + programming) I have not come across any other meaning of the term Macro than is given here:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macro_(computer_science)

Like I said, leave it to musicians to shatter and break any technical law, rule or definition of a word and use it in another way ! hahah Oh man, years ago when the term "Stem" was starting to get used to describe individual tracks (hi hat, snare, kick, bass, keys, guitar) being tracked out individually, there was a total total uproar. Because IMO its being used in reverse. A "stem" branches off into leaves, so the stem should be all the tracks recorded into one track, and the individual tracks should be called "Leaves". BUT since that sounds lame (send me the leaves bro !), everyone just continues to use the term "Stem" ("Send me the stems bro so I can mix it down better") to describe that even though at this point we all realize its wrong.

With Macro's though, IDK man, the definition you sent does lead to several possible technically correct definitions IF you let your mind get creative. "a rule or pattern that specifies how a certain input should be mapped to a replacement output". So lets use a example of Copying something. -  The *output* is "copy", and the usual *input* done by going to edit, drop down menu and choosing "copy". This is usual input coupled with its usual output. But there is a *rule* written with-in the software that if you press Command+C (which are just keys, so they have different *outputs* by themselves) that action gets *mapped* to a replacement *output* called "copy". So yea, IDK, IMO by definition anytime you stroke a combination keys and that action does a output that is otherwise done another way manually, then IMO that qualifies as a "Macro". No ?

1 hour ago, thomaso said:

A tricky definition:

cmd c  😉

In my usage a "macro" is an individual extension of the interface which combines several interface commands, at least two. Since "cmd c" is just 1 command and already exists in the interface I wouldn't call it "macro". Otherwise every existing function or command in an app could be called a "macro", regardless how it gets triggered.

Also, a macro doesn't have to get "written" as text based code but often gets created by recording mouse movements, entirely without any key pressed (without a sequence of characters). So even "copy" could get recorded or written as macro, regardless of its usability. But still I wouldn't call it a macro because it's just 1 command.

But the term of "certain input" and "mapping to a replacement output" doesn't necessarily say it needs to be large or a sequence per se. From my understanding anytime you use a key to trigger something that otherwise is done via a menu or GUI button, that technically could be considered a Macro, because the output/outcome has been mapped to respond to said input. If you read on, it even says "Character Macros" are a correct term. Also says: "may be a sequence" - key words, *may be*, meaning, doesn't has to always be. 

IDK - then there is this unprofessional/unofficial explanation of the differences:

https://wikidiff.com/shortcut/macro

By wider, more creative definition though, I think the above link could be wrong. We have evolved into using badass to mean something good. Cool to mean awesome, etc.. so yea, a Macro can easily be a replacement definition to shortcut IMO. Doesn't seem too far fetched.

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46 minutes ago, InfaRed said:

then IMO that qualifies as a "Macro". No ?

For me No 🙂
The difference between a simple command that can be executed by clicking on a menu item or pressing a keyboard shortcut, and a macro is that, unlike a simple command, the function of which can itself be complex and complicated (see Erase White Paper, Frequency Separation, etc.) a macro will allow a "sequence" of these commands to be executed. So "Ctrl+C" = Keyboard shortcut, and "Ctrl+C and next Ctrl+V in one action" = Macro.
You can freely use any nomenclature, but I think it would be good, especially when communicating on a specific forum about an application, to use the meaning defined by this application, see https://affinity.help/photo/English.lproj/pages/Macros_Batch/macros.html. Otherwise, users will not understand you (or you them), and there will be confusion.

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2 hours ago, PÅ¡enda said:

For me No 🙂

ha ! Understood.

 

2 hours ago, PÅ¡enda said:

You can freely use any nomenclature, but I think it would be good, especially when communicating on a specific forum about an application, to use the meaning defined by this application, see https://affinity.help/photo/English.lproj/pages/Macros_Batch/macros.html. Otherwise, users will not understand you (or you them), and there will be confusion.

I agree and I definitely don't want to confuse anyone. On a side tangent though, I just still say in this particular case, the definition of Macro as a whole is much broader than many people are thinking (apparently). In the link provided above, all that really is, is Affinity designers naming that feature a "Macro Panel" (which all that is really is a auto script writing recorder and playback). It does not mean that is exactly to a tee the only true definition of Macro as a useable word even within Affinity as a whole. (IMO). "A single computer instruction that stands for a sequence of operations" - Dude, thats pretty broad. You got to admit.

But you are right, at the end of the day its about communication. And if no one gets my vernacular in this pool, then.. haha yea, I have to adapt. Point taken good sir !

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