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8 minutes ago, Redsandro said:

False. Node.js developers were the most sought after backend developers in 2019. It is a huge success story.

Sure, JavaScript is growing. But not Linux.

9 minutes ago, Redsandro said:

It's starting to rival Windows.

lol, déjà vu :D

10 minutes ago, Redsandro said:

False. Ask Red Hat Enterprise Linux what they and their billions of revenue think about free software.

I understand your frustration but please don't spread misinformation.

Man, I am talking only about Linux on desktop. Linux enthusiasts don't like closed software like Affinity. They like to make thousands of different distributions, which all are the same but not compatible to each other. Wine works also against Linux. All that prevents Linux to grow on the desktop.

You need 2 steps to grow Linux:

1) Focus on only 1 or 2 distributions; with one standard

2) Support software companies to bring their professional software native to Linux.

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59 minutes ago, j0e.org said:

Man, I am talking only about Linux on desktop.

Okay. You were being ambiguous then. You seemed to talk about the Linux Foundation and how they should do something contrary to their mission. Also, the Linux Foundation doesn't really care about desktop.

59 minutes ago, j0e.org said:

Linux enthusiasts don't like closed software like Affinity.

False. Look at this topic. Look at pay what you want bundles. Linux users pay the most.

59 minutes ago, j0e.org said:

Wine works also against Linux. All that prevents Linux to grow on the desktop.

Wine argues differently:

Quote

For most people there remain a handful of programs locking them in to Windows. [There] are tens of thousands of games and internal corporate applications which will never be ported [to Linux].

If you want to use Linux and rely on any legacy Windows application, something like Wine is essential. Wine makes Linux more useful and allows for millions of users to switch who couldn't otherwise. This greatly raises Linux market share, drawing more commercial and community developers to Linux.

 

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5 minutes ago, Redsandro said:

False. Look at this topic. Look at pay what you want bundles. Linux users pay the most.

That's not Linux enthusiasts. Most of them refuse to use closed source.

 

6 minutes ago, Redsandro said:

Wine argues differently:

That's the wrong way. History proves that it is not working. All that is working around the real problem, without success.

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Well @Redsandro thanks for dispelling the myths and disinformation – you seem to be very knowledgeable and well informed; just what is needed on this thread. 👍

Has anyone thought to follow the money – What if our beloved ever so easy to use Serif products were available to use on gnulinux, mint, ubuntu, redHat or even FreeBSD, at their well priced place in the market; hundreds or thousands of licences for the Affinity Linux version sold??? Linux uptake accelerates! Advertising and personal data mining revenues plummet! Now who would that upset?

My email provider tiscali is stopping its free service so have signed up with a free EU provider – apparently this is getting your email stopped or sent to spam automatically – someone mainstream is getting very upset. There are many vested interests being played out here too. We want to buy from Serif yet Serif do not want to supply and seem to be quite hostile or unwilling to support even winehq. The marketplace isn’t supposed to work like that (it does) - I was only too happy to buy Serif Publishing Power-Suite to get away from Msoft, way back in Win3.1 days and pay for updates along the way until they no longer supported XP or Vista and would love to buy current Affinity products. I just hate Win10 and all intrusive software – it’s that simple.

Just think what the Android fork or alternative degoogled smartphone will do – don’t panic – it isn’t happening yet! Yes I’m about to buy this phone in its development stage to get away from intrusive google and global Inc. I also use Tails 4.3 packing Tor browser live in RAM. It’s not about the money – I want to buy from Serif.

Thanks to all who are working to solve this under wine. Hope it does not turn out like the Ffox derivatives with snooping – sorry, security issues.

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Wow there is a lot of extremely silly bickering in this thread, a lot of poorly formed opinions, on both sides.

Modern Linux is just as capable as other more proprietary systems, but it lacks in market share by most known metrics.

 

I am a Linux user, I pay for software that supports me, in both my professional and personal endeavours  I donate to open projects. I would gladly pay for a copy of any of affinity's products, should it be ported. If not I'll find a way to do what I need on the system that suits me best. I do me, you do you

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Okay @sciencephysicist we get the inference. May I suggest you take a look at recent anti trust – abuse of power fines and for a more in depth analysis befitting your title; please visit: (a little out of date 2018) https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2018/07/googles-iron-grip-on-android-controlling-open-source-by-any-means-necessary/

This iron grip to which they refer has been effective for many years now and though “small” billion dollar anti-trust and other naughty stuff fines may grab your attention from time to time you move on, as they say, and the relevance fades into obscurity just as they intended. As with our free media, an open joke that continues to fool, no laws or fines are required as self policing works far more effectively – don’t step out of line or else – everyone maintains the status-quo – we all know the unwritten rules. This has allowed Tech Giants or Global Inc to become so powerful and influence governments who just like y’all are now so reliant on them. :51_scream: Excuse me while I jump ship!

Now with our beloved software only available through Global Inc App Stores………...silly me won’t be expecting a Linux version any time soon!

Linux has viable and likeable apps for webrowser, email, letter writing etc covered. Shotwell photo organiser will do most things and Gimp is okay but not in same class as Affinity Photo as can be deduced from so many posts here. I think Affinity products would help Linux and BSD distros market share a little – their software being the missing link (or item) for a lot of people.

What is more worrying than self policing and as far as I am aware no name for it has yet been coined: Apparently developers who base their Linux web browser variant on Ffox devise code to inhibit data miners from Global Inc and other snoopers – Ffox then with their next release have modified code to nullify anti-mining and hand back snooping rights to Global Inc. :35_thinking:

When the clever dedicated people eventually get Affinity software to perform via wine will Affinity with their next update scupper the advancement and all future wine advancements in similar manner? There will be no shortage of time expenditure or finance for that!

Quote:- I do me, you do you ??? Then why are you here ??? :76_ghost:

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Personally, I think the $500,000 investment would more than pay for itself in 3 years (rough guess) but Affinity landing on the Linux platform now that top level Professional creative applications such as DaVinci Resolve are available at affordable price points, there is a desperate desire to replace the SVG/raster utilities like Inkscape, and Gimp with professional grade tools worthy of creative professionals in more areas of expertise besides animation and filmmaking. I truly believe that Affinity could be a creative services tipping point for Linux as a viable OS for more creative professionals. The fact that the initial investment is estimated at less than $1M puts Affinity in a unique position to change the landscape. Adobe couldn't afford to follow Affinity, until they get to the point where they cannot afford not to. The reason so many Linux users want it in my opinion is because Affinity could truly be a game changer for the platform. Professional grade 2-D art and design applications are the only gap left for creative professionals to make the switch.

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The 500k was just a random number (kind of an example in an informal conversation, not the result of a study. As I understood it! ) thrown into the discussion, back in the day. I don't believe that's enough for creating the suite in Linux. Not even for one of  the three apps. That's about 5 or 6 yearly salaries (As an example, average python salary on US 2020, according to some sources, 100 -120k, but this is quite specialized, is not just mastering a language what is needed), so for one single year (and IMO, a port of the apps would take definitely more) for the kind of experienced (and specialized) programmers needed for the task. Let alone the lots of extra costs around it all (and marketing, etc), by far is not just the salaries, equipment, licenses and etc, is quite more. Maybe due to the company's size and high efficiency the costs would be way lower than if was Adobe or the like, but still, any raw estimation clearly leaves that number super small, in my personal opinion. In the open source world that number is absolutely fantastic, and I know that the Gimp team (or even the super organized, evolved, and well funded Blender) would do wonders with that kind of money. But the volunteer factor for open source coding is a big factor in them being kindda OK-ish with earning way less than the current average salary in high end development.

Still... One thing is that the company could, despite that, go for it by taking quite a big risk (out of its own pocket). And maybe it could end well (or not, in money terms), so, more of a matter of some big investor, the kind of individuals or entities that indeed have that kind of money, the habit and the information to play with  those risks, and sharp eye to pick companies or products to fund. But the company making the software could be putting in risk salaries and the survival of the company as a whole.  All this to say  that my very personal opinion (and there are so many chances of me being completely wrong in this....) is that for going this route, some very solid investor would have to show up with the real funds needed. And why I've said before that it'd be super nice if that proposition would come from an already big Linux/open source based company, as we know there are now quite a few of certain size (Red Hat, Elastic, MongoDB...these all have a company value in the billions (and I thought Canonical, but that one seems has quite smaller revenue and $ value..)...but even then, Adobe's revenue is quite higher than Red Hat's, for example (like many times more)). I worked for many years at a software developer, and there were quite some offers of investors and boards, but the main issue for taking the money was that typically such investors would require intervening too much in the decision making, and even how the product is managed and produced. In general, for someone with own's business, that's not something to love, but depends on each situation. They took indeed funds of investors that let them more loose, through all those years, and indeed, the company was finally fully acquired by a hefty sum and other matters. But even being a less relevant company to the world (quite less) than Serif, it took a tad of money to convince the bosses (many millions), to change direction. And even more, for being acquired. But I (I mean, we) don't know much about the numbers needed, neither of the obstacles, even less about which are their (not some programmer's desire, but the company's owners' ) inclinations to take one path or another.


Affinity Designer, Affinity Photo and Affinity Publisher licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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On 3/17/2020 at 11:57 PM, Andy2 said:

 

Okay @sciencephysicist we get the inference. May I suggest you take a look at recent anti trust – abuse of power fines and for a more in depth analysis befitting your title; please visit: (a little out of date 2018) https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2018/07/googles-iron-grip-on-android-controlling-open-source-by-any-means-necessary/

...words...

Quote:- I do me, you do you ??? Then why are you here ??? :76_ghost:

It's all very pie in the sky tho isn't it? Affinity aren't going to be swayed by talks of anti-trusts. Its a numbers game for them. Having these conversations is great, and I agree that the proprietary systems are terrible in these regards. But this isnt the venue for this, note that you'd love to have affinity on linux and move on. Maybe come back periodically and express that you're still interested.

Donate to the open projects, maybe buy Davinci Resolve or Nuke if you're able. Vote with your wallet.

You're on Windows and Mac turf here and being the preacher on the street corner is not going to sway anyone, not Affinity or their existing users.

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On 3/22/2020 at 6:38 PM, sciencephysicist said:

It's all very pie in the sky tho isn't it?

It IS an unrealistic dream, but if nobody pursued unrealistic dreams...(well then we wouldn't have Affinity Photo).   Dreams can become reality - a quick survey of history reveals that such events quite often involve persistence and very squeaky wheels.

I do, however, completely agree that we can (right now) vote with out wallets and support open source products.  In fact, my inclination is that this should probably be our first priority.    However,  they do still have a way to go and I do think that a large commercial product will give Linux an enormous boost in converting market share, and so, is a fight worth pursuing.  

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1 minute ago, Dradis said:

It IS an unrealistic dream (trust us, we know), but if nobody pursued unrealistic dreams...(well then we wouldn't have Affinity Photo).   Dreams can become reality - a quick survey of history reveals that such events usually involve persistence and very squeaky wheels.

Survivorship bias on display here.


MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid 2012) Mac OS 10.12.6 || Mac Pro (Late 2013) Mac OS 10.14.5

Affinity Designer 1.8.3 | Affinity Photo 1.8.3 | Affinity Publisher 1.8.3 | Affinity Designer Beta 1.8.3.2 | Affinity Photo Beta 1.8.3.180 | Affinity Publisher Beta 1.8.3.651

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1 hour ago, Old Bruce said:

Survivorship bias on display here.

My point isn't that dreams and risk always pan out (or even that they pan out most of the time),  but, rather,  that risk is generally an essential ingredient for CHANGE and we, the Design/Linux community are in the unenviable position of trying to find somebody to take a risk on us.   That requires speaking up (and speaking up always tends to annoy people... so be it  ...especially in this context - it is, after all, just an online forum - not the front yard of somebody's home).

I have to apologize to sciencephysicist, who is making sound points (that I mostly agree with - and I don't think he/she is even saying that people shouldn't speak up here - and that was the point I instinctively felt inclined to push back against).  I have my own chips on my shoulder that sometimes get the better of me.  I personally think that this forum is a perfectly suitable place for folks to make their case (and occasionally duke it out), and so I wanted to throw my support behind those who continue to join/argue/contribute to the discussion (even if they don't always get along).

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The real risky, romantic,valiant thing to do by the Linux graphic creation community would be to go ahead and use the actual open source tools: Inkscape, Gimp,  Scribus (even if not making anything publishing related, as inkscape can only deal internally with RGB, so, that or using LittleCMS or similar color management system is  the only way on Linux and Inskcape), LittleCMS, Blender, Krita (plus some new kids on the block). But that's the heroic, brave path indeed,that almost no one is willing to take (the original Linux users' rugged stamina is a bit not like it used to be. A lot of the new ones want it too easy). I went there part due to own needs (looking at the companies not willing to spend money on graphic software...now am happy they didn't, as could learn all that), but a big part as I believed in those tools (still do, increasingly, as they're now getting way better). I have faith in them. And I know that pushing a bit I'd have convinced the several bosses to buy enough mid cost software to cover all needs, at least. And I realized how useful those (OS apps) can be, with the most expensive and rare ingredient in the planet (patience). 


Affinity Designer, Affinity Photo and Affinity Publisher licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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I'd like to add, though, to be clear.... From a practical POV for an artist who feels that making art, design (or even image editing for non artistic purposes, ie, not for photography, design or illustration) is way more important than the OS choice, then there's absolutely no doubt for me that the practical thing to do is to pick Windows or Mac OS, and just use Affinity, as despite open source graphic software becoming quite better  than ever, Affinity is eons ahead.


Affinity Designer, Affinity Photo and Affinity Publisher licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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@SrPxI totally agree to a point, however for a comb-shaped creator like me, I would like to do my web development, and my design/creative work on the same OS and hardware, and I do, but my hardware options are limited and expensive. If I didn't do web development, I would easily choose windows at this point in my career. Problem solved. However I do develop for the web, and the hoops one has to jump through to develop even the simplest of modern apps on Windows are many and brutal, and not worth the headaches IMO. MS is trying to improve it, but if companies like Serif were to take the risk of adopting Linux, it could potentially beat MS to web development (and creative OS) nirvana, so to your point I work on the weak and costly Apple hardware. I would prefer to have great hardware and a thin OS that does everything I do... Apple is overpriced and underpowered, and Windows is crap for the web... so I'm left either owning two machines and a KVM, or paying at least 2x for outdated hardware for the foreseeable future. 

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I used to develop for the web (not back-end, tho), too... At certain places, with all the environment and colleagues using Linux, I'd use Windows... And that meant me providing with all seamless integration with them, as it was me the one picking a different OS. Just like when I did choose Blender or Wings 3D instead of 3DS Max (but I have handled Max with zero probs, I indeed love it..I just prefer now the others) , I'd be the one ensuring the workflow for them was seamless and free of even minor issues. In the web dev ones (providing myself at almost every company all of the html, css, graphics, and ofc the concept design) , and as I would usually take care of web design and design for print (plus SEO, video editing, etc...) I'd need CMYK and advanced color profiles management workflows, pantones, etc... back then, non possible on Linux, so I needed at least handling a Windows or Mac machine (and I avoid macs for the reasons you mentioned, couldn't agree more). So, part of the needed workflows were often me searching the Linux (samba, etc) and Windows tools to make it for them as smooth as if I were 100% on Linux. Even when doing it so for me it was quite harder. I ended up, in most of the instances... using both OSes (sometimes multibooting in same machine, sometimes with VMs in many ways, most of the times just connecting from windows to all Linux servers, handling stuff from there) to the maximum extent I could. Using Putty, WinSCP on the Windows side, plus every port I could find for windows of every linux tool (not many, back then...) to connect all well, besides virtual machines, remote desktop control tools, and when I had to stay on a Linux machine, every linux graphic app I could grab, and created my very cross platform workflows. Today it would have been pretty easier, as open source software on linux for graphics is much (WAY, indeed...) better. And also the tools to work in that mixed universe of Windows and Linux, have also evolved.

Web development can be done from any machine and OS (as I say, I used to do all web code and design from Windows, but I agree, is way more direct if staying solely on Linux) , one way or the other, but I completely see your point, though, of desiring to have it all on Linux. Is very doable to develop from Windows (IMO. I can agree to disagree), but for sure for many web workflows is not optimal, although you can remote connect in many ways and smooth that part.


Affinity Designer, Affinity Photo and Affinity Publisher licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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The thing here is that it really does not affect the situation ... The factors (as I mentioned in a recent post) are quite bigger in every way (numbers, money) no matter whatever we expose here as reasons (or even less the convenience of each one's situation) for one take or the other. Meaning, it cannot have practical effect .


Affinity Designer, Affinity Photo and Affinity Publisher licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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Yes I get it that if you are an employee or freelance professional your current best option is to use Affinity with available OS’s. This is stating the obvious and does not add much to the discussion here and as I said before “silly me won’t be expecting a Linux version any time soon!”

As to the Why? Unless I missed it in this thread – did anyone suggest why the following software apps were ready, willing, able and do offer their products cross platform including Linux? Blackmagic Davinci Resolve, OpenShot Video Editor, Shotcut, Lightworks, Kdenlive & Blender yet there are no end of reasons given on this thread as to why under the same circumstance Affinity cannot – self policing – see above! There are of course many cross platform apps that I could have quoted but thought the above were more relevant being graphical creative packages.

This is why I hope and dream that one day soon the clever people on this thread will develop a “wine” workaround for Affinity products that will hopefully not be immediately trashed by the Serif company. When they succeed I shall still keep and use Serif PhotoPlus and PagePlus as they are just so easy to use. I will of course pay Serif for their software rather than use a cracked version.

I have just paid eFoundation for new phone forked Android (linux) system and use Trisquel and ubuntu freely on computers also using wine installed packages. XP-Pro for professional 3D CAD software though. It's just so good not to even have look at Win10 let alone maintain and update it and update that vital AV software which can in itself be spyware! 

Please All – do stay safe and well - and look out for the less fortunate.

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Posted (edited)

My two cents:


I work as a Web Developer. I need dev tools and designer tools to do my job. I would pay and invest the time to learn Affinity products if there were on Linux, in the same way, I did for Figma over all the other similar tools. Just because I know it'd be accessible to me no matter what OS I choose to use. If you are on Linux, you win that market just by being there. 


But if I have to go back to Windows or Mac because the design tools (which I am thinking of doing). Why would I bother with Affinity when I could use Adobe just as I was doing before?

Edited by SomeDev
Grammar

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I can't help but feel the $500K number quoted at the beginning of this thread is arbitrary.  Given all of the support for Linux that Microsoft has built into Visual Studio in the last couple of years, not to mention the availability of a Linux kernel for Windows, I think it very easily could be less.  However, I can understand it would be some effort of time and resources to do the port.  It is a a big risk for Serif to take with not knowing how quickly they might recoup the cost of development and start making a profit.  There is no good metric for them to determine at what pace that would happen.  I would buy the suite for Linux the day it became available if it ever did but how are the supposed to know how many others like me there would be?  I personally very much wish they had the resources to be a pioneering company but it does not sound like they do so we probably should all give them a break and just live with what we have.  The Affinity suite perhaps is not as complete as Adobe CC but it is still excellent software and it costs less.  I also appreciate the thoughtfulness they have as a company for the community.

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I think you are loosing an opportunity of growing by supporting Linux, because adobe is not available for us. And because of that tools like davinci resolve and Blender are gaining momentum in the past years. We are missing awesome tools like yours, please think about it.

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14 hours ago, SomeDev said:

Why would I bother with Affinity when I could use Adobe just as I was doing before?

Because of Affinity being non subscription based, one time fee, extremely cheap (by any way one could measure it), fresh, innovative development, free updates until full integer number versions, etc, etc. I'm on Windows since always and I (like a legion of Mac and Windows users here) still prefer it to Adobe (this does not contradict the fact that Adobe apps have some more features or apps as a suite, etc. Just that I prefer it to Adobe), although I'm always told to use Adobe at a company, and so I do and will do until I hit one using Affinity. But if you prefer Adobe to what Affinity offers, certainly it would not make sense to leave the platform Adobe is in, be it Mac OS or Windows. I give more value to the painting or editing tool than the OS it happens to run on. If not, then the importance and priorities are not being put in the act of creating art or editing, but just in an operating system.   If Adobe was on Linux (just imagine it for a moment... it's a funny thought if you give it a go for 2 minutes to think in the implications and ramifications in the industry), but not on Windows, neither on Mac, it'd happen like I well remember in the early 90s, when I worked at some advertising, design and media agency : The machines needing Photoshop and Freehand, yes or yes, would be Macs (also, and during some years, macs hardware was significantly better... SCSI disks and controllers, the monitors back then, and a large etc). If that was the case now with Linux, the boss at every company would make everyone use Linux as Adobe would only run on Linux. People at companies tend to be mainly very pragmatic.


Affinity Designer, Affinity Photo and Affinity Publisher licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, SrPx said:

Because of Affinity being non subscription based, one time fee, extremely cheap (by any way one could measure it), fresh, innovative development, free updates until full integer number versions, etc, etc. I'm on Windows since always and I (like a legion of Mac and Windows users here) still prefer it to Adobe (this does not contradict the fact that Adobe apps have some more features or apps as a suite, etc. Just that I prefer it to Adobe), although I'm always told to use Adobe at a company, and so I do and will do until I hit one using Affinity. But if you prefer Adobe to what Affinity offers, certainly it would not make sense to leave the platform Adobe is in, be it Mac OS or Windows. I give more value to the painting or editing tool than the OS it happens to run on. If not, then the importance and priorities are not being put in the act of creating art or editing, but just in an operating system.   If Adobe was on Linux (just imagine it for a moment... it's a funny thought if you give it a go for 2 minutes to think in the implications and ramifications in the industry), but not on Windows, neither on Mac, it'd happen like I well remember in the early 90s, when I worked at some advertising, design and media agency : The machines needing Photoshop and Freehand, yes or yes, would be Macs (also, and during some years, macs hardware was significantly better... SCSI disks and controllers, the monitors back then, and a large etc). If that was the case now with Linux, the boss at every company would make everyone use Linux as Adobe would only run on Linux. People at companies tend to be mainly very pragmatic.

 

You are 100% missing the point. An OS is also a tool, Linux can run a myriad of software and work tools better and more relibely than windows. Mac comes tied with overpriced hardware that overheats and breaks early.  I may also have software that doesn't exist outside of linux. The price of the license makes no difference when you put into account that Adobe products have way more features. 

A lot of people do use Linux for work. There is a market for devs, 3D, video, game creation and composition jobs that uses Linux. That's why all those markets have property tools with Linux versions. If Serif gets in that market, it would gain it by default. Vs having to compete on a market were Adobe it's already king and there is not most motivation to switch software.

Edited by SomeDev
Typos

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You are 100% missing the point. An OS is also a tool, Linux can run a mirad of software and work tools better and more relibely than windows

That depends heavily on the field of work.  There is quite a collection of software I can't run on Linux properly (meaning, running native, not emulating, directly to hardware and the devices, etc) , as a graphic designer (for print, web, etc), illustrator and 3D guy just because like the case of Affinity, there are no Linux versions of it. IE, 3DS Max, which is requested for the 100% game studios and architecture related jobs in my area (so...all the 3D jobs in the area, lol). Or Zbrush, etc. And while I don't need Adobe for my freelancing, whenever I got into companies, Adobe is requested.  It is a too long list. So... I'm not missing the point for a number of professional fields I'm in (and some other legions are).

BTW, about stability...there's a lot of myth around that.... in good hands, any Windows is rock solid stable. I'm versed on it, and experience zero probs. I never uninstall or format. I don't have any workflow interruptions neither issues .You need to know your OS, whether is Linux, Windows or Mac OS. And I know the 3 enough as to be pretty sure of this. About performance... Yep, Blender renders faster (I tested it, I don't just rely in what all people say, it's true..altho they're recently patching the thing so in Windows is rendering increasingly faster), but what I loose for one matter, it is compensated by large in so many other ways, by having a ton of tools of my field (mostly graphics) available, color management more developed and industry standard, etc.

Quote

 I may also have software that doesn't exist outside of linux. 

I don't doubt it. But I have not been requested of any of that till date at a company (at 10 companies where I worked at, and a ton more interviews), but even more, I don't have a single need -in all the fields I listed- of an app that is on Linux but not on Windows. Not for a job at a company, neither for my current full time freelancing.

Quote

The price of the license makes no difference when you put into account that Adobe products have way more features. 

It heavily depends on if you need those features for your workflows. Or, if you can (my case and also a bunch other colleagues I know) or can't do those tasks with other apps other than Adobe's . In several cases, those other apps are more efficient in that, due to being more specialized.

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There is a market for devs, 3D, video, game creation

Game creation is one of my strongest fields/profiles... I'm always requested 3DS Max + Unity/Unreal experience (in the art pipeline, not coding, ofc) in every single mid/small sized studio, and Max/ZB  (plus a ton more other matters, skills and expertise) in the largest ones. Not a single offer (in my area, even country) I can recall where they requested Linux OS or Linux-only apps. I've worked almost a decade at a software developer company, heavily Linux based, and focused on web development, web apps and cross platform (that is, working for the 3 systems) native apps. For code related stuff, and the way the company was structured, yep it was handy to work from Linux, but as I mentioned before, never essential. Had worked at other similar Linux centered places, same story. The designer had full freedom and ability to work from a mac or Windows. Indeed, often the bosses preferred it so. As the graphic software part (at pro level) was always a nightmare for everybody, on Linux. Not only the software available. OS level stuff for specific professional matters, the color management; stuff like CMYK, Pantone libraries support, and some other essential matters in print workflows. Not to mention that even today, very high end specialized hardware, you find from time to time several of those counting only on Mac and Windows drivers, even if every consumer grade graphic cards or the like are well covered and all that, but that's not the matter for pro graphic workflows.

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If Serif gets in that market, it would gain it by default.

No doubt it'd make a huge impact on the Linux community. No doubt it'd be great as Linux is a great OS. And no doubt I'd love it.  What I don't see is any raw data that would make anyone convince a board of investors of it being worth the risk as to compensate all the expenses for a small company (other than a "for sure it will" word from anyone), as we've seen many times the global charts of usage of the 3 OSes, and that's what they are mainly considering and looking at. Maybe if the entire current user base (lol, if so you should convince us, not them...) that has paid licenses would express in a poll (and I mean at least a 85% of the total license paying users participating; that alone is hard to get) that they all would buy (but there's a leap of faith to use there.. a lot of ppl say "will do" a thing which they later on never do) a Linux license of the whatever Affinity app Linux port... That might be a (kind off...surely neither enough) stronger argument. But IMO, again not enough to convince the money people, I suspect.

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Vs having to compete on a market were Adobe it's already king and there is not most motivation to switch software.

Indeed, that's where I believe you do miss the point. You seem to not have perceived the avalanche of people complaining (internet wide, and in many pro circles most of us move around) through many years about the Adobe imposed subscription model. I don't have a single doubt that a very huge percentage (if not almost all) of the paying customers here took this path (heck, initially was in many of the marketing slogans!) just to avoid the Adobe subscription-only system. It might not be a thing for you, but it is in every Adobe related blog article comments section, every forum, everywhere. So... yeah, there is a ton of people strongly motivated towards Affinity due to that very reason. Hordes went back to Corel, many (which hadn't till date) sadly started warezing Adobe, looked back to other existing alternatives, and a lot (meaning, Affinity is possibly the major alternative in perception) turned to Affinity when it showed up first with Designer, then with Photo for Mac and Windows.


Affinity Designer, Affinity Photo and Affinity Publisher licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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