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6 hours ago, Patrick Connor said:

Response below (for the thick skinned)

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TL;DR ;)  

 

actually I did

I'm impressed !  :) 


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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9 hours ago, R C-R said:

A bunch of resources still have to be available from somewhere to support things like built-in help systems, font & text management, print & other device drivers, file level metadata, window servers, etc.

Obviously, Linux can be configured to support all of that in some way or another, but think about how much extra work it would take for the developers to make sure Affinity would run smoothly no matter how that OS was configured.

Well said and in respect to your words i would say this: The more serious software comes to Linux is the more devs and others will bring fixes and make the system better.
The only guys who cares and really to make Linux better are the folks behind the terminal, those who consider graphical interface to be an abomination or a nightmare.
Creative peoples are to conquer Linux in it's early hours with revolutionary tools like Affinity suite, look i'm not day dreaming but everything we see on windows started somewhere and finally grew; i just remember someone in this forum shared the very first Ui of inDesign and Adobe illustrator and .... these where just ... beurkish but peoples trusted it, liked it, supported it and finally the baby grew up to become one of the top ruler in today solution.
Question: Can't Serif take a serious place on the sunny side with this great Affinity Suite ? The Jaapie (Mark Shuttleworth) like someone said is the guy who can be of great help if possible.
He long time ago said Ubuntu will beat Windows and he actually was true at the point Ubuntu is the first distro to be installable inside windows because the giant named mirosoft realized this small one was to become a good friend.
Just my 2 cents !


Never be the Same Again !
MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid 2010) - 2.4 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo - 8 GB 1067 MHz DDR3 - VIDIA GeForce 320M 256 MB

MacOS High Sierra 10.13.6  - Affinity Designer + Affinity Photo + Affinity Publisher + Snagit 2019 + Camtasia 2018 + Movavi Video Editor Business 15

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Quote

He long time ago said Ubuntu will beat Windows and he actually was true at the point Ubuntu is the first distro to be installable inside windows because the giant named mirosoft realized this small one was to become a good friend.

Another "hidden" TL;DR from me. Can't keep these short, it seems....

 

I don't fully understand that sentence.... But Ubuntu (or any Linux distro) is some light years away from beating Windows, sadly (I put emphasis on it as a lot of ppl still think I'm against Linux, while it's the opposite) . I mean, in the matter of user base size. And  heck, do they NOW have a chance to beat them to pieces, they're still in time, with how Windows 10 is treating its users, privacy, the win updates, and how complaints and discomfort is growing and propagating pretty fast recently....  What the lecturer from the video warns about, is a very serious threat for the genuine Linux spirit (which is amazing, always has been, but in our specific field, they clearly fail in putting the resources, money(donations) and human brains for what is graphics making apps, despite the heroic efforts of Krita, Blender, Gimp, Scribus, Inkscape's and etc left-alone epic devs) and the community. If that spirit of generosity and freedom is terminated, yeh, I concur, would be a really bad thing for the entire globe. We need'em if just to put MS nervous from time to time. Am just quite more optimistic. And am not yet sure if will be a bad thing or a good one in the long run, this new approach.

That version of Linux that seems MS is doing ( Azure Sphere OS, and I know the Azure stuff and MS moves since my time in the Linux company, a while ago. My "shock" about it is some years old), and where you can only use Windows and MS tools to develop apps for it... that it is/will be killing Linux... hmmm.....First, I believe is mostly for the IoT devices (makes a lot more sense to use sth (kernel) small and flexible, stable and that works, than reinvent the wheel for the IoT) , and the cloud to compete there against cloud based solutions (google, amazon, etc). Not so much the desktop. Second, T. Linus and others are yet leading certain stuff, and a large chunk of the community, I don't believe these would allow the main line to divert too much dangerously. Heck, nor the users themselves.  IMO, if anything Linux could get improvements at a faster speed.

But let's play with that other hypothesis.  IF it was all about an "evil strategy", I believe still it could not go according the best MS plans. The chaos factor and the human factor, randomly playing together against that. I mean, if they planned that "linux domination", that, given a second thought, kind of not seeming likely, they could be under estimating the powerful desire of mountains of users (it has grown too much, IMO...decades... would be a case of too little, too late, if the plan is to transform the whole Linux community to their terms, and again, slowly terminate it) , people willing to stay away from MS, and doing their own thing, that has too strong roots (despite the lack of neck beards). What I believe is, well, I cannot guess the future, but IF this serves to bring a bit of the professional ways (only in the matter of knowing that certain industry specs must be met. That is not secondary. That a CMYK mode is not a ....bleh, we'll see in 2030...if anything) of doing things to Linux, and in the other side, makes Linux users/devs/linux companies get to realize/"discover" where are the real weaknesses for professionals, specially in the graphics field, that wouldn't have to be necessarily bad, might be even be positive. As there's an outstandingly obvious lack of money and resources, right now. Blender and Gimp could use extremely well just a little bit of investment (passion makes any bit of money get a lot more performance than in a lot of the commercial closed source world!) to at least get the people at it having more solid salaries, and adding more people. The teams are ridiculously small... Permanent coders in Gimp, what is... 3 persons? I don't remember, but checked to be ultra small.   All this in exchange of loosing independence, nope, that'd be a too high price.

If Linux users/devs/companies/organizations/gurus keep saying that Linux apps are already there, compliant with the industry standards and the pro market ( in some fields, they are, I can agree), then we're doomed. You can't improve what is already "perfect" or "good enough", you know (you wouldn't even ever improve yourself, so to speak...). And yeah, they keep improving, but need a very different pace, other speed ( Blender's doing just fine, IMO)... The "enemy" goes WAY faster, even while already counting on a huge advantage. Keeping in this way the catching up will remain impossible ..If they think a bunch of the lacking apps are "professional", Houston, we have a problem.

I'm all for Linux improving. Could be the entry path to the professional world for a bunch of people (it is already in many areas,: my main objection is that in graphics is NOT yet there, sadly) and overall companies getting to use software in a huge number of countries in the second and third world. It can be the difference (or contributing to that) of developing large areas or doom them for ever. It is also essential for millions of people living in the first world (these "beautiful" contrasts...) but who can barely pay the electricity bill. Same reason why I believe Serif plays a similar role, in other scale of things , extremely affordable price (compare the usual 2k -6k of a suite from Adobe, at purchase-only times, or heck, even now with the cloud) for a several years worthy apps trio, no forced update, which can serve full studio workflows.

I mean, I'm almost always hearing people putting the accent in Linux being an alternative for a lot of users who can afford to have 2 or 3 machines in their house ( together with their Win /OSX licenses, no prob),  one or two being latest gen. And to do so for a matter of taste, pride, or ethics ( and that's not bad, either). But not so often is remembered than a huge part of the humanity will only be able to access professional software if Linux finally triumphs in all areas. It MUST invade the company/pro world, the market, the industry (it will by inertia and word of mouth once meets the industry standards), to give all these people a real chance (software like Serif's, also do, BTW! Thanks to the "included" OEM Windows) , IMO. What I deeply dislike is both denying the current situation in graphics apps and pestering commercial closed source apps companies, when they have pretty good FOSS apps to support as a starting base, as it all will only lead to keep being in stagnation and fully surpassed by the commercial solutions in almost every aspect. And so, never reaching that point where somebody, be it a poor human being with a windows  (the "free" OEM windows the machine came with)  or Linux machine, who cannot purchase a 3DS Max or now pay its outstandingly expensive monthly subscription bills (Adobe looks like charity besides these), or someone in a non-first world country trying to generate income for families, generating employment, fixing maybe their entire neighborhood (income and small owner businesses, often the best fight against crime, breaking so the misery cycle), and bringing income and tech to their country, would all this people have an actual option, free but also powerful, for making professional graphics. As, even a middle price for them is an unsurpassable barrier.

But until anyone can compete using these cross platform open source apps (over Linux or whatever),  until they can REALLY play against the big guys, (even a 80-90% of the top dog capability) they've got almost nothing. Because one could say, a lot of ppl in this situation just warez the apps (and they'll keep doing that until Linux graphics apps are an option to grab the outsourced gigs, or until Serif software or similar are in their reach in price (they are for a bunch of situations already) and availability)... Well, good luck in doing any sensible, long term business with the buccaneer hat, that's the way of the dodo, besides containing obvious big risks.

I'm hoping the next  "Linux sucks" video, or similar thing, would address more seriously and in detail the graphic software huge issues for a professional use (in graphics). And not staying in self-contempt by reminding to each other how amazing is Davinci Resolve is (it is!!), that the main standard today for a PBR material workflow for games(and etc), the Substance suite, counts on a Linux version (true as well!), Houdini's Linux version makes Linux pro for FX (again, true in several ways), Maya has a Linux version....But the DTP area, and many other aspects of graphic design, fully compete with Photoshop, graphics production in general...ouch. Really, if I wouldn't want so much that this would be a better reality, I wouldn't care to write so much. Not that it'll change even a single a bit anything at all, but at least I get to rant react to that....


 


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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The Linux side might be able to come to you. I've been reading through this thread and looking at people commenting on attempts to get it to run on Linux. Nobody has any idea what's under the hood. They're trying the usual things and they're not working.

What target does the Linux side of the house have to hit to make it relatively easy to port? Is Affinity software running different code for different graphics hardware? Should we emulate the iOS environment instead so we can run the iPad version? Run the new iOS versions on an iOS emulator running in Wine?  o.O

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Ehm.... FJ Guilford,  fjg3d  for a chance ?

Fully porting it by someone would need the company willing to provide the code freely, which I very strongly doubt (although other thing would be if internal talks and negotiations would happen with Linux devs or whatever, maybe needing NDA papers signed for anything to happen, if not contracts, and convincing the powers that be behind money. All my [*very*] wild guessing. Is what would need to happen at any commercial, closed source company I've worked at ).  I don't have an idea about the coding side, though.Neither what's needed for it finally working on Wine, indeed, several tried it, latest ones (very serious attempts) saying there was no way...


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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All this potential work and effort just to make up for the fact Linux is so 'lacking'. Even if you got Affinity software to work, what about all the other stuff, like printer drivers, plug-ins, green-screen software and all the dozens of other apps. All the professional stuff that is available off-the-shelf for PCs and Macs.

Remind me again, what is the point of Linux ?


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4 hours ago, toltec said:

Remind me again, what is the point of Linux ?

A lot would say that because code has to be free and all that.... Me, am not into that war, or philosophical dilema,  again, more of a barricades (graphics) grunt, you know....I kind of explained (in the last of my hidden and unbearable walls of text) my own main reasons (for hoping Linux reaches the best status possible for making graphics) : Because Windows costs from 100 to 140 euros (a sensible type of license, at least), in reality, 140, as is the cheapest one you can install in several machines, not forced to the one it came with (which when the machine breaks beyond repair, leaves that people alone in the rain). And so, because 140 euros is a freaking impossible barrier in many countries. Let alone there where you can't even purchase it, no physical way to do so, and importing from another country is absolutely out of range for the average joe/jane of those places. Because MS is increasing the things it should HAVE NEVER done, and does now more than before (XP+Win 7 times look like paradise, now...) , because of its current position (and IMO, because is going a bit the way of the Dodo) and switch of the desktop to be more of a service (and maybe a big data collector). Because is nice to have an option without all that cr4p.....Because is great/healthy to give the two giants (in number of desktops, is mostly one...) some competition, but this would be a very secondary reason. All these are of quite less value/importance, except the very first one I gave in this paragraph. That one is HUGE to have the best hopes for Linux.

Even so, I'm definitely not gonna be again the hero ( at a company and also as a freelancer) trying ( actually being successful at it) to make work so many things that don't work for a graphics pro. Once I'll see from outside that the stuff is improved enough, even if not 100% showtime ready, but almost ready ( a lot of the stuff you mention is ready, @toltec, but incomplete, randomly complete to say the least, and that goes against professional use even having the best intentions in favor of Linux) I might then jump in, even to just support it. The price to pay is high if not, and already paid it in its day (everyday during years)... And my main take at it, for what I am upset, is that back in 2002 and before (I've been dealing with this stuff since the 90s), one could argue that there were no resources, no way to care about this. Today, there's a large number of brains, volunteers, money, companies behind Linux, organizations, etc, etc, etc, enough to have put a lot more "love" into the whole graphic content creation thing, as much as has gone to all sort of network, coding, systems or cloud initiatives. But IMO, there's simply no real interest in the community, as a whole, in graphics creation software. Only a few epic heroes and heroines, which are completely left alone to their fight, but that's far from enough to get a platform where an artist, a graphic professional of a bunch of fields, could say goodbye to Windows or OSX and the apps that run over them. Still...gotta tell ya, I have hope....

Edit : My own dream, to be fully sincere, is not "abandoning" a system, but have 3 machines (been years maintaining 4 -5 OSes at home at a time, so, no biggie), each one with one of the systems, being able to do everything with each. That would give always the best option. As there are always peculiarities and "best tool for the task", even among very high end and complete solutions. And well, mostly, because I'm geek/nerd beyond repair. I like this stuff by itself. I like a terminal as much as the latest graphic desktop. So, I don't hate OSes, lol. But I'm lucky to be in the first world (kind of), lucky to be able to afford it. A luck that I don't deserve more than other people...


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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2 hours ago, toltec said:

Remind me again, what is the point of Linux ?

Linux is on my main systems. I only do graphics work to support document creation, not as a primary task. I only keep Windows around until such time as everything runs under emulation. But let's not go into that.

If you look at Darktable and Inkscape, you at last see programs running on Linux that generate publication quality graphics. Gimp is finally stable, and a few years ago I was actually able to complete a project in Gimp without having to run back to Photoshop. There are even some nice animation programs on Linux (Tupi, Toon Boom, Open Toonz, etc.). That's not really my thing, but it shows that Linux is a graphics platform.

I like the interface and design choices made by Affinity Designer. I think it occupies a unique market niche, not just cost-wise. I'm sure that's why people keep trying to run it on Wine. It would solve a problem with very little effort.

If you look at the software examples I've listed above, you see what the Linux world does to things that it can't have. This brings me back to my original question, which is how can we have it? Or more specifically, what target do we have to hit to get it to run on Wine? I'm sure the code authors know they're doing something unusual that the emulator is having trouble with. With that piece of information, I can pester the Wine developers about what to add.

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1 hour ago, SrPx said:

a lot of the stuff you mention is ready

Well, as a former trades person (out to pasture :() supplying services to professional designers,  what I would have needed is (was).

Printer drivers for my dye-sub printer.

Printer drivers for my proofing printer.

Silk screen multi-colour separation software.

Green-screen software.

Imposition software.

More than 10 years after I first tried Linux, none of that is available. OK, maybe I will concede that it is usable occasionally, for enthusiasts and geeks with low expectations but personally, I don't see the point of being so restricted, just because of a 'protest' OS. I don't even think it's that good, but that's an opinion. Probably not shared by Linux enthusiasts ;)

So again, what is the point of Linux?


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

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28 minutes ago, Guilford said:

which is how can we have it?

Buy a PC or a Mac :D

Serif are busy. Lots of upgrades needed, especially to Designer.

Quite a lot of bug fixes.

Lot's of stuff need for Publisher.

A DAM is needed.

Why should existing users (who have paid) have to wait just to satisfy a few users who want a 'protest' OS ? Let's be honest, the main draw of Linux is 'something for nothing' on cheap secondhand machines. It would make far more financial sense for Serif to make a cut down mini app for Android. The sort of person who will spend hundreds on a phone would think nothing of paying for Affinity Photo. Most Linux users will always want free, open source software, which is the biggest thing holding Linux back IMHO.

It's like communism, as soon as China started introducing market places and capitalism, they started doing OK ;)


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

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16 minutes ago, toltec said:

So again, what is the point of Linux?

People are looking more and more for alternatives, while apple starts to unsatisfy professional users more and more, to optimize the money making.

And Microsoft increases calling to home ... Windows 10 is a mix of good parts and shit.

Feels some like Apple and Microsoft starts sacryfing themselves.

 

 

I moved to Linux completely about 2 years ago, after the Deepin Desktop convinced me to be a better alternative.

I didn't like Microsofts politics ... resetting system settings (for advertising) after some updates, asking me if i really want to switch the browser and not to use the better edge browser, when I just to set another browser as default. I want to use my system, not to be patronized.

 

At work we have windows ... and after evaluation i found that the affinity products match my needs best.

Unfortunately, i can not use them on my linux machine at home.

 

If there would be a WINE solution ... unfortunately, as far as i know and tried out ... there is NO support for  64bit DOT.NET on wine. And won't be within next time ...

I guess supporting 64bit dot net would be the first step, because i don't expect another solution for affinity products on linux, then that.

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9 minutes ago, toltec said:

Why should existing users (who have paid) have to wait just to satisfy a few users who want a 'protest' OS ? Let's be honest, the main draw of Linux is 'something for nothing' on cheap secondhand machines.

You're giving me hope.

If there woulde be an popular android tablet like the iPad with super pencil support, the Android platform might be interesting for Serif.

And if there is a Android version, the linux desktop version might be not so fary away any more ...

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1 hour ago, Guilford said:

This brings me back to my original question, which is how can we have it? Or more specifically, what target do we have to hit to get it to run on Wine? I'm sure the code authors know they're doing something unusual that the emulator is having trouble with. With that piece of information, I can pester the Wine developers about what to add.

@Guilford That is indeed very interesting, I look forward to the possibility that Wine option would become a working solution. Is the one having more actual future, probably.

I'm almost 100% sure you know the following threads, but just in case you don't, and could throw some light to your research, or of use for the Wine developers you know :

https://forum.affinity.serif.com/index.php?/topic/65310-an-attempt-to-run-affinity-designer-on-linux-via-wine/&tab=comments#comment-338587

And very important (maybe more) this one :

https://forum.affinity.serif.com/index.php?/topic/63600-an-answer-to-can-affinity-photo-run-in-wine-on-linux/&tab=comments#comment-329802

 

 


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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1 minute ago, toltec said:

Why should existing users (who have paid) have to wait just to satisfy a few users who want a 'protest' OS ?

I am an existing user on Windows. I'd like to run my copy on Linux so I don't have to fire up my windows machine. Think about the logistics of running dual monitors and then having two machines try to share the monitors. I'm building a new Linux box and was going through my software list to see what I'm going to need, and Designer came up, so I thought I'd ask about progress running on Linux.

Most of the open source commie software is a direct result of the corporate world not responding to what people want. They have "better things to do". If that's the case here, then we identify the situation and take the same actions as before. If Serif wants to help run it in emulation, then we pay, because it's only $50 and alot less trouble than getting an emulator to work.

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5 minutes ago, Requester said:

People are looking more and more for alternatives, while apple starts to unsatisfy professional users more and more, to optimize the money making.

And Microsoft increases calling to home ... Windows 10 is a mix of good parts and shit.

Feels some like Apple and Microsoft starts sacryfing themselves.

I've been hearing the same argument for over 10 years, and you may be right but 10 years on Linux has hardly moved on, still none of the basic, professional stuff I need.

PCs and Macs have moved on by leaps and bounds, at least the software has. Frankly I couldn't care less about the OS. I buy computers to run software that lets me do things, not admire the OS.


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Please, somebody (anybody) read my (two last ones) posts above.... :D:D:D:D  

They're shorter this time !   :D 


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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2 minutes ago, SrPx said:

Please, somebody (anybody) read my (two last ones) posts above.... :D:D:D:D  

They're shorter this time !   :D 

Give me a sec..... Great. That's sort-of what I wanted to know.

I'm looking at some of the dependencies Meteo was listing, and Aero just pops right out. Are there any command line options for Designer that might control library versions it's trying to use? I'm assuming it would take a few hours of time for Serif to run their software in Wine and flag the errors in a debug version. I'm sure it would cost less that $500k. Failing on new file creation sounds like a trivial error. I wonder what it could be? He didn't ask the software to do anything difficult.

I'm starting to think stupid thoughts. If it's Aero, I should be able to run TeamViewer on both sides and just run Designer on a headless Windows box. I think I'll try that next rather than doing my own custom Wine installation. Allright, thanks SrPx. That's it for me for now. When I have more free time, I'll come back to this thread and let you know how it worked out.

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20 minutes ago, Guilford said:

Are there any command line options for Designer that might control library versions it's trying to use?

There is no command line support built into any Affinity app. 


Affinity Photo 1.7.3, Affinity Designer 1.7.3, Affinity Publisher 1.7.3; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.3.155 & Affinity Designer 1.7.3.1 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iPadOS 13.1.2

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46 minutes ago, Guilford said:

Are there any command line options for Designer that might control library versions it's trying to use?

@Guilford Yup, If I'm understanding you correctly, indeed there are. But is fully unsupported and not recommended. And not sure if working yet, and/or will work in the future. You can't get support ( I think it's not logged or sth) if using Affinity this way. Still, might be of great interest for several reasons for this all which we are talking about :

--no-dwm-warning

You can just set that in the Windows desktop icon properties ( is very easy) , I used to have it in beta times until realized I preferred jut to set a very minimal aero config. For sometime I had the two icons.  I'm guessing you might also (dunno) load this way from Windows command line (console).

DWM is the  Desktop Windows Management Composition , and I have some posts about how you could disable most Aero features. Anyway, your latest solution is... actually using windows, if all you are going to do is have other machine (a Windows one) running Designer and access it via teamviewer. That one allows to setup for best performance, but unless you have a great network setup, that thing is gonna lag. If goes through inet, and/or some sort of wifi, I'd predict issues....

Edit: Probably running Affinity with the parameter leads to a sub-optimal way of work for the app. Dunno what stuff could go wrong, really.   But... in this very specific case, Wine, people is used to hacks and reduced functionality or even some glitches... so.... what the heck, it's worth a try,  right? I just don't have any linux box or VM ( my last job, got me freakingly used to have some VMware or Virtual Box with any number of fully installed distros under my windows machine, as well as a number of Windowses in VMs under the Linux box on the table I had access to(sometimes even accessing the VMs remotely. LOL ) at the moment,  neither Wine to test it. Neither any terrible interest/need on doing so, but yep have curiosity in knowing if a solution is met at some point, one way or the other....

Edit 2 : From one developer, about using that parameter :
"   Windows will fallback to using a legacy driver model, which can lead to rendering and performance problems. This only affects Windows 7, as from Windows 8 onwards, DWM Composition is always enabled "

 


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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12 minutes ago, SrPx said:

Yup, If I'm understanding you correctly, indeed there are.

Are you talking about CLI options for Aero, or for Affinity?


Affinity Photo 1.7.3, Affinity Designer 1.7.3, Affinity Publisher 1.7.3; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.3.155 & Affinity Designer 1.7.3.1 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iPadOS 13.1.2

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1 minute ago, R C-R said:

Are you talking about CLI options for Aero, or for Affinity?

Quote

Aero just pops right out. Are there any command line options for Designer that might control library versions it's trying to use?

For context, I kind of supposed he wanted to load an Affinity app without needing Aero....


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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Just edited my post to add some more info about that parameter.


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About the DWM whole thing and Wine, altho linked above, I find very interesting to paste @Echoa  's very useful post (not sure if he tried all that using the famous parameter, in Windows 7 ) about the matter. I hope he forgives me for pasting here his full post :

================
[   Thread:   An answer to "Can Affinity Photo Run in WINE on Linux?"    ]
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The short answer, no

The longer answer, kinda

The installer will run once you have .Net 4/4.5/4.7 installed in your Wine Prefix (used staging 3.13) and completes without any problems. Its starting it up that gets rough.

The windows version of Affinity photo requires the Windows DWM for composition of the application screen and has some custom DLLs that dont seem to happy to hook into the WINE implementation of Windows. The DLLs just straight fail to load at all and while you can get it to attempt to run switching WINE to Windows 8/10 bypassing the Aero not enabled, the application crashes just after opening.

 

I haven't done extensive testing to get it to actually open, but truth be told you likely won't see good results even if you do. It'll likely run very unstable and slow which defeats it's entire purpose. I imagine because WINE doesn't have a complete DX11 implementation, doesn't have Windows DWM, and doesn't have/implement in full/doesn't implement the exact same any number of other necessary Windows parts it's just not going to be enjoyable. I don't know exactly how ingrained in the Windows ecosystem (dlls, etc)  the windows version of Affinity Photo is but my guess is more than WINE can deal with at this time. 

 

Hope this helps anyone on Linux looking for an answer and saves you from wasting your time trying to get an application going in WINE just to have it run awful.

EDIT: some issue could be a combo of it requiring .NET Framework and a 64bit install/Prefix. Wine can be a bit sketchy with .NET in 64bit prefixes and not all functions work running .NET application. Issues could also be arising from the rendering engine not enjoying running in WINE . Ive tried everything i ccan to narrow down exactly what issues are causing the DLLs in the program folder to not load and i have to just chalk it up to "AP needs fully implemented windows"


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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