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2 minutes ago, VIPStephan said:

I seem to remember Serif mentioning that it’s not on their agenda to do any Linux version, not because of lack of money but because of lack of resources (time and programmers). They are already struggling to keep their promises on the Mac and Win versions so the last of their concerns is to start development for yet another platform.

but then why not just make this thing crossplatform in the first place so that it doesnt need too much customization for each platform?

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9 hours ago, OllieCo said:

So is there any recent developments or word from Serif on this apart from asking for 500K? I mean, have they actually announced a kickstarter project at all?

They have never asked for 500K, & have said they have no interest in raising any money for anything via a Kickstarter project because it does not fit their business model. When asked, they estimated it would cost around 500K to develop a Linux version, but that was never intended as a firm number or a commitment to anything.


Affinity Photo 1.6.7 & Affinity Designer 1.6.1; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.6.11.85 & Affinity Designer 1.6..4.45 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iOS 12.1.1

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35 minutes ago, My1 said:

but then why not just make this thing crossplatform in the first place so that it doesnt need too much customization for each platform?

The core back end code was designed to be platform-independent from day one. But developing the remaining code to produce a commercially viable "native" platform version involves a great deal more that what you call customization.

 

For example, consider the considerable differences in windowing & menu systems for each platform, or in how they implement inter-application communications, memory management, or file system access.


Affinity Photo 1.6.7 & Affinity Designer 1.6.1; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
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Hello everyone

 

I have found a very interesting blog today about porting windows applications to linux.

These date back 2014 but are very well written, for those interested:

https://anteru.net/blog/2014/02/05/2272/index.html part 1

https://anteru.net/blog/2014/02/13/2275/index.html part 2

https://anteru.net/blog/2014/02/21/2305/index.html part 3

 

there are a lot of interesting posts on this site, beware!

 

There are 2 recap, one after 6months and the other after a year in which he mentions debugging is harder on linux, it was prior the existence of CLion.

 

Hope you enjoy

 

a

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Hi all. 

Just to have an idea were you are going or not, may I ask what is your target with affinity?

When I was told about a photoshop equivalent with ocio support I was pretty damn sure it was for vfx and post production, so I get curious. I couldn't be more surprised when I discoverd  you have no intention to go linux... 

I work in a company where 150 artists have two computers : a linux machine because every vfx studio in this world work full linux, and a windows machine, because there is no equivalent of photoshop in linux...

Let's calculate : 3000 (price of the machine estimated by me, but that is a rough idea) × 150 (per artist) = 450 000 .... Well what you need for developping linux is what my company is paying for not having such a tool. I am not taking in account the pain photoshop is making in our pipeline.

I am not taking in account the price it would cost to change software and train people either, but I am only talking about one company (and only a part of it) in the whole vfx industry.

But for sure, no linux, no place in vfx.

Sorry to put a bit of my disapointment in this message. I thougt for few days that a revolution was going on, but.. Nah...

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Interesting discussion.

 

As a web developer and long time Windows user I found myself buying a Mac because because of how well it runs a (LAMP) web server and also for the many good options for graphics software.

 

Like many others freelancers, I would head for the torrent sites for the latest version of Adobe Creative Suite rather than be taken advantage of with their expensive subscription fees. Then Affinity came along with a viable and affordable alternative and I was more than happy to pay up for legit copies of both Designer and Photo.

 

I fell out of love with Apple after my £2,700 MacBook Pro failed after only three years usage. After the SSD was removed, it was worth only £300 as scrap on ebay. More recently, many Macbook owners have complained about the gimmick touchbar, underwhelming specs and of course 'donglegate'. 

 

Feeling let down by Apple, I decided to revisit Windows only to conclude once again that without powerful hardware, it was not suitable for running open source web apps or a demanding web server. To my surprise, I was also told by Affinity they would not transfer my licenses to Windows and that I would have to buy them again. (cough, torrents are available).

 

So once again I find myself looking at Linux and once again I find that the graphic choices are less than ideal. 

 

As a web designer I need good illustration tools for logos, comps and layouts. I need export options for jpg, png and these days more usually for svg. As for photo editing I just need basic tools such as cropping and exposure adjustment.

 

It is a matter of fact that many web designers have moved over to Sketch. It is better than Photoshop for website and app design. It also has support for symbols and grids; and whilst it's photo editing is poor, it is good enough for the basic tasks and it can also export to css, which is a bonus.

 

The price point of Sketch is similar to that of Affinity. And like Affinity they also have a fairer understanding of the subscription model than Adobe. Customers get to keep the software they have invested in, whilst repeat subscribers benefit from new features and ongoing support. 

 

Of big interest to me is that there is now a new kid on the block. Gravit Designer is free and it is available for OSX, Windows, Linux, Chrome OS, iPad, Android and also as a web app that will work in the browser! Gravit Designer is a cutting edge product and is probably what the next generation of software will look like. Whilst their start-up business model is not yet defined, more established software houses should look seriously at the value (and disruption) that small teams can deliver in this day and age.

 

For myself personally, the idea of portable, cross platform software is very attractive. Moreover, I am happy to a pay a fair price for it, but I don't want taking for a ride, nor do I want to pay again for each of my devices.

 

I wonder if Affinity are still reading this thread?

 

 

 

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10 hours ago, beruffled said:

I wonder if Affinity are still reading this thread?

We are. And you are not buying for each device, you are buying for each operating system, which is how we develop it and licence it, and price it accordingly. And to come here and practically admit to downloading from torrents,  or encourage other people to do,  I find extraordinarily rude. 


Patrick Connor

Serif (Europe) Ltd.

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11 hours ago, beruffled said:

Gravit Designer is a cutting edge product and is probably what the next generation of software will look like.

I downloaded & tried out the Mac version. While it seems very full featured, there are quite a few things about it that are anything but "cutting edge," at least compared to typical modern Mac apps. To name a few, there is no close item on the file menu, no support for dragging & dropping supported file types onto the app icon to open them in the app, & (unless I missed a setting somewhere) incredibly no support for 'live' dragging of objects on the canvas so all I see when I am moving something is its outline.

 

Basically, it gives me the impression that it is a weird combination of 1990's & 21st century technologies.


Affinity Photo 1.6.7 & Affinity Designer 1.6.1; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
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Why in hell would one beed a file then close Action? There's iirc a close icon in mac, and for keyboard users, if mac doesn't ha e something like alt+f4 on windows it's really retarded 

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11 minutes ago, My1 said:

There's iirc a close icon in mac, and for keyboard users, if mac doesn't ha e something like alt+f4 on windows it's really retarded 

There is a tiny close icon in the upper right corner of the UI, but the app ignores the standard Mac OS keyboard input to close a window (CMD + W).


Affinity Photo 1.6.7 & Affinity Designer 1.6.1; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
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I've used AD since it was released in November of 2014. My first impression, which has held, is that the developers have a new vision of what a Vector program can be like. I think it's a solid vision. IMO, if anyone's stuck in the 90s with a little splash of the 2000s, it's adobe, who I regard as a sad case of greed disease..a company that once made great software tools and chose to milk customers rather than to innovate.

I feel the same about Mac OS and have stopped upgrading my Macs. I will probably not buy another Mac, having gone to Linux, which doesn't exert the same pressure to upgrade every year or so. If Apple could relax and support their machines for longer, I'd stay, but it seems that Apple desires a customer with money to burn. That isn't me, nor will it ever be me.

On the Linux side, I've found software tools that do what I need them to do. I won't bother arguing whether or not they're "just like Adobe." Happily, they are not.

If AD were offered for Linux, I'd grab it on the spot, but I respect the costs of developing software versus the numbers of potential customers; if it doesn't pencil out, you can't do it unless somebody hands you a suitcase full of money.

I am a designer/illustrator with 30 years' experience and I can testify that there's nothing important which AD doesn't do that AI offers. However, there are significant things Illustrator doesn't do, or doesn't do well, that AD offers, or excels at. Not the least of which is that AD is well-behaved software. Not burdened by bloaty code and the workflow is solid and reliable.

That's my 2 piasters.


 2012 Mac Book Pro 12”, 8GB RAM, Mojave  |  2017 iPad Pro 12.9” 256GB, iOS 12.1.1

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On 20/12/2017 at 6:43 AM, Enjoae said:

 

Quote

Just to have an idea were you are going or not, may I ask what is your target with affinity?

 

I believe that one of the possible takes (but is just what I suppose) it might be to make a suite of 3 applications (at the possible pace and in the long run, which is the interesting one) to cover the needs of professionals and hobbyists making DTP work, general image editing, huge focus on Photography, design work and providing certain painting functionality (but not being the main focus, as IMO, it neither was PhotoPlus, in the case of the raster software, Photo.) There are a number of apps doing some of these things in most platforms, but rarely one this complete. Specially being already in two platforms. Which is, despite the critics here, a royal lot if one look at the real competition (Adobe, Corel, Xara)

 

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When I was told about a photoshop equivalent with ocio support I was pretty damn sure it was for vfx and post production, 

 

No offense, but that was too much of a guessing.  Also, I don't know you, but I got the news about the apps as usual, by reviews and word of mouth. And in the reviews, and all what was being said, pretty much was very clear which was the focus and fields it aims to. (the general area I mentioned above). It is different if one wishes that it'd be all about each one's favorite field...But that's like disconnecting a bit from the real scenario, I wish it were mostly a painting focused tool but capable of all image editing. But then again, Photoshop is neither greatly optimized for painting (I should know, am a designer, but also an illustrator using PS in every company I land at, been painting with it decades). Plus, the market in general 2D is way larger. Again, a matter of numbers. You might tell me no as is what your direct environment is telling you, but things are like that : I learnt this lesson with several of my favorite fields in the past. One might be surrounded at the work place by linux people doing graphics, but is needed a more global view.

 

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Like many others freelancers, I would head for the torrent sites for the latest version of Adobe Creative Suite

 

Guess what, despite the obvious legal (and in the end, practical) issues this has, there's some aspects to consider. Specially for painting : Performance is WAY different between PS and other tools, specially for painting. Of course, an OLD CS2 runs in almost  any Windows 7 without lag , but CC, and specially the latest ones, are pretty darn heavy, memory eaters and really not handling that nicely. Don't take me wrong. PS and Illustrator are BEASTS on what they allow you to do, but at the end of the day, for me value is a global equation, and really, Photo and AD are much, much lighter in that department. In old machines, or simply, not very powerful ones, painting can be pretty laggy in PS. This , after some clever configs, is not a huge problem while just doing pure image editing, (though when the load is extreme on resources, this really have its impact), but in painting...it can ruin the experience. Affinity products, CSP, Krita are much lighter in memory and similar matters.

 

Not only this is a time were the top apps are not the one and only option... Is a time when the alternatives can be even MORE convenient for a lot of individuals. So, in the end is mostly related not only to your money situation, or your inclination to put more money where you could avoid some excessive costs, is also in how sustainable you want your hobby, or freelance activity to be. Same reason why some people prefer to go PC instead of Mac. Again, nothing wrong in one way or the other. Freelancers we tend not to be in that situation, but people earning 5k - 8k a month, might be able to pay all the regular bills, and so that a  certain spending per month in software and in hardware very often, getting the top edge stuff always, well, is not an issue at all, but time is, and they prefer to invest their time in their day job and relaxing, and not needing to learn new tools, or use time in adapting workflows to get same performance with new ways and tools.

 

Thing is, you get (when purchasing AP or AD) fast applications, high performance, in low/mid machines, you find your self doing the advanced stuff you know is advanced as is what you used to do at companies (with Adobe suite, Corel, etc), same advanced tasks, different software, with mid/low cost (or even free tools; the general trend of considering the 100% of free software as impossible to be "pro" is quite a wrong way of  thinking. With some special tools, is just harder). If you are capable of adaptation, you are really making a good business there. My view on the matter is that there are two ways of earning money, one is just getting paid, and the other is not expending like crazy. I know is an incorrect way of putting things from a semantic pov, but you get the idea. It's a global balance. Also, the machine is not the single criteria. Even if you have a great machine, the better efficiency ends up being great for a number of projects which are really resource hogs, and which even in a great machine, will find its limits. This limit will be much farther in more memory and cpu efficient software. I can tel you, among the two, seems to me a lot more effcicient Photo than PS, or at least, needing less memory in general for everything (and despite the critics, PS can lag quite even more in painting). Again, no issue at all with people with recent, and top machines. IE, any Ryzen 7, or even more, a coffee lake 8700k with at least 16GB of fast, new ram, will do more than fine with any app today. But working constantly with huge files in pixels dimensions (print, etc), you want to be able to paint without lag, for example. (note aside : Also, to present work in contests, stock sites, administration, etc, the torrent "versions" will put you in quite some big problems. It'd be not very intelligent while having a software like Photo or AD for just 50 bucks each with free updates, to go for torrenting  (if that word exists, lol) the other suite; apps not so sure to be better for you in the first place !..And for strictly painting, but not capable of doing the complete thing like AP does, there's a ton of free/low cost tools...so, no point, at all. I know everyone says, Adobe is better... well, not always, not every application/usage, and I know this not just as a theory.)

 

Quote

Sorry to put a bit of my disapointment in this message. I thougt for few days that a revolution was going on, but.. Nah...


Then...think again.  It IS a revolution. Of huge magnitude, specially for those of us working doing graphics since '95, gives you the right perspective. Does not fit as you wish your specific field? Neither does mine (main being drawing comics/illustration, reason why I 'm pairing the tools with my previous ones, no issue in that) . But I would be not sincere if not recognizing this as quite some great find. (for now Photo is not my painting tool, but will for sure be my integrator tool. And AD is already, totally my vector, design tool.)

 

Quote

Feeling let down by Apple, I decided to revisit Windows only to conclude once again that without powerful hardware, it was not suitable for running open source web apps or a demanding web server. To my surprise, I was also told by Affinity they would not transfer my licenses to Windows and that I would have to buy them again. (cough, torrents are available).

 

Indeed, what I've done, for many years as a web designer/developer (till relatively recently), is to work with a Windows machine for doing all my graphics work, and even code (heh, after so many years, I'm rather comfortable in the platform, have my tricks), then upload to the cloud, or samba servers, git windows clients, putty, scp, etc. Many flavors, finding out my favorite workflows for each matter. And I can say, after some training, no issue at all. Even more, I see certain advantages on having at least two machines, one for the server stuff and etc, and a dedicated one for graphics production. Today I don't do massive work for the web, the typical small gig of graphics/code can be done just in my windows machine, no real need for linux for that (not a frontend developer any more. But have been, and saw that as a winning formula. Or could have been just the same having a Mac, and the linux server besides or in the servers room, remote connecting by many, many ways and systems.). 

 

Quote

So once again I find myself looking at Linux and once again I find that the graphic choices are less than ideal. 

 

I have worked with Gimp quite, and really, for just web , sorry but is way less demanding (also in knowledge/training needed) in everything for graphics than it is in print media. I dislike quite the UI, coming from PS, but is VERY capable for just web design. Far from ideal does not mean is not capable. I myself see no point now, tho, being so possible to purchase easily AD and AP. And it really is worth the money ! (with this I mean : the money for both 50 + 50, AND a Windows license, which is also somehow cheap, and which you can very easily have installed in multi boot with your Linux, or have a linux VM, or... as efficient as is Linux with low hardware, you can have your test server in a cheapo second hand machine, to test the developments)

 

Quote

As a web designer I need good illustration tools for logos, comps and layouts. I need export options for jpg, png and these days more usually for svg. As for photo editing I just need basic tools such as cropping and exposure adjustment.

 

You have all this in Gimp....Edit: and export as SVG, you could use instead then Inkscape (and do the photo work in Gimp), It has its strong points. There have been places where all the software I'd get access was Gimp & Inkscape, and other open source of several flavors for video. Stuff can be done, there are limits, but there are also workarounds.  I'm against subscription models or excessive license costs, but 50 bucks per software is absolutely no reason to not purchase such complete packages.

 

Quote

The price point of Sketch is similar to that of Affinity. And like Affinity they also have a fairer understanding of the subscription model than Adobe. Customers get to keep the software they have invested in, whilst repeat subscribers benefit from new features and ongoing support. 

 

Probably you meant it differently, but just in case: In Affinity it's even better, then, as you get free updates for a long time, is only with major version releases when you get to purchase again (if you'd wish so). Couple that with the fact that is really cheap, it's a win-win situation.

 

Quote

Of big interest to me is that there is now a new kid on the block. Gravit Designer is free and it is available for OSX,

 

I believe it has been mentioned/linked several times in this thread. My question is : If it is that good for their purpose, the people who mention it in this very thread and pushing for getting a Linux version of Affinity.... why don't just use it, why all the hassle of claiming here a Linux Affinity version ? Dunno, makes me think.

 

Quote

Windows, Linux, Chrome OS, iPad, Android and also as a web app that will work in the browser! Gravit Designer is a cutting edge product and is probably

 

This has already been also object of conversation several times before in this same thread, but I seriously doubt the so top level of performance tasks a lot of us need to accomplish (fast, without lags, etc, pro work requires this), are going to use the hardware just as efficiently , things so tied to the GPU, CPU, the wacom drivers, the full RAM and disk usage for multi layered huge print files, etc, etc, running on a browser,  If that is equally possible in an app over a browser, than with a completely native code based application, that I would have to not just see in a conference, experimental test on youtube or event : I'd need like 5 weeks checking that doing my own every day work with it... then I might get convinced about that. Seen that kind of speculation before, I'd need to see it proved in real life scenarios.

 


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On 12/23/2017 at 11:30 PM, beruffled said:

Of big interest to me is that there is now a new kid on the block. Gravit Designer is free and it is available for OSX, Windows, Linux, Chrome OS, iPad, Android and also as a web app that will work in the browser! Gravit Designer is a cutting edge product and is probably what the next generation of software will look like. Whilst their start-up business model is not yet defined, more established software houses should look seriously at the value (and disruption) that small teams can deliver in this day and age

 

I suggest Linux fans read carefully what SrPx says above.

 

A few points on the one paragraph, quoted above.

 

If Gravit Designer is so good, why do Linux users keep pestering Serif to produce a Linux version of Designer ?

 

A common Linux user claim is how Affinity would have little or no competition. How could Serif compete commercially with a "cutting edge" program like Gravit which is free ?

 

If you mention Gravit and business in the same sentence. What sort of business gives away it's products for free ? (ask any bank).

 

There is a distinct lack of logic, somewhere.

 

Happy Christmas


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

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Because its a testament to the quality of Affinity Designer/Photo and even if some might be surprised, people actually want to compensate others for quality products.

Here is some information why Gravit Designer is (still) "free" quote from the page below:
https://discuss.gravit.io/t/how-does-gravit-make-money/3002/3
 

Quote

we are licensing our rendering engine to other companies (not just laser-cutting, though),
which allows us to keep Gravit Designer totally free.
For the future, we’re also planning on a paid Marketplace and a paid Pro version, which will help us to keep the lights on.

 


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1 hour ago, myclay said:

Here is some information why Gravit Designer is (still) "free" quote from the page below:

I am very surprised that they mentioned their rendering engine because unless I am missing something it seems very primitive in that it does not do live updates as objects or nodes are moved around on the canvas. To see what I mean, watch their Selection Tools video tutorial. Note that at about the 0:22 mark, when the selected items are moved, just an unfilled, un-rendered outline is moved until the mouse button is released. The same thing happens when dragging nodes, their control handles, or stroke segments. (Beginning around the 1:00 mark in the video, this does not always seem to happen, but on my Mac it always does.)

 

For those that remember using the old Mac System 7 or 8 operating systems, this should remind you of how dragging windows just dragged an outline of the window until the mouse button was released. So while I might have considered it "cutting edge" if the year was 1992, now it just makes the app seem horribly outdated.


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Affinity Photo 1.6.11.85 & Affinity Designer 1.6..4.45 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iOS 12.1.1

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2 hours ago, R C-R said:

So while I might have considered it "cutting edge" if the year was 1992, now it just makes the app seem horribly outdated.

 

Outdated? Aw, c'mon! 1992 was only 25 years ago!! :o :P whistling.gif


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Affinity Designer 1.6.5.123 • Affinity Photo 1.6.5.123 • Windows 10 Home (4th gen Core i3 CPU)
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Stop and think! Imagine a user looking forward to Affinty for Linux! That's me! lololol

 

Macs are getting very expensive here in Brazil, another OS that designers look at from afar is Linux! Many users! Adobe does not seem to want to produce for linux, if Affinity wants to reach everyone who is migrating and current users. Dreams.

 

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well while I have no Idea about brazil and stuff, apple stuff is getting more expensive in the euro zone as well and windows is becoming worse and worse. isnt it possible to have affinity be a cross-platform sw that works with basically anything as long as serif would compile for it?

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4 hours ago, My1 said:

isnt it possible to have affinity be a cross-platform sw that works with basically anything as long as serif would compile for it?

In a word, no. Each OS has its own API's, some of which are significantly different from those of the others, with different capabilities & interdependencies. Everything from hardware access to security models may be abstracted differently enough that compiling the code for different ones would still require rewriting & hand tweaking large parts of it to optimize performance, or simply to get some features to work at all.

 

Beyond that, & perhaps more importantly, providing customer support becomes much more complicated as the number of supported OS's increases.

 

All this has been discussed to death in the many pages of this topic. There is little point in rehashing the same stuff over & over again.


Affinity Photo 1.6.7 & Affinity Designer 1.6.1; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
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Fortunately a company and its designers in china started creating a new linux desktop that combines best from windows and mac a few years ago.

It is called Deepin. Besides a fluent desktop design they complete the environment with lots of standard apps, to fill the gap, having a app for every use. (Screenshot, Backup, USB-Media creator, Calculator, Calendar, ...) and even a programming interface, to integrate your application in its desktop.

With using Manjaro Deepin, i was able to move sucessfully away from mac and windows.
For me it is the first serious competitor for mac and windows, still having some missing features, but getting updates and new applications regularly.

But with Affinity Photo and Affinity Designer, two new great apps, i start missing them in linux for sure.

At the moment lots of web developers migrate to Linux, due DELLS developer editions of the XPS notebook. Some get back to windows, since there is a linux subsystem available.

The old Photoshop ran fine with wine. But it's getting old ... and a software like Affinity Designer is painfully missing on Linux.

So i want to push the linux question again ... ;)

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Edited  : Forget it (just deleted a text wall, replaced with this line)... What I was saying about why not push Linux current graphic software instead (that deepin thing video even promote it as its software included), said it too many times in these forums... And Gimp/Inkscape ain't adding CMYK proper mode and other pro features for print anytime soon (and no, that's not a "small thing", as to receive that "low priority"...)  (edit: for a long time should be read as "for eons". Probably since 2002 or so when I was starting (I mean more seriously than before) with Blender.  The "CMYK, no, thank you" has decades, there... And since the beginning was "some related workflows are based on proprietary stuff"....and some Linux users would defend the attitude saying "printing is going to disappear" .. With that "disappearance" I've filled my plate of food for more than a decade...) 


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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@SrPX

 

It is clear that you are a passionate Gimp user. But there are two problems with it

 

1. It doesn't do vector graphics

2. It has  poor UI which people familiar with other products will have a difficult time adjusting to.

 

Personally I am still longing for an open source Fireworks

Edited by beruffled
Corrected typo

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@beruffledProbably you have read my fat ass post which I just edit-deleted..... Sorry.

 

More than liking Gimp, is that LIKED it, and still like how it is evolving to a much modern and mature project. But it makes me crazy to no end that in 2018 they still have in their current faq that they give CMYK a low priority.  Also, its graphic UI workflows are slow compared to other apps.

 

I know, is not a vector package, at some point of my deleted unreadable wall of text I mentioned it...it just shares with Inkscape (Linux based, open source too) the low priority given to print stuff, very specially color profiles, CMYK, etc. Which are key.

 

Yes, the UI can't compete with other products. Users from the begininning of it have got very used to it and are productive till some point, but the vast majority of it have not done so with Photoshop, or other apps as to compare fully. I have done both. IE, it took them a long time to make a one window UI, and still is just an option. Speaks about the interest of running away from a standard, which is original, and has its certain advantages, but imo is a wrong way, seen globally.  These times when UX is getting such importance (in some aspects, sadly) they stick to stuff that is not  that much of a good strategy.

 

In terms of UI in its excellent learning curve, there are tools like Xara and Afinity's. If they (devs of these two open source apps (IMO, Blender is  very different case)) really wanted to gain market - which I'm starting to doubt-  and I mean Win/mac users, but ALSO their own Linux users (this thread is such a proof of that their own OS users are in no way happy with the graphics apps scenario in Linux, in a large percentage....) they really really should be looking at Xara, Affinity and Paintshop Pro as UIs that rapidly engage the user !

 

That said, Inkscape, I could use that one for a ton of tasks (the company bought PS, pre CC times, but no way they'd allso buy Illustrator or similar. If not having PS, I'd have just used Gimp, as well... probably coupled with littleCMS and Scribus, etc) while working for almost a decade in certain recent company job. Of course, when any professional printing task made appearance -constantly- it was goodbye Inky, or at least, use it only for a small part of the project.  :/   For a long while I've tried to promote the 2 of them, and Scribus. But seeing no change in certain mindset towards pro usage makes it very very tiring... and...useless.

 


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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12 minutes ago, beruffled said:

Personally I am still longing for an open source Fireworks

 

No need anymore. Just stick to Affinity Designer.  :)


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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