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1 minute ago, Argo said:

Well, time will tell.

Indeed it will, but the real "story" here is about numbers. There are a great many more Mac & Windows users than Linux ones that are likely to buy inexpensive, no-subscription graphics software like the Affinity ones, so I doubt Serif has anything to worry about until such time as that market becomes saturated.


Affinity Photo 1.7.1, Affinity Designer 1.7.1, Affinity Publisher 1.7.1; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.1.143 & Affinity Designer 1.7.1.1 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iOS 12.3.1

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Just want to add a voice to those calling for Linux versions of the Affinity Suite.

I can drag out the old tale of how I am disillusioned with Apple, or how Windows is not Unix enough for me.

I can drag that out, and it would be true, but the real thing for me is that with the presence of very useable (even pleasant!) distros like Mint and PopOS, and with the range of software now available for these distros Linux is a real desktop alternative. The one thing that is missing is a good graphics package. GIMP does not cut it and neither does Inkscape.

If Serif was present in this space they would be alone, and they would be singlehandedly making the platform a more viable choice for technically-inclined graphic designers such as myself. Kid yourself not, there are a lot of us. The beauty of PopOS combined with access to a proper suite of graphics tools could push many of us over the edge.

There are two things I like in my computer world right now, PopOS and the Affinity Suite.

I cannot and will not attempt to instruct Serif on the economics of the thing, but one way or another I am migrating to PopOS out of despair of my other options and Apple's once-fabulous hardware.

I am begging Serif to come with me, and I can't be alone.

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43 minutes ago, Silas said:

I am begging Serif to come with me, and I can't be alone.

A lot of people have similar stories to yours. And while we (Linux crowd) understand the palette of reasons and benefits, from an outside perspective it still sounds like a choice you could have not made, i.e. complaining. The old comment by Patrick illustrates this well:

On 3/1/2017 at 12:53 PM, Patrick Connor said:

This discussion is a bit like this. "I used to live in France, but I decided I liked the look of Germany, it suits me better in so many ways. Disney have built a Disneyland in Paris, France, and although there are some fairly good parks in Germany there is nothing like a Disneyworld Germany at the moment. Please build one. I would pay the entrance fee and so would my friends."

This is of course a charged statement because Affinity makes tools that you use monthly, weekly, or sometimes daily. Disneyworld is something you'd visit between zero and one times. So a better comparison would be to move to a different city that has no fast food companies, and asking if McDonalds, KFC, Subway or Chipotle to open shop in your city. But the statement does show what it sounds like when you ask for Serif on Linux after stating that you're moving away from Apple.

I think (happy) Windows/MacOS users don't appreciate the 'sacrifice' (i.e. comfy availability of commercial software) you've made, because they don't understand the accumulation of things that make it worth it.

Even then, if you're switching to Linux full-time it probably means that you have grown accustomed to it for the past 5+ years, and have gotten acquainted with the general community mindset of getting everything to run on everything. This is in stark contrast with - generalizing from the loudest comments here - Windows (and especially) MacOS users, that seem to appreciate exclusivity while they are a part of it.

I guess the move from MacOS to Windows already incurred a loss of exclusivity and some angered responses over that were heard at the time too. The MacOS "creatives" had already suffered a dilution of their community with Windows "mainstreamers". And now they should welcome the Linux "zealots"? Hell no. Linux is the opposite of exclusivity, because everyone can install it on everything, for free. That can't be good or sustainable. It will infect everything it touches and turn it into the same ugly GTK+ muck we know Linux to be. (This paragraph is a dramatization from the perspective of a Linuxphobe.)

What I'm trying to say is that you, and the many before you, need a different story that appeals to the target audience (not the choir) more. I'm not sure it's possible though.

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Well,

You avoided my main point, but really I think you guys are over-analysing this whole thing.

I want Serif to build stuff for my OS of choice because on that OS I have everything I want but one thing ... Serifs excellent and sensibly priced and marketed software. While making my argument I think that there are benefits to Serif, so I mention that. The only real argument from the customer side for building the thing is that there is a market for it. I think there is.  The rest is up to them. I am here to be counted.

If I said nothing then that would be dumb.
If I dug holes in the argument for what I want then that too would be dumb.

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2 hours ago, Silas said:

I want Serif to build stuff for my OS of choice ...

There are many more people (than the linux market people) who want Serif to make Right to Left text work. There are many many more who want CJK language support. Serif can make far more money by working on those two problems than they can by porting over to to the linux market.


MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid 2012) Mac OS 10.12.6 || Mac Pro (Late 2013) Mac OS 10.14.5

Affinity Designer 1.7.2 | Affinity Photo 1.7.2 | Affinity Publisher 1.7.2 | Affinity Designer Beta 1.7.2.2 | Affinity Photo Beta 1.7.2.151 | Affinity Publisher Beta 1.7.2.458

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3 minutes ago, Old Bruce said:

There are many more people (than the linux market people) who want Serif to make Right to Left text work. There are many many more who want CJK language support. Serif can make far more money by working on those two problems than they can by porting over to to the linux market.

I think that's a statement without basis, the last one. However I agree with the core of the argument, serif is better off fixing the current issues (like the expand stroke bug, we'll soon reach 5 years since it's been first reported) than expanding into a new market. However I also have to poke holes at serifs previously mentioned accomplishments. Why boast about a platformless application core if you're not going to have it available on all platforms?


Mădălin Vlad
Graphic Designer

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Quote

Metal: so what? There are a number of cross-platform accelerated rendering APIs, and cross-platform UI toolkits. Some of them more accessible and/or as efficient as "Metal" or other "UI kits". I wager that these bindings don't form the whole of the API behind Affinity, otherwise it wouldn't exist on Windows.

One of the real big missed opportunity in the Linux market is an OS is (A LOT) more than a Kernel. But Linus, has little interest beyond the Kernel.

Windows, and even much more so, the MacOS offers a very complete framework with strong development tools to back it. Each of them well integrated and pre-tested, with symmetric APIs. What I've noticed in the Mac market is 1 programmer can readily pull off a well polished application, where in the Linux would it take a large team... with worse results. QT isn't even a fraction of the scale of the MacOS frameworks.  

On Metal. First, Metal was 2-3 years first to market before a similar open source library (Vulkan) was available. Should Apple wait for committees to catch up, or just innovate ahead? Second, just like Nvidia has Cuda, Microsoft has directX, Apple has Metal. People never give Nvidia a hard time for Cuda, so why complain about Apple? It turns out Apple is the largest GPU manufacturer in the world today, delivering 200-400 Million iPhone GPUs per year. They want to control their technology destiny like everybody else..

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...at least there must be an argument why most of the bigger players in software aren’t publishing their programs for the Linux world: Steinberg (Cuba’s, Wavelab, Spectral Layers...), Grass Valley (Edius), Adobe... and no popular solution for inventory management with the same functional range than Windows is available.

There must be an inhibiting factor that count more than all the Linux user promises: Cashflow.

As a company you have to generate sales to pay your employees.

The experience and the environment with the Linux community speaks at least a different language: All that’s not for free and with visible source code cannot be trustful and worth a look...

To be clear: this is not valid to ALL Linux users and surely there will be an amount of users willing to buy.

Also the many different Linux distribution might be a brick...too much support...

For myself: Yes, I would support Serif if they make a Linux version and still I am waiting for other professional solutions come to this plattform. At least since these excruciating Windows 10 updates and upgrades and these massive quality problems. And there is a need of an alternative OS without cloud pressure and this SaaS thing...

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