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Guys, you are fooling yourselves.

In VFX / Proffesional 3D works linux is #1 !

 

Just look at "The foundry" they have modo/Mari/nuke and all their apps primarily builded for linux. Did you know Mari ??

 

Look also at Sidefx software (Houdini), 3D equalizer, black magic design, etc etc they all making a hell of money primarily with Linux !

 

Then, after that thing about one simple thing: on 10 graphic design people I know there are 6 to 8 would love jumping on Linux if photoshop (or a viable alternative) was on Linux. Well affinity is even a better alternative !!

 

Why ? Because when you work on productions, you work so hard than you need a perfect software tailored perfectly to your needs.

That's the first part, the second is your OS, and needs that too !! But Windows is on the opposite side of that. OSX is cooler but still, bloated too much of unnecessary things. Then, there's Linux, perfect there's even now Unreal Engine on Linux and we love Krita too ! But Krita needs some competition and I hope you'll be there.

 

Where's the donation page I'm sure you will get surprised...

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Why you forgot about Blender and Steam??? Blender is #1 modelling software in the world. You can see a lot of animations on Disney's main page which madeby Blender in Blender Foundation in Amsterdam. And Blender has all in one production pipline elements (sculpting, modelling, texture painting, shading, render engines, gaming, compositing, lighting, 2D and 3D Tracking, simulations and etc. Why you still don t want to improve Linux version??
And here is Steam. Steam has a small app which sells huge amount of games for Linux. You can make it for Linux, too. Just your your site, no need for Ubuntu markets or etc.

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Affinity itself is the wrong place to put the effort --- instead, pitch in on GNUstep, so that it can be used to compile and run Affinity Designer / Photo.

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Just registered to mention it ;)

 

I would immediately buy a suite to replace Photoshop & Indesign. Running it right now in a Windows VM, but that's a mess and not that fast. There's a need for that, and e.g. Scribus will not become useable the next 10 years ...

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I won't rule out making a Linux version of Affinity, but I need someone to show me a combination of distro, desktop topology and deployment (paid) platform where we would recoup our development costs. If someone can show me that, I'll be willing to talk some more about it all..

 

Hope this helps,

 

AndyS

 

That's not needed per se. The real-world modern way of doing this is through kickstater or similar.

Get a campaign going, mass publicize it, and ask for as much as you think you'll need, to build the linux version. "All the cool people are doing it."

If it works, you can keep doing campaigns every time you need to add something to it. So effectively this version of affinity becomes community funded all the way.

 

Krita has been doing this lately, and it works for them. Granted they ask for a lot less, but also they have a lot less to offer, so...

 

It's one way of doing it. :)

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Hello Developers/Everybody!

 

I will get right to my question first since I am digging up an old thread so to the developers are you aware of snap packages and the "one stop shop development" that can be done with them for the Linux users you have?

 

Here is some reading..... we all love reading:

 

https://insights.ubuntu.com/2016/06/14/universal-snap-packages-launch-on-multiple-linux-distros/

http://snapcraft.io/

http://electron.atom.io/

 

Now to understand where at least ONE of your Linux users are coming from I will give a bit of background on how I found your application, why I chose the beta, why I am not 100% sure I will purchase and what I do for work.

 

I am a web programmer by day and freelance design/develop by night. I run Linux 98% of the time in my household for a few reasons 1) its cheap for a household with 6+ computers and a dozen internet of things devices (as I donate when I can), 2) I program on it for work so daily use makes me better outside of my normal work environment (i.e. my sons movie format won't play), and 3) I enjoy the freedom and security inherent in the the OS.

 

Now I am not some snob nosed person and do have Windows 10 dual booted on my development laptop and my big desktop but I find they are only booted into for 1) Games that are not Linux supported (of which there are only two) and 2) Adobe Creative Cloud & now affinity. Many would argue that I should be just fine but I find it a MAJOR disadvantage for my workflow to have to completely drop to another OS to accomplish one task, design. 

 

People have mentioned Wine and other shitty options but if your going to do any serious work you can't use that and like others have said, you have a terminal on Mac (now Windows with the Conical help) but its still WAY overpriced on the hardware (Macs) and heavy (Windows).

 

I challenge you to reach out to the Linux community for support on packaging for snap packages or another option with a free to use limited option or trial option (nothing wrong with that!) and push to a market that is easy to dismiss but I am telling you were out there.... waiting.... just look at the Gimp forums.

 

Hands down I am ready to buy already but only if I can have the freedom to use it on whatever OS I choose.

 

- Lance

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texobyte,

 

Unless I'm missing something, snap is basically just a way to publish a "universal" Linux app package suitable for easy installation on different Linux distro's, right?

 

If so, Affinity would still have to write the code using the appropriate Linux API's where needed, figure out how to preserve cross-platform document file compatibility, & so on. This is not a trivial task, nor does it seem likely it is one justifiable economically, even considering the total Linux user base, regardless of the distro they use.


Affinity Photo 1.7.2, Affinity Designer 1.7.2, Affinity Publisher 1.7.2; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.2.153 & Affinity Designer 1.7.2.6 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iOS 12.3.1

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@R C-R,

 

Yes, but I think the whole idea is to give developers/companies,etc an answer to the often excuse of "Linux is too hard to develop for due to the amount of distro's". I don't think I can answer part two "smartly" but as MacOS is Unix based isn't some of the work done? (again I am quickly dropping off my knowledge here). 

 

@Fixx Interesting point but with the costs though.... whew!

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My best guess is that there will never be a Linux version. I am an ex Linux user and whilst I liked it I found the development cycle frustrating and I have forgotten how many times I heard - "this will be the year of the Linux desktop".

 

A missed opportunity or a model that does not fit the commercial world (desktop wise)? Probably both imo. But if I were a commercial enterprise I would think twice about investing time in an OS that has so many flavours most (if not all) of which could be here today and gone tomorrow.

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I have a computer in dual boot, Linux (Ubuntu 16.04) and Windows (10). Generally I use Linux, expecially for making websites, so for php, mysql, jquery etc. and for the graphic parts. Windows it is more for games that does not have a Linux version.

The bad thing is that GIMP it is not bad but it require more time then Photoshop. The first reason for not buying Photoshop is the absurd price (especially for a person like me that do websites and programming for hobby (and I don't like to use craked versions)). I have just download and tried Affinity. Seem the first program that I have seen that could compete with Photoshop and the price it is more reasonable.

I don't know if could be convenient for Serif the develop of a Linux version but I know that for me should be a very good motivation to buy it. It is possible that I'll buy the Windows version but I don't know; it is quite boring to have to switch the operative system to use it.

I don't know how many people could be interested in it and if could be convenient for Serif. For me should be a very good thing, so I hope for it.

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I have a computer in dual boot, Linux (Ubuntu 16.04) and Windows (10). Generally I use Linux, expecially for making websites, so for php, mysql, jquery etc. and for the graphic parts. Windows it is more for games that does not have a Linux version.

The bad thing is that GIMP it is not bad but it require more time then Photoshop. The first reason for not buying Photoshop is the absurd price (especially for a person like me that do websites and programming for hobby (and I don't like to use craked versions)). I have just download and tried Affinity. Seem the first program that I have seen that could compete with Photoshop and the price it is more reasonable.

 

I don't know if could be convenient for Serif the develop of a Linux version but I know that for me should be a very good motivation to buy it. It is possible that I'll buy the Windows version but I don't know; it is quite boring to have to switch the operative system to use it.

 

I don't know how many people could be interested in it and if could be convenient for Serif. For me should be a very good thing, so I hope for it.

Hi KaotikPaladin, 

 

Welcome to the forum.  :D

 

I completely ditched Windows when XP reached end of support. 

I have used many flavours of GNU/Linux, and now use LinuxMint (Rebecca) on my old 32 bit PC and use it as a home file server. 

 

I switched to Mac because of the need for commercial strength graphics applications. 

If Affinity decided to develop for GNU/Linux, I'd be interested in switching back to a GNU/Linux desktop environment – especially when my iMac (21.5-inch, Late 2012) becomes 'vintage' and won't work with whatever version of macOS leaves it behind! 

 

Paul. 

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Affinity creative products for Linux would be a huge step for Affinity. A lot of designers and artists are using Linux Distros. Ubuntu is the best distro as it has support for Wacom Tablets and is updated frequently. A common misconception is that people who are using Linux won't  pay for paid applications ,that's not true at all. If that was the case why had a lot of designers requested for a paid version of Photoshop for Linux,which was off course not developed ;) . Take 'LightWorks' as an example for paid apps,it is available for Windows,Mac and Linux as well for Video Post Production. Best way to address this is to have a poll and ask the community whether they want a version of affninity products for Linux.

 

You guys are doing a great job with the existing applications and improving them frequently. I think Linux version could be looked into after both Windows and Mac versions of the applications have parity,as you guys have a lot on the plate at the moment. Best of Luck with the Beta Versions especially the Windows version which on going.

 

 

Best Regards,

Fahad

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Best way to address this is to have a poll and ask the community whether they want a version of affinity products for Linux.

 

Thanks for your kind words. That would have to be a very large poll in order to satisfy this criterion


Patrick Connor
Serif (Europe) Ltd.

Latest releases on each platform 

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I have been using designer and photo on my Mac. Love the interface and the software itself. However, with new recent news about the Mac book pros changing a lot of their "design"(lack of escape keys and many other things). I decided that they(apple) no longer wants my business and so I will be moving to linux. I would gladly pay $100 bucks down if there's a Kickstarter to move affinity designer and photos onto linux(ubuntu). 

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I have been using designer and photo on my Mac. Love the interface and the software itself. However, with new recent news about the Mac book pros changing a lot of their "design"(lack of escape keys and many other things). I decided that they(apple) no longer wants my business and so I will be moving to linux. I would gladly pay $100 bucks down if there's a Kickstarter to move affinity designer and photos onto linux(ubuntu). 

No Escape key?  You are sadly mistaken.  Maybe there isn't a dedicated hard key but it is still there and can be easily implemented using the "fn" function button. And from everything that I've seen, you can customize the bar anyway so it offers  even more flexibility and productivity over any other operating system available. Maybe you should try it before you jump ship.

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mid0ri,

 

You do know that if you're put off buying a Mac that there is another choice of OS for which you will actually be able to get Affinity software any time soon... Windows, ;)

2010_exorcismus_001.jpg

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+1 But needs both Designer and Photo available for Linux ,I use a legit mac but i wont buy ever one again (iMac27) i would rather make a hackintosh 3-4 times better and for less of the price.
 

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+1 But needs both Designer and Photo available for Linux ,I use a legit mac but i wont buy ever one again (iMac27) i would rather make a hackintosh 3-4 times better and for less of the price.

Just FYI, "hackintosh" generally refers to a PC built with parts as compatible as possible with the Mac OS so it can run (in violation of Apple's licensing terms) a hacked copy of macOS or OS X. Because Apple uses some special parts that are not available to PC makers, compatibility is less that 100%.

 

Regardless, there would be no point in building a hackintosh if you are not going to run Apple's OS on it.


Affinity Photo 1.7.2, Affinity Designer 1.7.2, Affinity Publisher 1.7.2; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.2.153 & Affinity Designer 1.7.2.6 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iOS 12.3.1

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Hola.

 

Desarrollar una versión para GNU/Linux no creo que cueste $500,000, porque no sería un desarrollo desde cero, sino una adaptación.

 

La industria del desarrollo, diseño y del cine, por poner un ejemplo, están basándose, y cada vez en crecimiento, en los sistemas GNU/Linux, que es un Sistema Operativo con futuro, por ser robusto, fiable, accesible y contar con una enorme comunidad detrás aportando desarrollo y soluciones.

 

En cuanto al interés comercial de los desarrolladores de software, como es Affinity, haced un estudio de mercado serio y comprobaréis como la apuesta por GNU/Linux puede tener buenos resultados.

 

Saludos.

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We would only make a Linux version if we were confident we would recoup the $500,000 it would cost us to build it.

 

And how would you gauge that? You'd have to see serious inquiries for it?


 2012 Mac Book Pro 12”, 8GB RAM, Mojave  |  2017 iPad Pro 12.9” 256GB, iOS 12.4

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I need someone to show me a combination of distro, desktop topology and deployment (paid) platform where we would recoup our development costs. If someone can show me that, I'll be willing to talk some more about it all.

 

 
Here is an interesting web survey for OS preference by web developers.
 
Operating System Market Share as of 2016:
 
Windows: 52%
MacOS: 26%
Linux*: 14%
 
*) I'm only counting Ubuntu and Linux Mint, which are binary compatible, so that these numbers effectively represent one market.
 
 

We would only make a Linux version if we were confident we would recoup the $500,000 it would cost us to build it.

 
I'm not a statistician, but using the above numbers I would carefully guess that a Ubuntu (which implies Mint too) version would see a profit of 10% the amount you profit from the MacOS and Windows versions combined.
 
Linux users are idealistic people who gladly pay for something they approve of. For example, they structurally pay the most in pay-what-you-want schemes like the Humble Indy Bundle.

 

I'd say Linux users will gladly pay 150% of the MacOS version, resulting in a 15% profit compared to the Windows and MacOS versions combined.

 

Again, I'm not a statistician and I'm speculating. Develop at your own risk.  :lol:

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