Jump to content

Recommended Posts

1 minute ago, mvlad said:

Just popping in to say that was most definitely sarcasm.

Oh... language barrier or lonely neuron (my issues, I mean).


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/27/2019 at 7:33 AM, j0e.org said:

What are the big issues?

They have been discussed at great length in this long topic, but one of the biggest is Serif does not think it would be profitable enough to justify the investment.


Affinity Photo 1.7.2, Affinity Designer 1.7.2, Affinity Publisher 1.7.2; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.2.153 & Affinity Designer 1.7.2.6 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iOS 12.3.1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/5/2019 at 12:58 PM, R C-R said:

There is nothing in this long thread that has not been repeated over & over by multiple people. But despite that Serif has made it very clear that they have no plans to offer Linux versions.

And yet this thread exists to discuss this and they haven't locked it down even though they clearly said so. It's not because you are here parroting it that people will stop discussing this.

So instead of harassing people that would like to see their products on Linux, move on with your life. Or keep doing what you're doing. Draw more attention to it. I can only thank you for that.

FOSDEM happened very recently and Alan Pope made a presentation about the snap format:

 

To everyone interested in the package format instead of harassing Linux users that love Affinity products I think it's an interesting video.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Redsandro said:

For a lot of people, Windows is literally one piece of software away from being irrelevant.

Here we go again - this completely unquantified, unquantifiable "a lot".

No smart business makes investment commitments on the basis of such speculative, uninformed, questionable market estimates.

I wonder if Microsoft paid Affinity $500,000 to not make a Linux version.

Sarcasm or not, good grief. What possible logic is there to such a ridiculous speculation? Seriously - what does MS gain by doing something like that?

Has your tinfoil hat fallen off?

Linux zealots aren't "problem solvers" in my experience - just a bunch of selfish, disruptive, conspiracy theorist malcontents who are never happy, and who think the world owes them something.  

>:(


Keith Reeder

 

(I don't need bird photography lessons - OK..?)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Rosmaninho said:

To everyone interested in the package format instead of harassing Linux users that love Affinity products I think it's an interesting video.

Haven't you got that back-to-front? Linux zealots interminably banging on about what they want (and making up fairy stories about the viability of it), despite it being clear that it ain't happening, is far closer to harassment than anything written on here pushing back

"Linux users that love Affinity products" need to make a decision: which is more important to them? Their love of Affinity? Or their OS religious fundamentalism?


Keith Reeder

 

(I don't need bird photography lessons - OK..?)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/20/2019 at 7:36 PM, robertmsale said:

Affinity Photo and Designer run on the Universal Windows Platform, so there's a good chance much of it was written in C#.

No, it’s mostly written in C++:

 


Alfred online2long.gif
Affinity Designer/Photo/Publisher 1.7.2.471 • Windows 10 Home (4th gen Core i3 CPU)
Affinity Photo for iPad 1.7.2.153 • Designer for iPad 1.7.2.6 • iOS 12.4.1 (iPad Air 2)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/30/2019 at 12:35 PM, mvlad said:

I think that Serif should capitalize on the linux market as soon as they can before Adobe releases anything, for maximum profit

More irrelevant speculation based on nothing more than "I think...". "I want..."

All this noise about "the Linux market" - where is it? It'd make more sense for Serif to produce a Chromebook Affinity product, based on actual - and prospective - market share!

(And yes, I know what OS Chrome is based on...)

This article says all we need to know - maybe when this changes. Serif's opinion will: 

Quote

So, What Is Linux’s Market Share?

It’s impossible to say. There are just too many variations across too many pieces of technology to be able to accurately deduce any top-level figures.


Keith Reeder

 

(I don't need bird photography lessons - OK..?)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Keith Reeder said:

Haven't you got that back-to-front? Linux zealots interminably banging on about what they want (and making up fairy stories about the viability of it), despite it being clear that it ain't happening, is far closer to harassment than anything written on here pushing back

"Linux users that love Affinity products" need to make a decision: which is more important to them? Their love of Affinity? Or their OS religious fundamentalism?

Hate to be the "ackually" guy, but there is nothing religious about having a solid preference based on personal experiences and overall trends. I personally like linux more because I can personalize it more and I don't really have issues with updates (*cough* deleting the My Documents stuff with the october update, the overall mentality of Microsoft where they're more or less releasing beta-ish updates to the stable channel), nor do I get Candy Crush and Minecraft preinstalled with my linux distro.

Also, calling us linux zealots and our OS preference "religious fundamentalism" in order to demean our points only serves to show how close minded you yourself are, not in regards to operating systems or portability, but in regards to accepting other people's opinions as equally valid opinions as yours.


Mădălin Vlad
Graphic Designer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, Rosmaninho said:
On 2/5/2019 at 6:58 AM, R C-R said:

There is nothing in this long thread that has not been repeated over & over by multiple people. But despite that Serif has made it very clear that they have no plans to offer Linux versions.

And yet this thread exists to discuss this and they haven't locked it down even though they clearly said so.

No, they have not locked down the discussion. Why should they? This is the appropriate forum for suggestions of this kind to extend the Affinity range to yet another platform.

However, beating a dead horse will not bring it back to life.


Affinity Photo 1.7.2, Affinity Designer 1.7.2, Affinity Publisher 1.7.2; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.2.153 & Affinity Designer 1.7.2.6 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iOS 12.3.1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Keith Reeder said:

Seriously - what does MS gain by doing something like that?

Has your tinfoil hat fallen off?

Thank you for illustrating my point. Generally speaking, Linux users know what's going on and are better equipped to speculate on the market simply because it's relevant to their interests. Others may be a bit more oblivious to the workings because they simply buy a product and don't care that much else.

For Apple it's half their business model to keep everything exclusive. Or move things that way. Like that time they purchased popular on linux compositing software Shake and made it 10 times cheaper on Apple products, integrated into Final Cut and discontinued the multi platform version.

Microsoft similarly pays for exclusivity every now and then, but most particularly on games. Remember when PUBG became popular? Microsoft quickly purchased the exclusive rights to distribute. In the past they paid sums in the order of $50 million per year of exclusivity (see GTA episodes).

Speculating MS might have paid some "change" for Affinity's exclusivity is not tinfoil hat type speculation. It's plausible, and such speculation emerges when devs are requesting information on a target platform/distro/packaging/store, and once someone is giving a detailed answer, they say "never mind we are not doing this".

This behavior might be MS' last attempts at making things profitable. Because XBOX never made a profit. Most growing profit comes from Azure. After years of aggressive and at times comedic denial of Linux potential similar to some posts on these forums, even Microsoft is now embracing those "zealots". They paid billions for those "zealots". If you can't beat 'em, join 'em. Microsft Azure Sphere OS is going to be based on Linux. I won't be surprised if Microsoft's main Windows OS will be Linux-based in 10 years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Redsandro said:

@chakko007 @j0e.org I think the Linux folk around here are problem solvers and probably know the market better because of their network of Linux using professionals who are all searching for the same solution. At the same time, Windows users here are unbelievably fierce in wanting to have the last word with their unconstructive campaign of repeating a clear "NO" embedded in a nice warm lack of arguments while simultaneously pretending they don't care. I don't quite understand what motivates them so religiously in their calling to stifle any discussion and wishful arguments among Linux users. It's like Scott (Linux user) versus Dr. Evil (Windows user).

 

 

I really don't know if you're serious about this post (i really have a hard time figuring that out), but, there was a clear "No" from the Affinity developers, and, Linux users are once again not willing to accept that. Or any rational and economical argumentation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

@chakko007 since this thread "Affinity for Linux" is not locked down by the Affinity team, we are free to discuss Affinity for Linux. This includes target distro's, packaging, commercial store platform, sources of help and commercial support and even (in)compatibilities with WINE.

This way, if Affinity at some point in the future decides to revisit the idea, this thread would be a portfolio of information from Linux users who actually know things like SnapCraft, AppImage, FlatPack, Advanced Package Manager, commercial software on Linux, Canonical commercial support etc.

The only weird thing is that some users (including yourself) keep responding to everything with some variation of "The developers said NO so stop discussing it."

It's a bit ridiculous that we are being censored from discussing this any further. I mean what makes them so fanatic in their mission to stop this thread? Are they personally hurt by it? Are they afraid Affinity might change their mind? Why does it worry them? Are they feeling threatened by the idea that some day Affinity might want to reconsider? Why? What is threatening about it? Why do they care? Why not leave this topic alone if they are not going to contribute something new or interesting? It doesn't concern you. It's good to commit interesting points of view and arguments, but there is no rational contribution other than repeating again and again "DEVS SAID NO, PERIOD". So yes, I am being very serious when to me it's starting to look like Scott versus Dr. Evil, because every time Scott wants to make a rational point, Dr. Evil stops him from making it.

53 minutes ago, chakko007 said:

Linux users are once again not willing to accept (..) any rational and economical argumentation. 

I think you've got that backwards. They wanted to set up a crowdfunding campaign to see if it would be possible, and then the response was: "Even if you get the required $500,000, we are probably not going to develop a Linux version." So the crowdfund campaign was not started, and again we won't get the chance to find out.

The thing is, you think you know the market and we think we know the market. Everything is just underbelly feelings up to this point. But the benefit of the doubt definitely goes to the people who are in the market being discussed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The market is pretty obvious. Take a look at how many people in artistic professions use Linux. Take a look at the world wide distribution of Linux on home and work PC's. Take a look, analyze, and learn. I have issues believing Linux people really do that though, judging by how many of such threads surface online, where most of the Linux people are.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, chakko007 said:

Take a look at how many people in artistic professions use Linux.

This is an argument of infinite regress and doesn't tell us anything. In layman's terms: The chicken or the egg story.

28 minutes ago, chakko007 said:

Take a look at the world wide distribution of Linux on home and work PC's.

This is irrelevant. Team wanted to earn $500,000+. Crowdfund plans were made to raise $500,000+ by people who were confident it could be done. Then the team said never mind, we changed our minds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, so now that you've said that the most relevant things are irrelevant, what's left there to argue about? For Serif, the only thing that matters is how many people would buy their software. Even with $500.000 crowdfunding (which is a total laugh... ridiculous to believe they'd get that for a native Linux version), they'd still have to sell their software to the Linux people.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Rosmaninho said:

instead of harassing Linux users

Nobody is doing that.... I'd be harassing myself, lol....  (okay, that sounded reaaally weird)

6 hours ago, mvlad said:

Also, calling us linux zealots

Who did that ?  :o  Seriously, I want to know... I could  be called more of a linux zealot myself, as I do believe that they ( the other linux users showing up in these threads) should be (instead of , er, harassing a commercial company that produces ONLY closed code apps. To my knowledge) defending (as I do) more pure community open source software like the great Gimp, Scribus and Inkscape. And nope, this is not sarcasm (I'm a one-neuron kind of guy, can't afford sarcasm. Seriously, I'm probably the only one here liking those...). Simply, I believe Linux is MORE than just an escape from Windows (and Mac? why they always say just "from Windows"?)... We'd be missing its main spirit, and to me, personally, that'd be terribly sad. As I did believed once in what Linux is trying to do (still do, in certain way...But not sure if they have lost their track a bit)

6 hours ago, mvlad said:

accepting other people's opinions as equally valid opinions as yours.

I accept them. Fully. I agree with parts of them, even (I believe more than the vast majority of the Windows/Mac users). But "some" linux users need to be ready for debate, not for just posts praising their line of thought. A forum is a place for debate, not only for promotion fo something in one single direction.... Not agreeing with you, arguing, is not "harassing". Calling a debate like that is an attempt of censorship... and that is... UGLY, to say the least.

Quote

but in regards to accepting other people's opinions as equally valid opinions as yours.

Goes in both ways. I like to hear what you have to say. Trying to shut down other opinions like I'm sensing from the Linux side.. not cool.. (and wont happen, btw).

And I wouldn't be so sad/angry about here happening a debate. It helps keeping alive a thread that the staff could have very well chosen to close. They did not, despite that is the habit in other vendors when it is about a company statement and they don't move from their position. You would get waaay less bumps of the issue/matter if you would be able to effectively censorship us, as a bunch seems to be willing to.

Quote

Speculating MS might have paid some "change" for Affinity's exclusivity is not tinfoil hat type speculation

Oh....!

Quote

Just popping in to say that was most definitely sarcasm.

@mvlad  Then it was your statement who had sarcasm in it ? Man, Spanish is so much easier to detect these things..... :D 

Quote

@chakko007 since this thread "Affinity for Linux" is not locked down by the Affinity team, we are free to discuss Affinity for Linux.

Indeed ! We all are. Until further notice.

Quote

It's a bit ridiculous that we are being censored

I am finding more instances of some of the linux users telling the other side to shut up... No one (other than moderators, staff) should go in that direction... IMO.

Quote

I mean what makes them so fanatic in their mission to stop this thread?

Er...not my mission, I always want a healthy debate. In this, or other matters.

Quote

 Are they personally hurt by it? 

Er...nope... at all. That'd be an extremely difficult task to achieve, btw.  xD

In a more serious note. I'd LOVE that a Linux version painted a bit better financially. Indeed. I just don't see how. Till date, (one of the so many reasons (another is, just for fun) I don't want this thread closed) I have not seen any solid strategy (not in implementation and code -altho they don't know the code base, anyway- , or, ahem, just the installer. But commercially. Based on income reasons.)  with solid numbers to REALLY be somewhat effective in changing Serif's mind. And... I even think I'd be able to at least try to think of some !. But I have not lost my hope of something like that showing up. 

Quote

Canonical commercial support etc.

THAT would be a credible way. If someone has amazingly good contacts to make a certain set of meetings happen, etc. And had the confidence (sometimes translates as mountains of money, not some coins, like 500k) to convince whatever the investors or group that could be behind Serif (or the company itself). And I mean... Is not impossible ! We've seen things happening in one direction or another. No alliance surprises me anymore, in tech. If you'd speak in that line, I'd have more ears.... (nah, more than 2 is not aesthetic).

I'll keep making this FAQ post, answering your questions, that you seem to ask to the audience... :) 
 

Quote

Are they afraid Affinity might change their mind?

Absolutely not. iPad versions were done, had great success (mainly as they're greatly made, even if don't have an iPad Pro, just can sense it in YT videos, the touch gestures, etc) , and still, the desktop (I can only speak for the Windows version, would like to have a Mac machine)  apps, specially the current customer betas, absolutely rock, at least in my experience.
Plus, again, to make someone "afraid" of anything, tends to require a royal lot more than forum posts...

Quote

Why does it worry them?

Do you really think it worries us ? :o  I can only speak for me, but... really, not the case. I'm worried about a client telling me that the print company needs all remade now in a new size and format, and that's a ton of work... no room to worry about a forum post, lol...

Quote

Are they feeling threatened

For once and all... A bunch of us trying to get a realistic (specially in the ways to get the sustained (not a one-off) income they need for the project. You need to move away from the KS campaign as the sole solution, or we'll be stuck for ever)  discourse here, would LOVE a linux version. Even the mention of threat here is funny, or just ... a bit out of place, sorry.

Quote

Why not leave this topic alone

(the real censorship attempt strikes again)  Oh, do you really want us to do so ? We can do that. Then it'd get the eventual bumps like other people wanting their particular feature implemented (dxf, tga, arrow heads (already in beta), better raw editing (already improvements in a beta), raster auto tracing, etc.... ). I guarantee that's a TON less of visibility (and traffic, post views, and "weight", and...) than what you are getting now. But hey, what do I know, I only worked with marketing departments for some decades. And yep, not wanting any interaction, just religious praise (btw, religious is not a bad adjective or term... fanatic or fanaticism is)  is a bit "fanatic" itself. But rights-wise, we have the same rights than you to post, sorry.

Quote

 repeating again and again "DEVS SAID NO, PERIOD"

We're saying a lot more than that. Well, I am. And about repetition... *cough*.
 

Quote

, Dr. Evil stops him from making it.

Untrue. Nobody stops you from saying anything. You want SILENCE, censorship on the other side... Admit it, we'd be clear on what are we really talking about....
 

Quote

Even if you get the required $500,000,

The problem I see with the 500k number is: Besides I don't know if that would really cope with the needed investment (not just coders, is all... licenses, marketing, etc. Many expenses involved. I've worked at CLOSED source software developers (btw, many years at an open source related one, too), and...it's always really bigger numbers. That only sounds big for a bedroom coder kind of project...), is that... is not laid any plan to demonstrate it'd gain more money than same effort, resources and personal put to work in say, the Windows, Mac OS and iOS platform. Specially when their plate of work is already pretty full.... You think I'm "harassing" you. Besides I'd never do that (leaving aside that I have zero motivation for it)  I indeed am very curious for any serious proposal / idea in that line. (money, income. A plan.).


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, chakko007 said:

For Serif, the only thing that matters is how many people would buy their software

Serif has to worry about much more than that, though the number of sales is certainly a large factor in it.

As we've said before, adding a new OS means increasing the staffing to develop a version of 3 applications for that OS and also increasing the staffing to support the new versions. That is a long-term cost, not a one-time item.

Beyond that, because all 3 or 4 versions of each application should interoperate, and the 3 applications should interoperate with each other, they have to plan how to coordinate the simultaneous development and testing of future new versions of each application.

I suspect that the coordination effort has turned out to be larger than Serif expected, and may be a major factor in their decision not to do a Linux version at this time. But that's just my guess; I don't recall seeing any comments from Serif about that.

 


-- Walt

Windows 10 Home, version 1903 (18362.239), 16GB memory, Intel Core i7-6700K @ 4.00Gz, GeForce GTX 970
Affinity Photo 1.7.2.471 and 1.7.3.476 Beta   / Affinity Designer 1.7.2.471 and 1.7.3.476 Beta  / Affinity Publisher 1.7.2.471 and 1.7.3.475 Beta

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, SrPx said:

Who did that ? :o Seriously, I want to know... 

6 hours ago, Keith Reeder said:

Haven't you got that back-to-front? Linux zealots interminably banging on about what they want (and making up fairy stories about the viability of it), despite it being clear that it ain't happening, is far closer to harassment than anything written on here pushing back

 

 


Mădălin Vlad
Graphic Designer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is anecdotal. In two decades of working with web/graphic/screen/game designers and developers (both Europe and North America) and teaching thousands of students from all over the globe, I perhaps saw a handful of Linux users. In the past five years I haven't encountered any student in a digital design related program using Linux.

It's either Mac or Windows for the by far majority of these type of users, simple as that. Young design students just do not see Linux as an alternative. I have had trouble enough to get them to try open source alternatives like Krita!

That's not saying I would not like to see Adobe and Affinity release their software on Linux, far from that. I think if they would, Linux would become a more attractive choice for a certain sub-set of designers. I would make the switch, for example. But the fact is, no-one I've ever met and worked with in graphic/screen/mobile/web design related fields worked with the Linux platform. And I myself am very much the exception: barring one or two people, I haven't spoken to any designers who would even consider the switch to Linux (most don't even know what "Linux" is!).

I agree it's a bit of the chicken and the egg problem. But that doesn't take away the issue that the Linux desktop space is tiny compared to Windows and Mac, and the fact that the desktop/laptop design folks prefer Mac and Windows. Or that the Linux desktop space is so terribly fragmented. Even Linus admitted last year (more or less) that Linux as a desktop platform is its own worst enemy because of the fragmentation. As has been mentioned earlier in this thread, it would make more sense to invest in a ChromeOS version.

Linux in various shapes and forms is super-wide adopted all over the world in many situations, far more than either Windows or Mac; except for mainstream desktop users and certainly not in the world of graphic/web/general design.

Tiny adoption rate as a platform & tiny subset of target users  = no hope in heck to earn back your investment over a semi-long term.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Medical Officer Bones said:

This is anecdotal. In two decades of working with web/graphic/screen/game designers and developers (both Europe and North America) and teaching thousands of students from all over the globe, I perhaps saw a handful of Linux users. In the past five years I haven't encountered any student in a digital design related program using Linux.

It's either Mac or Windows for the by far majority of they type of users, simple as that. Young design students just do not see Linux as an alternative. I have had trouble enough to get them to try open source alternatives like Krita!

That's not saying I would not like to see Adobe and Affinity release their software on Linux, far from that. I think if they would, Linux would become a more attractive choice for a certain sub-set of designers. I would make the switch, for example. But the fact is, no-one I've ever met and worked with in graphic/screen/mobile/web design related fields worked with the Linux platform. And I myself am very much the exception: barring one or two people, I haven't spoken to any designers who would even consider the switch to Linux (most don't even know what "Linux" is!).

I agree it's a bit of the chicken and the egg problem. But that doesn't take away the issue that the Linux desktop space is tiny compared to Windows and Mac, and the fact that the desktop/laptop design folks prefer Mac and Windows. Or that the Linux desktop space is so terribly fragmented. Even Linus admitted last year (more or less) that Linux as a desktop platform is its own worst enemy because of the fragmentation. As has been mentioned earlier in this thread, it would make more sense to invest in a ChromeOS version.

Linux in various shapes and forms is super-wide adopted all over the world in many situations, far more than either Windows or Mac; except for mainstream desktop users and certainly not in the world of graphic/web/general design.

Tiny adoption rate as a platform & tiny subset of target users = no hope in heck to earn back your investment over a semi-long term.

How would regular people know if they prefer mac and windows over linux if they can't even check out linux precisely because there is no professional design software on it?


Mădălin Vlad
Graphic Designer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, mvlad said:

 

 

Oh, I didn't know. Well, that's one instance.... I have not used the term. Nor anything similar.


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, mvlad said:

How would regular people know if they prefer mac and windows over linux if they can't even check out linux precisely because there is no design software on it?

They wouldn't. And Linux HAS design software that is very good (like Krita). But barring David Revoy, I haven't seen masses of digital painters move to Linux. He is the exception to the rule. I have seen quite a few digital painters move to Krita, but stay with their OS.

In my experience, the availability of (niche) software by itself is probably not a major or viable reason to switch to a different OS platform. Much more is needed than that to make the switch (whether from Mac to Windows, from Windows to Mac, or from those to any Linux variant).

When Affinity Photo was released for the Mac, many Windows users lamented the fact that it wasn't available for their OS. How many of these users made the switch to the Mac platform just because Affinity was available? Right, a negligible number, if any worth mentioning. Instead, they waited until it became available for their Windows platform.

Software doesn't seem to be a major driving factor to switch to a different OS for designers, or most mainstream users. If it were, graphic designer wouldn't care about the platform they work on, but reality tells us something very different: Mac is preferred. So other reasons take precedence.

Thinking that the availability of Affinity would increase Linux adoption rates across mainstream desktop users or artists/designers is most probably an oversimplification of a much more complex set of real-world factors. I don't think it would make even a small dent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PS the Linux users here probably resolutely refuse to switch to either Mac or Windows just to gain access to Adobe or Affinity design software. Instead, like the Windows users before, they ask for a version for THEIR platform of choice. Which sort-of proves my previous point: software by itself generally does not drive users to leave their OS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, mvlad said:

How would regular people know if they prefer mac and windows over linux if they can't even check out linux precisely because there is no professional design software on it?

I'd be to believe that the issue runs deeper than that. I have tried my entire family (and several friends) to use Linux, believe it or not. NONE are graphic artists. Even more, they don't even make anything graphic, at all (u know, they could make the eventual meme, a family photo edit... not even that).  They dislike the other apps available for specific (non graphic) professional area , or just regular office work (and yeah, I do love Libre Office, is what I have installed (windows version), solely...But they definitely don't love it) , they dislike (their words were often WAY stronger) also that they find the OS much harder to use than Windows and Mac. I'm repeating what they tell/have told me, trust me. And that counting on that I made step by step  tuts with them, teaching how to use things. It doesn't matter, once they're alone with it, they find some obstacle that they remember they had it solved easily in Windows (or Mac)  and end of story. Next phone call is for me to come to their house, have some coffee with biscuits, but pretty plueaze, remove that Mint, Ubuntu, whatever, and re-install their Windows. Am tired of doing that. I lately was only doing it for avoiding them the 140 bucks expense. Not even having that motivation, either. If I'd "hate" Linux, I'd push hard in them not even having the thought of trying and using Linux. I mean, would I have ever installed one single distro. And I have NO ISSUES with Linux, I need to say. I think even the distros of 10 years ago were already very easy to handle, let alone today's. But one thing is the geek, other the average jane and joe.


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Medical Officer Bones said:

Software doesn't seem to be a major driving factor to switch to a different OS

For me it is. If We had ALL (not just Affinity suite, lol....) what we have on Windows, in Linux, I'd have zero probs in moving. One of the biggest issues is the market standards. You go to a job interview, and they don't want you to handle Davinci Resolve, Fusion.  They don't care if you are an ace with Scribus. They want you to master in and out InDesign.They want you to be an absolute expert with Premiere and After Effects. In freelancing, there's more room. But again, you are constantly facing the wall. You get into projects where other freelancer or company intervened, made part of the job, or provided files to start from. And they'll be industry standard native files. Often not something u can open 1:1 in non industry standard apps. Being very often a critical issue. A show stopper.


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×