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adney

Which sites offer vector graphics in Jpegs and EPS formats

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Hi @adney,

Welcome to the forums. 

Jpeg is a raster format, not a Vector one. You would need either PDF, EPS or SVG for vector work. As for the website, we do not supply any additional content. You would have to look at 3rd party resources.  

Thanks,

Gabe.

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okay. thank you for the help, can you help me with one more question 

Where can I find affordable vector patterns? shutterstock is too expensive and also most of the site, I want to buy patterns in bulk. 

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Hey Guys !
I would recommend you check in the forum link below and see if it fits with what you are looking for.

Blessings !


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On 7/21/2018 at 2:19 PM, adney said:

Where can I find affordable vector patterns? shutterstock is too expensive and also most of the site, I want to buy patterns in bulk. 

What's your definition of 'affordable'? What kind of 'bulk' purchase do you have in mind?


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I use Pixabay.com (which has 100% free JPEG's and vectors) Here is a link to their vectors: https://pixabay.com/en/photos/?q=&image_type=vector&cat=&min_height=&min_width=&order=

I also use Freepik.com, which has a small monthly fee, or is free if you give credit to them: https://www.freepik.com/

Apparently freepik.com is NOT to be confused with freepix.com :2_grimacing:


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On 19. Juli 2018 at 2:59 PM, adney said:

vector graphics in Jpegs

FYI: JPGs can contain vector paths.

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So far, freepik.com seems like the best deal to me for vector art.  They do also list Shutterstock items as sponsored products, but they seem to have plenty available under their own free and premium plans.

My first two downloads each contained an EPS and a JPG.  One of these was a sheet that contained a couple dozen vector shapes, but easy enough to select the one I wanted and paste that into a new document.

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5 hours ago, Oval said:

FYI: JPGs can contain vector paths.

Not exactly true.

While Adobe abuses a metadata field to include vector path information, this has never been a standard feature of the JPEG standard or accepted implementations. It's an Adobe-specific customisation (which is why "Save for web" from Photoshop strips out the path information for compatibility).

  • ITU T.81 - the standard on which JPEG files are based
  • ECMA TR/98 - the generally accepted implementation of the JPEG standard for .jpg/.jpeg files (JPEG/JFIF)

For completeness, here is a starting point for JPEG/EXIF, another implementation using the JPEG compression standard, mainly used by some cameras.

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21 hours ago, obtusity said:

Not exactly true.

So what exactly is not true in our statement “JPGs can contain vector paths”?! A very big part of the communications industry uses vector paths included in JPG files. You have rules in many areas. But beginners should be informed about the reality. In some situations “broken rules” make sense    e v o l u t i o n   and most designers are not interested in technical stuff that doesn’t explain why software cannot cope with files from PS etc.

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1 hour ago, Oval said:

In some situations “broken rules” make sense ...

That makes a whole lot of sense, particularly for companies that break them to suppress competition. Microsoft once did this by leveraging its monopoly to create de facto "standards" that could only be implemented fully in its proprietary Windows OS. It eventually got into a lot of trouble for that, which is probably why Adobe was careful to use private metadata to create what is in effect yet another de facto standard without actually violating the official standards.

But that aside, the most compelling reason for not breaking the rules is it leads to a chaos of incompatible standards, & it can take years to resolve thorny legal issues concerning what is proprietary, who owns what, & who owes licensing fees to whom.


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2 hours ago, Oval said:

So what exactly is not true in our statement “JPGs can contain vector paths”?! A very big part of the communications industry uses vector paths included in JPG files.

I think I've read in these forums about JPEG files that contain "clipping paths". Is that what you're referring to?  If not, what is the process that the communications industry uses to create JPEG files that contain vector paths?


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2 hours ago, walt.farrell said:

I think I've read in these forums about JPEG files that contain "clipping paths". Is that what you're referring to?  If not, what is the process that the communications industry uses to create JPEG files that contain vector paths?

I think they are effectively the same thing, but if you do a web search on "JPG clipping paths" you will get lots of hits with relevant info, including many that explain the steps needed to create them in Photoshop, & several that in effect suggest they are best used in an all-Photoshop, or at least all-Adobe, working environment.


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10 hours ago, walt.farrell said:

I think I've read in these forums about JPEG files that contain "clipping paths". Is that what you're referring to?  If not, what is the process that the communications industry uses to create JPEG files that contain vector paths?

Hi walt,
Yes, they support and that's what Oval is referring to. Affinity Designer/Photo already supports them. To use clipping paths in Affinity Designer/Photo and export as JPG's do the following:

  1. open the image you want 
  2. create the clipping path with the Pen Tool as usual (make sure it's then filled with a color - any color will do)
  3. drag the path layer over the thumbnail of the image layer in the Layers panel (you should see a small vertical blue line appear when you drag the path layer over the thumbnail of the image layer - drop it at that point. You have nested the path to the image layer.
  4. click the thumbnail of the path layer in the Layers panel to select it, then double-click on the path layer again to give it a name - fill in the name you want (you need to do this so you can later select this path in InDesign/Photoshop)
  5. go to File Export select JPG, set the options you want as usual, then click the More button and tick Convert clips to paths. Export the file.

You will find the clipping path(s) in the Paths panel if you open the JPG in Adobe Photoshop. Conversely JPG's with clipping paths saved in Photoshop will open as vector masks nested to the image layer in Affinity Designer/Photo.

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6 minutes ago, MEB said:

4. click the thumbnail of the path layer in the Layers panel to select it, then double-click on the path layer again to give it a name - fill in the name you want (you need to do this so you can later select this path in InDesign/Photoshop)

Aha! I had seen naming the path mentioned as a necessary step in Photoshop for its JPEG exports to include the clipping path (as well as avoiding the 'export for web' option), but I never made the connection for the need to do the same thing in Designer or Photo. I don't personally use any Adobe products besides their DNG converter, but it is something I will try to remember for the (rare for me) times when I might share a JPEG with someone who does. Thanks for the tip!


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