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voba

Colors aren't matching at PDF Export in Affinity Designer

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Once I color in objects in a layout and export it to a PDF, the colors don't match anymore. E.g. a CMYK with 100%K turns into a mixed black with all CMYK colors. Or a 100%C turns into a 97%C and 4%M.

It's always been an easy way for me to check a PDF in Photoshop and look for the colors. See attached video.

That makes Affinity Designer not really reliable for print. Any thoughts?

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How did you pick 100%k?

What is the document color set to? What is the color profile used in the document and for exporting the PDF?

I get the same colors as designed with.

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Hi MikeW, thanks for your reply!

 

You gave the right hint! I found the problem.

The document color profile was CMYK ISO Coated v2 300% (ECI).

The export color profile was CMYK Coated FOGRA27.

Affinity Designer seems to adjust the colors while converting into the exported different color profile. Using the same color profile in the document and export made the colors match in the PDF.

 

Indesign has a different behavior and that's what I got used to. The colors still match, no matter what color profile you export it. But now that I know how Affinity Designer behaves, it's easy to handle it.

Again, thank you very much!

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16 minutes ago, voba said:

Hi MikeW, thanks for your reply!...

You're welcome!

Affinity products could stand a bit more "ID-like" output color options. That could go a long way to ensuring people are getting color as designed. And likely a bit more of an explanation in the Help to describe the what & why & ramifications of the choices.

Mike

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This is something I came across early on - and have never had these problems in THE ADOBE, my workaround is to always start a job using the same colour profile, in general I'll stick to Fogra27 - the shitter is if I you start a job using another profile say Fogra39 and set a bunch of colours say a rich black (20C 20M 20Y 100K) and a standard black (0C 0M 0Y 100K) then copy paste your artwork into a document with blacks set exactly the same, set in Fogra27 your rich black will be 75C 74M 59Y 87K and your standard 100% black will change to 77C 73M 58Y 82K even if you have them setup as global colours even resetting the colour profile to Fogra39 once your work is in place will leave the colours wrong - this is where select same colour would come in handy - I've now just got into the habit of sticking to one colour profile Fogra27 and have had no problems so far - my usual 4 colour offset print provider always insist on :ISO coated v2 300% (ECI) which I change on creating a PDF/X-4 for print, which have always come out looking nice and punchy and don't look that different to similar jobs supplied in InDesign 


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17 minutes ago, xman said:

David didn't go into it, but there are other issues with determining color properly in versions 10 up to the latest Acrobat DC (either a release or two ago or maybe just the very latest. I think I saw it was fixed anyway). That is, it is possible to get Acrobat to actually lie about the numbers under certain conditions and even the Object Inspector will perpetuate that lie. This doesn't cause anything more than a moment of consternation if one is aware of it happening.

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@MikeW thanks for your additional info. It not easy as far as I found to consistently determine the correct cmyk color with a simple and free app/tool. I looked into a few while trying to use only open source software and non adobe software. Krita.org supports cmyk as does scribes.net, but not sure if that is the best way to check honestly.

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You're welcome, X.

There really are only two "affordable" means of checking color and those are Acrobat & pdfToolbox (who makes the preflight routines for Adobe Acrobat). The only other options are true RIP software, some of which cost so much they cost more than a new car (and not a cheap car). It's a bummer, but no third-party PDF Editor maker has stepped forward to compete in that space.

I have both, though I stopped upgrading Acrobat with Acrobat XI. I do keep pdfToolbox updated. Neither of these applications are needed if one is certain of the color workflow from beginning to end. But as I get a lot of PDFs for publication purposes, they are a must for me.

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Yeah it is sad. Will check out pdfToolbox. But your right if your in control everything it's should be fine to skip those tools. I've never had a color issue when having booklets and other marketing materials printed from scribes or inkscape. May still need scribus (think indesign) for now.

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I always open the PDF in Photoshop, check the embedded color profile and hover over the colors and check the CMYKs in the "info" window. I always felt that it's a reliable way to approve the PDF-file before it goes to print. I don't have Acrobat or other PDF programs. 

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