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Using the Dodge and burn on a mask layer is handy when using to affect only shadows, midtones or highlights. Eg. Dodging a lighter sky through a dark tree.

Tx


Dave Straker

Cameras: Sony A7R2, RX100V

Computers: Win10: Chillblast Photo with i7-3770 + 16Gb RAM + Philips 40in 4K; Surface Pro 4 i5

Favourite word: Aha. For me and for others.

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Just create a luminosity mask for a painted overlay blend layer. Duplicate the image, use curves to bring the manipulation desired tonal range to white, and the manipulation undesired range to black, and rasterize to mask, giving you much more fine control and non-destructiveness than a generic  shadows mid tones highlights dodge/burn toggle.

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Hey Patriot,

Thanks for the input, but you dare putting a "Just" in front of your multiple steps process? :D:10_wink:
"rasterize to mask" will anyway produce a destructive result.

Would you mind providing us a quick screen record? There are some formulations I'm missing here.
Thanks in advance. 


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OK.  I guess I used "just" in terms of being a sequence of simple clicks, relative to more complicated and time consuming things like cloning, retouching, relighting and painting. 

I guess you do have a point in that Rasterize to mask is a destructive action, however, in spirit, but not tecnicality, this procedure is non destructive.  Rasterize to mask is destructive in the sense that the tonal range that is being selected to be masked is frozen, but the actual painting that is the dodge and burn is non destructive as it is on a separate overlay blend layer from the picture, that can be erased and repainted different colors or tones, and the opacity can be  raised and lowered.  Definitely more non destructive than dodging and burning directly onto the original image, or having to duplicate it. 

Also, doing a bilateral blur on the mask with a high radius and a threshold of about 20-30, to blur the fine details but preserve contrasty edges on the mask is helpful to preserve details if you are very aggressively lifting shadows or lowering highlights (lowering contrast) in the dodge/burn you are applying.  This is only worthwhile with extreme dodge . burning that for HDR/ lifting shadows or lowering highlights , however.

Anyway, here's a video I made using this technique for quick  manual deep shadows lifting / subtle hdr look, no audio.

 

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Hey Generic Patriot,

Thanks for the video.
Your process is interesting, but finally, it validates what I was afraid of.
In your explanation/video, you are considering your mask as good by default, and then, you apply your effect (dodge or whatever) to the result masked image.

What we are talking about is totally different: Applying dogding, burning, level, curve, etc. directly on the mask is all about refining it (the mask), and nothing else.
The HUGE benefit of working directly on the mask is that you see in live, how it behave on your creation as you edit it.
Let say your mask has slight grey areas. Those area will act as partially transparent on the masked image right? In your example, you can over paint whatever you want, in whatever blending mode, you'll still get those areas partially transparent. This is exactly not what we want. We want to be able to fix those areas, which can be defects on the mask. And to do so, you may want the doge / burn depending the need, specific areas of your mask to make it perfect.

Starting at 1min. on this video I've made years ago… (was still on Photoshit), you'll exactly see the benefit I'm talking about. I'm working right into my mask, and burn it.
This method provides insanely precise results when applicable. And I've endless count of case like this. At least, Photoshop logic was good on this… (the very only feature I'm missing)…


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On 7/13/2018 at 12:18 AM, Tazintosh said:

What we are talking about is totally different: Applying dogding, burning, level, curve, etc. directly on the mask is all about refining it (the mask), and nothing else.
The HUGE benefit of working directly on the mask is that you see in live, how it behave on your creation as you edit it.
Let say your mask has slight grey areas. Those area will act as partially transparent on the masked image right? In your example, you can over paint whatever you want, in whatever blending mode, you'll still get those areas partially transparent. This is exactly not what we want. We want to be able to fix those areas, which can be defects on the mask. And to do so, you may want the doge / burn depending the need, specific areas of your mask to make it perfect.

Would love this feature. 

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