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My Adobe resignation. Anyone else packed it in with them?

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2 hours ago, MikeW said:

Sure...

Most cost effective is...?

Maybe the discounts they offer from time to time, like the one I linked to, in June? Many great typefaces had 85%+ discounts.

Best regards!


You'll never know what you can do until you get it up as high as you can go!   

AMD FX 8350 :: Radeon HD 7870 :: Windows 10 ::  http://mithferion.deviantart.com/

Oxygen Icons :: Free Quality Fonts :: Public Domain Pictures :: iOS 11 Design Resources :: iOS App Icon Template :: Hot to do High Quality Art :: Mesh Warp / Distort Tool Considerations

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4 hours ago, αℓƒяє∂ said:

even if Fontspring lacks in terms of some of the most recognized and legendary fonts, they are the only ones that offer the cheapest alternative to Frutiger, in the form of Graphein Pro (more like a carbon copy, but I don't complain).

Best regards!


You'll never know what you can do until you get it up as high as you can go!   

AMD FX 8350 :: Radeon HD 7870 :: Windows 10 ::  http://mithferion.deviantart.com/

Oxygen Icons :: Free Quality Fonts :: Public Domain Pictures :: iOS 11 Design Resources :: iOS App Icon Template :: Hot to do High Quality Art :: Mesh Warp / Distort Tool Considerations

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1 hour ago, BrianHermelijn said:

Since there is this thread, a question to everyone. How will you apply to a company, if you're exclusively only using Photoshop / Illustrator? 

Do you mean if the company is exclusively Adobe products? Being versed in Adobe products is really the only means of having a chance in that scenario. 

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Yeah. Because its not like Affinity is bad, but at the same time, its hard to simply ditch Adobe products, because its still the main stream software/widely used. Will still use AD, personal projects mainly, unless of course I get into a company that has AD too, which would be a huge plus. But that's unlikely, especially where I am from. 

@MikeW

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Anyway, with enough experience -specially in previous jobs or many years as a freelancer- is not as if you are going to forget your training (have been using ps at jobs since 95, is not like I'm gonna forget how to use the layers)  , neither that the software evolution is as crazy as not being enough to see the new stuff in a trial once a year, to keep up to date with the few features added in whatever the app...

So, despite the fact that yep, at any job you are likely going to use Adobe (or  Max / Maya in 3D, etc) (I've happen to have had all sort of situations, tho) I don't see the problem here: It does not collide with having Affinity at home and using it for whatever is your hobby, side project, freelancing, or own business, etc. Or using it in the companies that let you choose (it happens sometimes).

Learning more UIs makes your profile stronger, not weaker. Yes, u need Adobe if you go for getting a job in the industry, but is definitely not going to hurt (for some companies wishing to save bucks in some seats, might be seen as an strong advantage, seen it happening with Blender, inkscape, video tools, and other stuff) that you can add to your resume that you can as well use Affinity AD and AP, and/or even that you own a license.


AD, AP and APub.  Ryzen 9 3900X, 32 GB RAM, GTX 1650 4GB, 500GB m.2 SSD, 1TB HDD 7200rpm. Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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It's possibly that you misunderstood what I meant. As long a software is industry standard still, a company isn't going to change "for one" individual that uses Affinity Software. I am not stating Affinity has no chance, because I love it, and I want it to become an industry standard, right.

But in our current state, unless you find one of those companies that is open, to try new tools, its unlikely for them to hire someone that is not willing to adapt or knows about Adobe products (yet) And yes, you can add both on your CV (which is what I am doing), but hopefully in the foreseeable future, companies become more open about what software the creator uses. 

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52 minutes ago, BrianHermelijn said:

It's possibly that you misunderstood what I meant. As long a software is industry standard still, a company isn't going to change "for one" individual that uses Affinity Software. I am not stating Affinity has no chance, because I love it, and I want it to become an industry standard, right.

But in our current state, unless you find one of those companies that is open, to try new tools, its unlikely for them to hire someone that is not willing to adapt or knows about Adobe products (yet) And yes, you can add both on your CV (which is what I am doing), but hopefully in the foreseeable future, companies become more open about what software the creator uses. 

Give it time. I just finished teaching 16-19 year olds and before I left I introduced them to Affinity P+D. Adobe seats cost a fortune for education (The discounts are not very good at all btw), so they removed the need for 30 seats, bought Affinity to replace those and used the £1,000's for other software. Students will thus be using both Adobe and Affinity before they go out into the workplace.

As more and more come through the system the chances are that companies will also start to adapt as they will not have to worry about (to them) a step into the unknown away from Adobe, incurring training costs etc

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Yeah, what till... wrote.

Brian, when I was hiring as a small shop, I cared more about familiarity than expertise, trainable than immediate production, positive personality than hesitant during an interview. 

So be versed in what the shops expect. You don't need to be an expert. 

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Edited --- It was a  too long post. I removed it myself :)


AD, AP and APub.  Ryzen 9 3900X, 32 GB RAM, GTX 1650 4GB, 500GB m.2 SSD, 1TB HDD 7200rpm. Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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Edited --- It was a  too long post. I removed it myself :)


AD, AP and APub.  Ryzen 9 3900X, 32 GB RAM, GTX 1650 4GB, 500GB m.2 SSD, 1TB HDD 7200rpm. Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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Last but not least, as also happened to me in some situations: Some companies have...NONE . Some companies, ie, some software developers,  or web making firms (getting to be the same these days...) not necessarily just-created start-ups, even older small business that always outsourced art to some external studio (that's expensive, at least depending ONLY in that, with no one in-house, reason why often end up finally getting someone permanently in the staff) happen to have NO PREFERENCE, and indeed, no actual tool purchased. They are contracting you as an art director, the one who knows about this, often also as one man/woman band, no one else in the area. You get to advice about the tools. I had to do so in a pair of places, and back then was hard. Today would be extremely easy: Just Affinity (and other brands in other types of software, there's more alternatives now than ever).


AD, AP and APub.  Ryzen 9 3900X, 32 GB RAM, GTX 1650 4GB, 500GB m.2 SSD, 1TB HDD 7200rpm. Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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No prob. Removed the posts  :)


AD, AP and APub.  Ryzen 9 3900X, 32 GB RAM, GTX 1650 4GB, 500GB m.2 SSD, 1TB HDD 7200rpm. Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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6 hours ago, SrPx said:

No prob. Removed the posts  :)

Some of us might actually want to read your interesting and well-informed posts, but it’s a lot of scrolling for those who can’t be bothered! Perhaps the answer is to sandwich the text between ‘spoiler’ tags; i.e. putting

[spoiler]

at the beginning and

[/spoiler]

at the end. Then it will appear like the example below, and anyone who wants to read it just needs to click on the header of the collapsed box. (‘Props’ to @Bri-Toon for the method.)

 

Sed ut perspiciatis unde omnis iste natus error sit voluptatem accusantium doloremque laudantium, totam rem aperiam, eaque ipsa quae ab illo inventore veritatis et quasi architecto beatae vitae dicta sunt explicabo. Nemo enim ipsam voluptatem quia voluptas sit aspernatur aut odit aut fugit, sed quia consequuntur magni dolores eos qui ratione voluptatem sequi nesciunt. Neque porro quisquam est, qui dolorem ipsum quia dolor sit amet, consectetur, adipisci velit, sed quia non numquam eius modi tempora incidunt ut labore et dolore magnam aliquam quaerat voluptatem. Ut enim ad minima veniam, quis nostrum exercitationem ullam corporis suscipit laboriosam, nisi ut aliquid ex ea commodi consequatur? Quis autem vel eum iure reprehenderit qui in ea voluptate velit esse quam nihil molestiae consequatur, vel illum qui dolorem eum fugiat quo voluptas nulla pariatur?


Alfred online2long.gif
Affinity Designer/Photo/Publisher 1.7.3.481 • Windows 10 Home (4th gen Core i3 CPU)
Affinity Photo for iPad 1.8.2.174 • Designer for iPad 1.8.2.4 • iPadOS 13.5.1 (iPad Air 2)

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21 minutes ago, αℓƒяє∂ said:

Perhaps the answer is to sandwich the text between ‘spoiler’ tags

  Reveal hidden contents

Sed ut perspiciatis unde omnis iste natus error sit voluptatem accusantium doloremque laudantium, totam rem aperiam, eaque ipsa quae ab illo inventore veritatis et quasi architecto beatae vitae dicta sunt explicabo. Nemo enim ipsam voluptatem quia voluptas sit aspernatur aut odit aut fugit, sed quia consequuntur magni dolores eos qui ratione voluptatem sequi nesciunt. Neque porro quisquam est, qui dolorem ipsum quia dolor sit amet, consectetur, adipisci velit, sed quia non numquam eius modi tempora incidunt ut labore et dolore magnam aliquam quaerat voluptatem. Ut enim ad minima veniam, quis nostrum exercitationem ullam corporis suscipit laboriosam, nisi ut aliquid ex ea commodi consequatur? Quis autem vel eum iure reprehenderit qui in ea voluptate velit esse quam nihil molestiae consequatur, vel illum qui dolorem eum fugiat quo voluptas nulla pariatur?

Top tip!


---

Dan Robinson  |  Giant Lobster Productions Ltd

Web: giantlobster.uk

Instagram: @giantlobsterprd

"Art is never finished – only abandoned." - LdV

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Here's a story for anyone under 30 who might not have been there at the time (I have put it into spoiler tags so as not to annoy the TL:DR contingent):

Once upon a time there was an application called QuarkXPress. It was the only game in town for desktop publishing. It was expensive, buggy, and the developer were really slow to bring in new features. Even despite all that, Quark users were loyal, because there was no alternative. Quark had a monopoly, and had grown fat and lazy on the proceeds. When Apple launched OSX, Quark opened one lazy eye, looked around, and decided it was too much effort to rebuild their software for the modern age.

Meanwhile, up popped Adobe. They were a bit of a cheeky upstart at the time, mostly known for Photoshop, and a vector app called Illustrator (everyone preferred Freehand). Adobe were hungry and lean, and created an app called InDesign to take on the fat lazy giant called Quark. They priced aggressively, turned out updates quickly, and before you knew it, people were deserting Quark in droves. Adobe were the heroes of the hour – Quark's jaded customers didn't need much encouragement to jump across.

Fast forward seventeen-or-so years and Adobe are the ones who have become bloated and arrogant. The situation is different for two reasons: first, we're talking about a suite of software rather than a single app, and secondly, the subscription pricing model means that people have to keep paying as long as they want to be able to open existing files. Clever. But what the Quark story proves is that no monopoly is unbreakable, and you take your customers for granted at your peril. Adobe's software is bug ridden, the features are often a confusing mess, and their mobile app strategy is beyond bizarre. Serif have made such leaps in such a short time that I think it's only a matter of time before Adobe get worried. And even if that doesn't result in Adobe's death in the market, if it gives them a kick up the arse then that can only be a good thing. Competition should, in theory, mean better software for everyone.


---

Dan Robinson  |  Giant Lobster Productions Ltd

Web: giantlobster.uk

Instagram: @giantlobsterprd

"Art is never finished – only abandoned." - LdV

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You can use more than one thing. If Adobe products are a must for you, go for it, while you take the advantages Affinity products offer to you.

I, for example, as a BI Consultant, use Oracle BI, MS Power BI, Tableau...

Best regards!


You'll never know what you can do until you get it up as high as you can go!   

AMD FX 8350 :: Radeon HD 7870 :: Windows 10 ::  http://mithferion.deviantart.com/

Oxygen Icons :: Free Quality Fonts :: Public Domain Pictures :: iOS 11 Design Resources :: iOS App Icon Template :: Hot to do High Quality Art :: Mesh Warp / Distort Tool Considerations

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1 hour ago, giantlobsterprd said:

Here's a story for anyone under 30 who might not have been there at the time (I have put it into spoiler tags so as not to annoy the TL:DR contingent):

 

  Reveal hidden contents

 

Once upon a time there was an application called QuarkXPress. It was the only game in town for desktop publishing. It was expensive, buggy, and the developer were really slow to bring in new features. Even despite all that, Quark users were loyal, because there was no alternative. Quark had a monopoly, and had grown fat and lazy on the proceeds. When Apple launched OSX, Quark opened one lazy eye, looked around, and decided it was too much effort to rebuild their software for the modern age.

Meanwhile, up popped Adobe. They were a bit of a cheeky upstart at the time, mostly known for Photoshop, and a vector app called Illustrator (everyone preferred Freehand). Adobe were hungry and lean, and created an app called InDesign to take on the fat lazy giant called Quark. They priced aggressively, turned out updates quickly, and before you knew it, people were deserting Quark in droves. Adobe were the heroes of the hour – Quark's jaded customers didn't need much encouragement to jump across.

Fast forward seventeen-or-so years and Adobe are the ones who have become bloated and arrogant. The situation is different for two reasons: first, we're talking about a suite of software rather than a single app, and secondly, the subscription pricing model means that people have to keep paying as long as they want to be able to open existing files. Clever. But what the Quark story proves is that no monopoly is unbreakable, and you take your customers for granted at your peril. Adobe's software is bug ridden, the features are often a confusing mess, and their mobile app strategy is beyond bizarre. Serif have made such leaps in such a short time that I think it's only a matter of time before Adobe get worried. And even if that doesn't result in Adobe's death in the market, if it gives them a kick up the arse then that can only be a good thing. Competition should, in theory, mean better software for everyone.

 

 

I am sorry, but that's an extra button to press, which I am not going to do. I can probably guess what it says anyway ;)


Patrick Connor
Serif Europe Ltd

Latest releases on each platform 

 

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1 hour ago, Patrick Connor said:

I am sorry, but that's an extra button to press, which I am not going to do. I can probably guess what it says anyway ;)

Good decision :D

 


---

Dan Robinson  |  Giant Lobster Productions Ltd

Web: giantlobster.uk

Instagram: @giantlobsterprd

"Art is never finished – only abandoned." - LdV

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4 hours ago, giantlobsterprd said:

Here's a story for anyone under 30 who might not have been there at the time (I have put it into spoiler tags so as not to annoy the TL:DR contingent):

Other than some factual inaccuracies (like Ventura Publisher and Pagemaker also available, and before QXP), it is a good tale. But like Quark turned the ship around before QXP faded into true obscurity, Adobe can also.

You are correct--competition should be good for the industry. History may prove that wrong, though. Word was never (still really isn't) the best word processor. There were always plenty of better word processors. Microsoft proved with Word that one doesn't need to build the best of anything to take and keep the market share. Pervasiveness in the market (like bundled application suites often are) can trump "better" most any day.

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9 hours ago, αℓƒяє∂ said:

Some of us....

Good suggestion !  Anyway, I deleted that as was (solely, peer to peer intention) mostly advice from old wasted fart to supposedly younger (who knows, maybe he's old as a sequoia tree) artist / designer (I'd have paid for some advice at certain age before being at 10 places, mwahaha ) so, no point in adding extra text processing computation to the Serif's servers.... :D

Spoilerizing myself....

Is cozy here....nobody disturbs me....


AD, AP and APub.  Ryzen 9 3900X, 32 GB RAM, GTX 1650 4GB, 500GB m.2 SSD, 1TB HDD 7200rpm. Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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4 hours ago, Patrick Connor said:

I am sorry, but that's an extra button to press, which I am not going to do. I can probably guess what it says anyway ;)

Lol, I'm really slow, lately... only now I got it.... brainz getting into zombie mode lately.... :D


AD, AP and APub.  Ryzen 9 3900X, 32 GB RAM, GTX 1650 4GB, 500GB m.2 SSD, 1TB HDD 7200rpm. Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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2 hours ago, MikeW said:

Other than some factual inaccuracies

...neither of which enjoyed anything like the market dominance that QXP had in the late 90s, which is the period I’m describing here. So I’ll stand by my facts. 


---

Dan Robinson  |  Giant Lobster Productions Ltd

Web: giantlobster.uk

Instagram: @giantlobsterprd

"Art is never finished – only abandoned." - LdV

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