Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I am on Page 258 of the Affinity Photo Workbook and Paragraph 1 states Quote "Above the Background Dither Layer, create a new HSL adjustment by going to the Layer Menu and etc., etc.

 

I do not see a 'Dither Layer' on the layers on this particular exercise and I do not know what  Dither Layer is anyway.

 

Can you help explain this Please.

 

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

"Background dither" is the name of a regular pixel layer on which he use the healing brush.

Look at the Layer panel screenshot on page 259.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was following the 'project' but didn't end up with a 'Background Dither' layer - must have stuffed up somewhere but what does 'Dither' mean?

 

Thanks for your reply.

44 minutes ago, Wosven said:

Hi,

"Background dither" is the name of a regular pixel layer on which he use the healing brush.

Look at the Layer panel screenshot on page 259.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The word "dither" means indecisive; hesitant; etc...

Not too sure why this word was chosen to describe a layer, but I'm sure there's a perfectly good explanation for it.


Some scientists claim that hydrogen, because it is so plentiful, is the basic building block of the universe. I dispute that. I say there is more stupidity than hydrogen, and that is the basic building block of the universe.

These are not my own words but I sure like this quote.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, travel bug said:

what does 'Dither' mean?

 

Try Google.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dither


Affinity Store: Affinity Suite (ADe, APh, APu) 1.7.3.481.
Windows 10 Pro, Version 1909, Build 18363.476.
Dell Latitude E5570, i5-6440HQ 2.60 GHz, 8 GB, Intel HD Graphics 530, 1920 x 1080.
Dell OptiPlex 7060, i5-8500 3.00 GHz, 16 GB, Intel UHD Graphics 630, Dell P2417H 1920 x 1080.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

iMac 27" Late 2015 Fully Loaded, iMac 27" Mid 2011 both running High Sierra 10.13.6 - Affinity Designer/Photo & Publisher - Illustrator CC, Inkscape, Blender, Sketchup, Pepakura Designer, MTC, Pixelmator & Pixelmator Pro + more... XP-Pen Artist-22E, - iPad Pro 12.9 B|  

Affinity Help - Affinity Desktop Tutorials - Feedback - FAQ - most asked questions

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks dutchshader and Psender for your reply.

 

I think the best explanation for me (and I am still a bit confused even then) is the one from 'firstdefence'. The only time I remember 'dither' being used frequently was when I lived in England and people used to say 'I'm all in a dither' (being confused). I'm old and still learning....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Affinity Jules,

 

Yes that is the explanation I had for the word but not understanding its meaning in the photographic editing context. I sort of get a bit of it but still find it difficult to translate into how I would use this in editing on my photos. If I let it percolate in the old brain box for a bit I might get it eventually. At my age I'm expecting to lose some of my brain retention so we'll see how I go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, travel bug said:

Thanks dutchshader and Psender for your reply.

 

I think the best explanation for me (and I am still a bit confused even then) is the one from 'firstdefence'. The only time I remember 'dither' being used frequently was when I lived in England and people used to say 'I'm all in a dither' (being confused). I'm old and still learning....

Us up't north, well, Nottingham, say "All of a dither, stop dithering, I'm in a tizz.

 

@travel bug Apparently there is an instrument from OZ called a ditheridoo :P


iMac 27" Late 2015 Fully Loaded, iMac 27" Mid 2011 both running High Sierra 10.13.6 - Affinity Designer/Photo & Publisher - Illustrator CC, Inkscape, Blender, Sketchup, Pepakura Designer, MTC, Pixelmator & Pixelmator Pro + more... XP-Pen Artist-22E, - iPad Pro 12.9 B|  

Affinity Help - Affinity Desktop Tutorials - Feedback - FAQ - most asked questions

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, travel bug said:

i think I need some dithering in my grey matter to fully get this concept

 

It looks more complicated than it really is.

I will give an example.

I used pavement around the house, and I had two types of tiles.
I could connect them like this,

2018-03-31_145023.png.1427c4e4013b0b00a995f48c3d8f8845.png

but that would make a distinctive divide.
So I used dithering, and the tile on the divider gradually mixed, so the transition is smooth.

2018-03-31_145111.png.12e85277dd132b555d810a5435d67608.png

 

The same principle is used by color printers, which with several colors (depending on the number of cartridges/toners), can create their realistic looking colors by gradually mixing them.

When editing photos, dithering is used if you need to reduce the number of colors - to avoid significant color transitions.

For example, the Safe Dither Web will replace existing colors with only a few safe colors for viewing on the web. The image quality is still decent despite significant reduction.


Affinity Store: Affinity Suite (ADe, APh, APu) 1.7.3.481.
Windows 10 Pro, Version 1909, Build 18363.476.
Dell Latitude E5570, i5-6440HQ 2.60 GHz, 8 GB, Intel HD Graphics 530, 1920 x 1080.
Dell OptiPlex 7060, i5-8500 3.00 GHz, 16 GB, Intel UHD Graphics 630, Dell P2417H 1920 x 1080.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Pšenda said:

 

It looks more complicated than it really is.

I will give an example.

I used pavement around the house, and I had two types of tiles.
I could connect them like this,

2018-03-31_145023.png.1427c4e4013b0b00a995f48c3d8f8845.png

but that would make a distinctive divide.
So I used dithering, and the tile on the divider gradually mixed, so the transition is smooth.

2018-03-31_145111.png.12e85277dd132b555d810a5435d67608.png

 

The same principle is used by color printers, which with several colors (depending on the number of cartridges/toners), can create their realistic looking colors by gradually mixing them.

When editing photos, dithering is used if you need to reduce the number of colors - to avoid significant color transitions.

For example, the Safe Dither Web will replace existing colors with only a few safe colors for viewing on the web. The image quality is still decent despite significant reduction.

 

Thanks for going the extra paragraphs for me. As *JC once exclaimed, "Alrighty Then!" I think I get it. So reducing colours doesn't give you a poorer result from a colour point of view? AND apart from helping web pages stop 'banding' is this used commonly for photographs? I haven't come across this before.  

 

I just looked up Web Safe Dither in Affinity Photo Help and up came the filter - Thanks for that I didn't realise it was there at all. Very interesting.

 

*(Jim Carrey)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, firstdefence said:

Us up't north, well, Nottingham, say "All of a dither, stop dithering, I'm in a tizz.

 

@travel bug Apparently there is an instrument from OZ called a ditheridoo :P

 

Yes that's right I remember that sort of conversation when I lived in England as a young lad but I think the 'ditheridoo' is only used by Aborigines that can't yet read music and play scales on the full blown version of the instrument. Sort of a beginners version.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am no expert on the subject but FWIW, it takes a great deal of skill to master a didgeridoo to produce the characteristic continuous drone (via circular rebreathing) & multiple resonance overtones the instrument is capable of producing. If you are interested in such things, check out the 'playing' & 'physics' sections of the Wikipedia article.


Affinity Photo 1.7.3, Affinity Designer 1.7.3, Affinity Publisher 1.7.3; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.3.155 & Affinity Designer 1.7.3.1 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iPadOS 13.1.2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, R C-R said:

If you are interested in such things, check out the 'playing' & 'physics' sections of the Wikipedia article.

 

I’m just waiting for you to tell me that you spotted some errors in the article, so that I can ask you, “Did you redo it?” :P

 


Alfred online2long.gif
Affinity Designer/Photo/Publisher 1.7.3.481 • Windows 10 Home (4th gen Core i3 CPU)
Affinity Photo for iPad 1.7.3.155 • Designer for iPad 1.7.3.1 • iPadOS 13.2.2 (iPad Air 2)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Alfred said:

 

I’m just waiting for you to tell me that you spotted some errors in the article, so that I can ask you, “Did you redo it?” :P

 

Hi Alfred, I assume your comments were actually directed at me redoing and following the ‘Workbook’ exercises not about playing the Didgeridoo. If you were asking me if I had redone that section of the book - I haven’t yet as I wanted to keep moving into the book. But I will go back to that exercise and redo it. I think it might be me missing the point but I will take more time redoing it and comment if it’s a problem in the book text. Thanks 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, R C-R said:

I am no expert on the subject but FWIW, it takes a great deal of skill to master a didgeridoo to produce the characteristic continuous drone (via circular rebreathing) & multiple resonance overtones the instrument is capable of producing. If you are interested in such things, check out the 'playing' & 'physics' sections of the Wikipedia article.

Thanks for your comments. I don’t have a musical bone in my body. But in awe of anyone that does. Especially anyone that plays a didgeridoo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, travel bug said:

I think it might be me missing the point

 

I’m afraid you simply haven’t been around here long enough to know that I’m rather fond (some might say too fond) of puns! My use of the phrase “did you redo” was nothing more than an excuse for a bit of wordplay. ;)

 


Alfred online2long.gif
Affinity Designer/Photo/Publisher 1.7.3.481 • Windows 10 Home (4th gen Core i3 CPU)
Affinity Photo for iPad 1.7.3.155 • Designer for iPad 1.7.3.1 • iPadOS 13.2.2 (iPad Air 2)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can't take everything @Alfred writes seriously. For example, if he tells you he can read maps backwards you should ignore it because that is just spam.


Affinity Photo 1.7.3, Affinity Designer 1.7.3, Affinity Publisher 1.7.3; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.3.155 & Affinity Designer 1.7.3.1 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iPadOS 13.1.2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Alfred said:

 

I’m just waiting for you to tell me that you spotted some errors in the article, so that I can ask you, “Did you redo it?” :P

 

wall i'll' be, I think mine escaped under the radar too. 


iMac 27" Late 2015 Fully Loaded, iMac 27" Mid 2011 both running High Sierra 10.13.6 - Affinity Designer/Photo & Publisher - Illustrator CC, Inkscape, Blender, Sketchup, Pepakura Designer, MTC, Pixelmator & Pixelmator Pro + more... XP-Pen Artist-22E, - iPad Pro 12.9 B|  

Affinity Help - Affinity Desktop Tutorials - Feedback - FAQ - most asked questions

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, R C-R said:

You can't take everything @Alfred writes seriously. For example, if he tells you he can read maps backwards you should ignore it because that is just spam.

 

We’re in great danger of wandering off into a discussion about ‘levidromes’. They’re a bit like palindromes, except that they come in pairs where reversing one of the words yields the other; e.g. desserts/stressed.


Alfred online2long.gif
Affinity Designer/Photo/Publisher 1.7.3.481 • Windows 10 Home (4th gen Core i3 CPU)
Affinity Photo for iPad 1.7.3.155 • Designer for iPad 1.7.3.1 • iPadOS 13.2.2 (iPad Air 2)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Alfred said:

 

We’re in great danger of wandering off into a discussion about ‘levidromes’. They’re a bit like palindromes, except that they come in pairs where reversing one of the words yields the other; e.g. desserts/stressed.

 

They might be for people who like wordplay but what about hippodromes ?

 

Are they for people who like horseplay ?


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, toltec said:

 

They might be for people who like wordplay but what about hippodromes ?

 

Are they for people who like horseplay ?

 

I suppose you’re going to tell me that the judges at horse shows are hippo-crits!!


Alfred online2long.gif
Affinity Designer/Photo/Publisher 1.7.3.481 • Windows 10 Home (4th gen Core i3 CPU)
Affinity Photo for iPad 1.7.3.155 • Designer for iPad 1.7.3.1 • iPadOS 13.2.2 (iPad Air 2)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Alfred said:

 

I suppose you’re going to tell me that the judges at horse shows are hippo-crits!!

 

No. I have no response for that.

tenor.gif.e44f205c180ed883117c832671f91052.gif


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

These are the Terms of Use you will be asked to agree to if you join the forum. | Privacy Policy | Guidelines | We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.