Xsis2

32 bit version?

19 posts in this topic

Are there any plans to release a 32 bit version of both Photo and Designer, if so when and if not why not?

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Well I must say that's a great marketing tool, totally ignore the multitude of computer users out there who are using 32 bit systems and go for the elitist approach and then call them older/legacy OS's/tech.  Nothing like winning your audience over.  32 bit may well not be 'cutting edge' and Microsoft may well be making some very quirky decisions in continuing to offer it and support it but burying your head in the sand and ignoring the existing vast user base out there i.e. those who have not yet migrated to 64 bit is in my humble opinion nothing short of stupidity.  Yet another example of the tail wagging the dog, good luck with the sales, no doubt they will improve over time.

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Hi Xsis2,

I understand your frustration but It's not that simple. Having 32 bit versions also implies resources/dev time and having to support a wider range of systems which are being (slowly) phased out. We have a limited number of resources/time and Affinity is being built from scratch precisely to take advantage of new API's/technology available today.

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7 minutes ago, RNKLN said:

Welcome to 2018!

Is that the year when the vast majority of computer users in the world are running 32 bit OS's?

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1 hour ago, Xsis2 said:

Is that the year when the vast majority of computer users in the world are running 32 bit OS's?

Got any hard data on this, to substantiate that claim?


iMac 27" Late 2015 Fully Loaded, iMac 27" Mid 2011 both running High Sierra 10.13.3 - Dell Inspiron 17 5767 i7 Laptop Windows 10 - Illustrator CC, Affinity Designer/Photo, Inkscape, Blender, Sketchup, Pepakura Designer, MTC, Pixelmator Pro etc

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Did a bit of searching myself and steam have done a Steam Hardware & Software Survey: January 2018

 

5a84aaa68cb78_ScreenShot2018-02-14at21_25_36.png.6765eff48ed073bc29f809536bb3f5ec.png


iMac 27" Late 2015 Fully Loaded, iMac 27" Mid 2011 both running High Sierra 10.13.3 - Dell Inspiron 17 5767 i7 Laptop Windows 10 - Illustrator CC, Affinity Designer/Photo, Inkscape, Blender, Sketchup, Pepakura Designer, MTC, Pixelmator Pro etc

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4 hours ago, Xsis2 said:

Is that the year when the vast majority of computer users in the world are running 32 bit OS's?

As 64-bit Windows will run both 64-bit and 32-bit applications, there's little reason for people to be running 32-bit Windows if their hardware supports 64-bit Windows.  Vista era PC's were shipping with 64-bit processors so it's likely that your PC will already have hardware capable of running 64-bit Windows.

People still running 32-bit Windows is usually because they bought the computer with a 32-bit OS and as there's no direct upgrade path from 32-bit to 64-bit Windows without clean installing the OS, that's what they continue to run even though there's no particular need to do so.

If you took advantage of the Microsoft free offer to upgrade from Windows 7 & 8.1 to Windows 10 a few years ago, it may be worth reading through the below article where it gives details about switching from Windows 10 (32-bit) to Windows 10 (64-bit) using Microsoft's Windows 10 Media Creation tool and clean installing Windows.

How to Switch From 32-bit Windows 10 to 64-bit Windows 10

If you're still running Windows 7 or 8.1 you may be able to get 64-bit Windows Installation Media from HERE or HERE to clean install with.

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3 hours ago, Xsis2 said:

when the vast majority of computer users

 

Standard computer users may not, but graphics/photo users certainly yes.


Affinity Photo 1.6.1.93, Affinity Designer 1.6.1.93.

Windows 10 Pro, Version 1709, Build 16299.125.

Latitude E5570, i5-6440HQ 2.60 GHz, 8 GB, Intel HD Graphics 530, 1920 x 1080.

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4 hours ago, Xsis2 said:

32 bit may well not be 'cutting edge' ...

There is much more to it than that. This article briefly goes into the details of why it makes no sense to run a 32 bit OS if your computer can support a 64 bit version.


Affinity Photo 1.6.6; Affinity Designer 1.6.0; AP for iPad 1.6.2 (but no supported iPad -- yet!)

macOS High Sierra 10.13.2; iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM 

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11 hours ago, firstdefence said:

Did a bit of searching myself and steam have done a Steam Hardware & Software Survey: January 2018

 

5a84aaa68cb78_ScreenShot2018-02-14at21_25_36.png.6765eff48ed073bc29f809536bb3f5ec.png

Nothing like 'cherry picking' the statistics. 

"Steam hardware statistics are made up from information sent in voluntarily by users. They do not represent the whole ecosystem, only a niche of it, which upgrades its software and hardware frequently."

Would have thought this was obvious and certainly not an applicable statistic to use to illustrate the number of 32bit/64bit OS's in existence.

I can appreciate the constraints of support and development time and very much appreciate the replies from members who have taken time to respond in a positive manner with advice on how to move forward.  Without wanting to open a can of worms I just wish those with supercilious comments would keep them to themselves, what's the point of welcoming me to 2018?  Sneering at others has never been a particulkarly attractive trait.

When I migrated from Windows 8 to Windows 10 some years ago the advice from ALL INTERESTED PARTIES was DO NOT UPGRADE to 64bit, the amount of 64bit software available was limited and most of the programmes you were using would not run unless a 64bit version had been specifically released.  The advice was strongly against changing to 64bit.  It appears that things have now changed and I will happily upgrade to 64bit.

Many thanks for the constructive replies.

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53 minutes ago, Xsis2 said:

Sneering at others has never been a particulkarly attractive trait.

 

Have you read your post?

14 hours ago, Xsis2 said:

Well I must say that's a great marketing tool, totally ignore the multitude of computer users out there who are using 32 bit systems

 

15 hours ago, Xsis2 said:

but burying your head in the sand and ignoring the existing vast user base out there i.e. those who have not yet migrated to 64 bit is in my humble opinion nothing short of stupidity.  Yet another example of the tail wagging the dog, good luck with the sales, no doubt they will improve over time.

 


Affinity Photo 1.6.1.93, Affinity Designer 1.6.1.93.

Windows 10 Pro, Version 1709, Build 16299.125.

Latitude E5570, i5-6440HQ 2.60 GHz, 8 GB, Intel HD Graphics 530, 1920 x 1080.

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@Xsis2 You were quite hostile in your response to the "No" but I ignored that and asked you to validate your claim, I personally asked you for hard data to support your claim. In the meantime, I decided to find information for myself and the only info I could find that was current and showed any info on 64bit systems in comparison to 32bit systems was the Steam info. This may not show the "total global" view but it certainly shows the path the system makers are taking, albeit as a slice of a global user base. But to just blindly come out with a statement with no empirical data makes what you say nonsense so your statement has no validity.

 

Most people I knew were told not to upgrade to 64bit if they had less than 4GB RAM, that was it end of discussion so they didn't, even on systems that were 64bit they stayed with 32bit for software compatibilities sake, at that time only handful of apps were touting themselves as 64bit but they did have 32bit options because 32bit was the norm and 64bit was just for the geeks or adventurous professionals. So, if people had a 64bit system with 32bit windows and they did system intensive work like processing video, audio 3D or hi-res images then the advice was to upgrade.

 

I'm not anti 32bit, I have just been given a laptop when some of my customers upgrade and they don't want to bin it but know its not worth a lot, so, I recycle them. It's an old Acer Aspire 1650 32bit with a 2GB of RAM and a 64MB graphic chip, I have just installed Linux Mint Rebecca and will be giving it away to someone in the near future.

So as much as I accept the future is 64bit, I'm actually keeping the pulse going on 32bit systems. 


iMac 27" Late 2015 Fully Loaded, iMac 27" Mid 2011 both running High Sierra 10.13.3 - Dell Inspiron 17 5767 i7 Laptop Windows 10 - Illustrator CC, Affinity Designer/Photo, Inkscape, Blender, Sketchup, Pepakura Designer, MTC, Pixelmator Pro etc

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27 minutes ago, Xsis2 said:

Would have thought this was obvious and certainly not an applicable statistic to use to illustrate the number of 32bit/64bit OS's in existence.

True, but the most appropriate statistic would show how many people are still using 32 bit OS's for serious graphics work. I doubt there are any incontestably definitive sources for that; however, considering the memory address space & other limitations of 32 bit systems, I would be very surprised if those numbers are very high.

 

44 minutes ago, Xsis2 said:

When I migrated from Windows 8 to Windows 10 some years ago the advice from ALL INTERESTED PARTIES was DO NOT UPGRADE to 64bit, the amount of 64bit software available was limited and most of the programmes you were using would not run unless a 64bit version had been specifically released. 

As a Mac user, the situation was somewhat different for me but I also saw a lot of dire warnings about upgrading the OS breaking apps & drivers. As it turned out, most of those warnings came from people who were poorly informed, just repeating (& usually over-simplifying) what they had heard from others, or were still using ancient apps that were no longer being maintained or updated. When I did my own research, I got a much better idea of what would & would not work. For me, the upside far outweighed the downside so it was a no-brainer to take the plunge.


Affinity Photo 1.6.6; Affinity Designer 1.6.0; AP for iPad 1.6.2 (but no supported iPad -- yet!)

macOS High Sierra 10.13.2; iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM 

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At the end of the day nothing will stop the slow march forward and I dare say in 5 years time 64bit will be the oldie and 128bit will be the latest greatest advance. I still have customers clinging on to XP as if their life depended on it,  I even have a DOS user, a photographer, he swears by his photo management system and flies around his blue and white screen. Being a bit tech savvy I actually made a custom 64bit system with bits harvested from computers customers dumped on me to get rid of. I found out by accident that all of the components I had were quite Mac compatible and ran a M'hackintosh system for 4 years before it died on me and I bought the 2015 iMac. I recently bought the 2011 iMac and for the price it was a steal, no windows system will run as well for the price I paid thats for sure.


iMac 27" Late 2015 Fully Loaded, iMac 27" Mid 2011 both running High Sierra 10.13.3 - Dell Inspiron 17 5767 i7 Laptop Windows 10 - Illustrator CC, Affinity Designer/Photo, Inkscape, Blender, Sketchup, Pepakura Designer, MTC, Pixelmator Pro etc

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47 minutes ago, firstdefence said:

I recently bought the 2011 iMac and for the price it was a steal, no windows system will run as well for the price I paid thats for sure.

Macs do perform better than a comparison with typical PC's with similar hardware specs would suggest, which is one reason used ones usually sell for more of their original purchase price than PC's. However, when buying used ones it is important to understand which Mac OS versions they can run ... & which future ones they are likely to support. That can be a bit of a guessing game.

 

For some things that won't matter but considering the increasing sophistication of malware, from a security standpoint it means that once Apple stops issuing security updates for the most recent OS version the Mac can support, it is time to either retire it or stop using it on a network where it can connect to the Internet.


Affinity Photo 1.6.6; Affinity Designer 1.6.0; AP for iPad 1.6.2 (but no supported iPad -- yet!)

macOS High Sierra 10.13.2; iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM 

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2 hours ago, R C-R said:

However, when buying used ones it is important to understand which Mac OS versions they can run ... & which future ones they are likely to support. That can be a bit of a guessing game.

Yes this Mid 2011 doesn't support Metal so any apps that rely on it will not run. An example of this is Pixelmator Pro, which requires Metal

 

Quote

Metal is a graphics technology from Apple that allows the main processor (CPU) and graphics processor (GPU) to work together more effectively, providing faster and more fluid graphics performance in games and high-performance apps.

 

These Mac computers support Metal:

  • MacBook (2015 and later)
  • MacBook Air (2012 and later)
  • MacBook Pro (2012 and later)
  • Mac mini (2012 and later)
  • iMac (2012 and later)
  • Mac Pro (Late 2013)

I've got my eye on a iMac 2013 with a 4GB card in it and 24GB so we'll see what happens in a few days. :ph34r:


iMac 27" Late 2015 Fully Loaded, iMac 27" Mid 2011 both running High Sierra 10.13.3 - Dell Inspiron 17 5767 i7 Laptop Windows 10 - Illustrator CC, Affinity Designer/Photo, Inkscape, Blender, Sketchup, Pepakura Designer, MTC, Pixelmator Pro etc

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