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Hi all, can anyone point me to a tutorial of how to produce a proper Cinemascope type image at 16:9 please?

 

I have managed to produce a 16:9 Cinemascope in Photoshop, I would love to be able to do the same in Affinity.

 

Many thanks indeed ;)

 

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Jak, what exactly want to do?

Just start a new document with the aspect ratio of 16:9 ... or use the crop tool with a custom ratio of 16:9 on an existing document.


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OK. 16:9 is the final document size with a 2.35:1 image. How can I achieve that please? The dimensions are quite important to match the original Cinemascope films and aspect ratios.

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16 divided by 2.35 is 6.8, so for a frame height of 9 units you're going to have black bars (of width 1.1 units each) at the top and bottom, as in your screenshot.

 


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Affinity Designer/Photo/Publisher for Windows 1.9.0 • Windows 10 Home (4th gen Core i3 CPU)
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16:9 == 2,35:x (where x is the factor for y canvas increase) -> x=1,322
When you have your 2,35:1 document open, got to Document>Resize Canvas in the menue
Unlock the lock-symbol between hight and width and multiply your y dimensions with 1,322
Set the ancor point to the middle and press OK. Now you can fill the newly created areas with black (or whatever you like them to be)


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iCore i7-3770, 3.50GHz, 32GB RAM, SSD, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1660 Ti, Wacom Intuos 4 Tablet, Windows 10 Pro - AP, AD and APublisher latest final & beta
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Hi all, an update.

I open my image and then crop to 2.35:1. That works fine. I've saved that crop as a custom ratio.

That is now the correct aspect ratio for the final complete image.

Using the guides in this post, thank you all, I then resize canvas.

When I apply an amount all I manage to achieve is a reclaim of my original image. It does not give me a blank increase that I can fill with black?

What am I doing wrong please?

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It should !! Watch this short video clip ...

 

 

 

Canvas_resize.mp4


Affinity Photo  1.8.0.585   -  Beta 1.8.0.555

Windows 10 Home  1909 (build 18363.657) - 64 bit processor - AMD A4-5000 APU with Radeon HD Graphics  1.50GHz - RAM 8,00 GB
Calibrated Monitor (Datacolor Spyder5 Pro)

 

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48 minutes ago, Jak Gunn said:

Many thanks indeed. That is the procedure I am following, but when I click resize, I just reclaim the part of the image I cropped out? Not a blank canvas?

 

Hi Jak Gunn

Welcome to Affinity Forums :)

Before resizing, right-click the image/layer in the Layers panel and select Rasterise to get rid of the cropped parts (which are just hidden - crop in Affinity Photo is non-destructive), then perform the resize as usual.

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4 minutes ago, MEB said:

 

Hi Jak Gunn

Welcome to Affinity Forums :)

Before resizing, right-click the image/layer and select Rasterise to get rid of the cropped parts (which are just hidden - crop in Affinity Photo is non-destructive), then perform the resize as usual.

Many thanks for the welcome, and thank you for the tip ;)

That works just fine, thank you :)

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Just in case you are doing this work so that it can go to a cinema projector with ‘Scope settings, you might consider that modern cinema uses digital cinema projectors that are pixel based – each color on the screen is sent through the lens from chips that have an exact number of mirrors creating the pixels. So, though your ratios are correct I just wanted to put in the record, for anyone’s future use, the exact pixels dimensions.

 

There are two standard, defined sizes, Flat and Scope, and two standard projection ‘sizes’, 4K and 2k.

 

Flat 4k (1.85:1): 3996 x 2160

Flat 2k (1.85:1): 1998 x 1080

 

Scope 4k (2.39:1): 4096 x 1716

Scope 2k (2.39:1): 2048 x 858

 

If your picture is going to be used through a projector, one thing to be certain of is: don’t include the black bars on your picture. If you do the internal settings will likely squeeze the picture in some manner that you won’t desire.

 

Another thing to be concerned with, if your photo is going to a cinema projector, is that the cinema standard is 12 bit TIFF, so export to 16 bits, not 8. It is better that the DCP (Digital Cinema Package) creation tool converts the 16 bit image than an 8.

 

Good luck to us all.

 

CJ Flynn

cinematesttools.com

 

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@TestTools, I recall from my youth, when Cinemascope first appeared, that the actual image was compressed horizontally, and the projector used an anamorphic lens to expand this axis onto the screen. Firstly, is my memory correct? Secondly, if so, is a similar system used today?

 

Looking at @Jak Gunn's original image, I wonder if it would not be better to start with several images merged into a panorama.

 

John


Windows 10, Affinity Photo 1.8,5 Designer 1.8.5 and Publisher 1.8.5 (mainly Photo), now ex-Adobe CC

CPU: AMD A6-3670. RAM: 16 GB DDR3 @ 666MHz, Graphics: 2047MB NVIDIA GeForce GT 630

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Your memory is correct John. That was the way that they could effectively use the film. Now, the product delivered to the cinema theater has had the magic done in post-production. The chips in the projector just plays the file through a ‘normal’ (very expensive) high contrast lens.

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