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Hello,

I've been poking around and comparing tools between Photoshop and Photo/Designer (mainly Photo for this post). I have noticed what I will refer to as a "performance" issue between the two tools.

When using the Hue/Sat tool in Photoshop you can adjust the Hue, Saturation, and Lightness for the independent color channels of Red, Yellow, Green, Cyan, Blue, Magenta, and Master. The issue I find is that in Photoshop when I adjust let's say, the Red channel, and I use the Lightness slider and bump the setting to max Lightness (200%), in Photoshop it results in the Reds of the image being turned white (completely). Whereas in Photo, the image leaves behind remnants of color.  

Why would this be happening? Is there something I could be overlooking? 

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Maybe you have enabled the HSV checkbox in the HSL Adjustment panel.

Perhaps this is because the Lightness (Photoshop) and Luminosity are two different things.

Or it’s because Photoshop has adjustment sliders to modify the range of colors, and you have a wider range of what to count as red (or other) color.

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5 hours ago, Yevgeny Makarov said:

Perhaps this is because the Lightness (Photoshop) and Luminosity are two different things.

Considering that there are several different commonly used ways of defining lightness I would not be surprised if that is why the results are different! :o


Affinity Photo 1.7.1, Affinity Designer 1.7.1, Affinity Publisher 1.7.1; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.1.143 & Affinity Designer 1.7.1.1 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iOS 12.3.1

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On 12/21/2017 at 3:55 AM, Yevgeny Makarov said:

Maybe you have enabled the HSV checkbox in the HSL Adjustment panel.

Perhaps this is because the Lightness (Photoshop) and Luminosity are two different things.

Or it’s because Photoshop has adjustment sliders to modify the range of colors, and you have a wider range of what to count as red (or other) color.

Played with both during the initial process with the same seemingly limited results.

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On 12/21/2017 at 9:36 AM, R C-R said:

Considering that there are several different commonly used ways of defining lightness I would not be surprised if that is why the results are different! :o

The possible spectrum of results due to a vast window of definitions of lightness would be problematic when working between softwares. One definition being different to another would make for some infuriating conversion between their documents results.

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3 hours ago, Sullyman said:

The possible spectrum of results due to a vast window of definitions of lightness would be problematic when working between softwares. One definition being different to another would make for some infuriating conversion between their documents results.

I am not sure why you said "would," since in fact there are at least four slightly different definitions in common use. Part of the reason for this is human perception of the properties of light is not well modeled by a simple three dimensional representation. Our eyes have three kinds of cells with varying sensitivity to the intensity of different colors of light & another kind sensitive only to its intensity.


Affinity Photo 1.7.1, Affinity Designer 1.7.1, Affinity Publisher 1.7.1; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.1.143 & Affinity Designer 1.7.1.1 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iOS 12.3.1

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Just now, R C-R said:

I am not sure why you said "would," since in fact there are at least four slightly different definitions in common use. Part of the reason for this is human perception of the properties of light is not well modeled by a simple three dimensional representation. Our eyes have three kinds of cells with varying sensitivity to the intensity of different colors of light & another kind sensitive only to its intensity.

The only reason I use "would" is the potential methods being unified in the software. Essentially "speaking that same language" to make it easier for guys like myself when moving into other software packages.

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Yes, they work quite differently. (I think this is intentional.)

 

HSL-Performance.thumb.png.9f96be78bfd4cc4fac5e0d94f20be7c6.png

 

It seems like Photoshop’s Lightness also desaturates color, while the Affinity’s Luminosity trying to keep the color saturation unchanged.

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On 12/28/2017 at 5:44 AM, Yevgeny Makarov said:

Yes, they work quite differently. (I think this is intentional.)

 

HSL-Performance.thumb.png.9f96be78bfd4cc4fac5e0d94f20be7c6.png

 

It seems like Photoshop’s Lightness also desaturates color, while the Affinity’s Luminosity trying to keep the color saturation unchanged.

Ok, seems like we're getting somewhere now. So with these same radial color wheels with the original colors values set above 50%, using the HSL tool to perform the same task ( bring REDS to +100) there are still Reds left over. Why would this happen?

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12 hours ago, Sullyman said:

Why would this happen?

 

The HSL’s Reds has a maximum effect only on pure red. That is, darker or lighter colors, or red colors with less saturation will have a smaller impact.

 

To understand the logic (in my opinion) of this, take for example a photo of a man in red clothes:

  1. in the case when you are using HSL’s Reds you operate only on bright (saturated) clothing, keeping the skin and deep shadows untouched
  2. when you create a mask of all the red colors (Select > Colour Range > Reds) and then use HSL’s Master, it will also affect skin color and will bleach the shadow

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5 hours ago, Yevgeny Makarov said:

 

The HSL’s Reds has a maximum effect only on pure red. That is, darker or lighter colors, or red colors with less saturation will have a smaller impact.

 

To understand the logic (in my opinion) of this, take for example a photo of a man in red clothes:

  1. in the case when you are using HSL’s Reds you operate only on bright (saturated) clothing, keeping the skin and deep shadows untouched
  2. when you create a mask of all the red colors (Select > Colour Range > Reds) and then use HSL’s Master, it will also affect skin color and will bleach the shadow

Unfortunately this means that the effect you can get in Photoshop with a dynamically applied filter, can only be achieved in Affinity with a baked-in mask, which does not dynamically respond to changes of the underlying layers colors.

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1 hour ago, shojtsy said:

Unfortunately this means that the effect you can get in Photoshop with a dynamically applied filter, can only be achieved in Affinity with a baked-in mask, which does not dynamically respond to changes of the underlying layers colors.

 

I think you can achieve the same result as in Photoshop with the other settings in Affinity, you can't just copy the settings. It is also possible (theoretically, I have not tried it) to create a LUT in Photoshop to copy the effect and use this LUT in Affinity.

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