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Just another drawing similar to the Don Quixote drawing that I posted recently but it is much simpler. This is a drawing that I had done probably not long after Designer was released and I forgot that I'd done it. I used this picture as my first real project to get myself used to using Designer. I am a big fan of Albrecht Dürer and I hope that you enjoy it. I've included the outlines as well. 

 

Hokusai

FourHorsemenComp.jpg

FourHorsemen.png

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Hello Hokusai
great work,
can you tell us something about your technique
e.g. how many layers are used, how much time it takes you to do this,
is used a template, and so on.

Best Reagrds
Gnobelix

 


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Gnobelix,

 

Hello thanks for the kind words. The time depends on the work but this one took me around a month or so but that is only working on it here and there. Normally after work, I'd work on it for an hour or so and a little more on weekends so it is hard to say how many hours are involved but it is a lot. I don't use very many layers, normally between 4 - 8 layers. It takes a lot of patience and a little bit of a creative streak when you have to create things that are too badly damaged or missing. 

 

Ambiroa,

 

Thank you too for the kind words. Yes, normally I do it all by "hand" stroke by stoke but some pictures have places where I can use basic shapes like the circle or square. It helps because then I can just use the circle or square tool in Designer but sometimes those pre-built shapes look too perfect and it causes them to look out of place so I have to draw the shape myself so it doesn't look too perfect. I didn't use any sort of raster to vector tracing with this picture and I normally don't. 

 

Best regards,

Hokusai

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11 hours ago, GarryP said:

Stunning. Absolutely stunning. This sort of work should be in some kind of AD showcase for everyone to see and marvel at.

 

Fully agree, as I said it already at the Don Quijote's thread. A lot of potential purchasers look at a list of features (and a lot care about performance, at least, desire an average performance), and when the features come with a side image, they tend to sell better, specially if the image is good and shows well the capability. Well, if in your list there would be a "capable of making complex illustrations", this one , or the other, are your must-haves :D . Not sure about the rights issues with the original art, though....


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Not sure about the rights issues with the original art, though....

 

I believe to remember from my art classes that Albrecht Dürer passed away more than 70 years ago … :D

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As Miguel and all the others said, this is again an amazing piece of work, Hokusai. I wouldn’t have thought that one could approach these classical works in the way you did. Your work is really unique and displays an impressing amount of dedication, artistry, and craftmanship … :o

 

(Since this is a wood-cut, I wonder if you should have worked in white on black … oh wait, Matt’s Booleans are super-fast now, so you can easily go the other way around … :D)

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4 hours ago, MEB said:

Another master piece :D The amount of detail is simply incredible...  i was talking about dedication and patience in D. Quixote thread and you already had another one ready!

MEB,

 

Thanks! It was a lot of work but it wasn't something I did recently. Don Quixote was my last project and it took me around 6 months to do. I did this drawing shortly after Designer was first released and I used it as a project to get my feet wet with Designer. I just didn't share it before but after sharing my Don Quixote I thought I would share this one too. It took me a long time as well but not nearly as long as Don Quixote did. Don Quixote was the most complicated picture I've worked on. It was very time consuming, this one was a walk in the park compared to it. 

 

Hokusai

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8 hours ago, Hokusai said:

... Don Quixote was the most complicated picture I've worked on. It was very time consuming, this one was a walk in the park compared to it. 

 

Hokusai

 Glad you said it! I was becoming a little worried about how lightly you seem to take this! Still calling this one a walk in the park does challenge my definition of patience/dedication :)

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On 15/11/2017 at 9:43 PM, A_B_C said:

Not sure about the rights issues with the original art, though....

 

I believe to remember from my art classes that Albrecht Dürer passed away more than 70 years ago … :D

 

Hehe, I knew someone would mention it...But the thing is... I believe is not that simple... Museums might have certain rights, particular licenses.... I've come to a point where I don't use anything at all if is not with a detailed license attached to it.... (but I was referring to the matter of using the image for general software promotion)


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There are several possibilities (of having issues), one of those could be as simple as the matter than despite being in public domain, you could be reproducing a book's photographs, and most published books disallow this, or photos made in a museum , ie, could happen that there photos could be taken but not to later on integrate those in a commercial product, or serve as advertisement for a  commercial product. Downloading the image from a depot where those issues would have been cleared up (and detailed in license documents ) by an entity/authority/original owner, could be a solution. But even so, sometimes is discovered that even well known public domain pictures, engravings, etc, have usage issues having the copying/usage rights in the hands of some institution, company, descendant...I mean, everything is possible , but imo is very advisable to check all first. (for a personal project like this, no need, when grabbing any PD image, imo.... )

 

In my art clases (actually in anatomy drawing classes) we were given often Durero's drawings as an example to the love of detail in anatomy. Not my cup of tea, though, I like a bit more realism (<> detail  :) ). I have my passions in the art of Vermeer, Velazquez, Ribera, Caravaggio...

 


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5 hours ago, SrPx said:

There are several possibilities (of having issues), one of those could be as simple as the matter than despite being in public domain, you could be reproducing a book's photographs, and most published books disallow this, or photos made in a museum , ie, could happen that there photos could be taken but not to later on integrate those in a commercial product, or serve as advertisement for a  commercial product. Downloading the image from a depot where those issues would have been cleared up (and detailed in license documents ) by an entity/authority/original owner, could be a solution. But even so, sometimes is discovered that even well known public domain pictures, engravings, etc, have usage issues having the copying/usage rights in the hands of some institution, company, descendant...I mean, everything is possible , but imo is very advisable to check all first. (for a personal project like this, no need, when grabbing any PD image, imo.... )

SrPx,

 

Thank you for mentioning this as it is an important topic of discussion that people should know about. I looked into this quite extensively years ago, as I've been making "new modern" versions of old artwork for years and when I got started I had two concerns. First I didn't want to infringe on anyone's copyright. From my understanding I don't because the works are clearly in the public domain (as A_B_C pointed out). You bring up a very valid point of a photo being copyrighted. You can't use someone's photo of a piece of art that is in the public domain because while the subject of the photo is in the public domain, the photo of it isn't (as far as my knowledge goes) and the person who took the photo maintains the rights to it until those rights expire (depending on the country). The thing is, I'm not using anyone's photos in my work. Everything that you see was draw by me and everything is completely vector, there are no images at all in the work. And from my understanding of the legalities involved, my version of the work is protected under copyright because I drew it (much like a photo of a famous work is protected) and as well, my versions are easily distinguishable from the originals. That is why I never use photos in any of my work unless the photos were taken by me. I also only redo art that is old and well into the age that puts them into the public domain (at least a 100 years old just to be safe). I also never recreated art that while in the public domain is being used by a company in their logo or corporate branding (like the Birth of Venus by Sandro Botticelli). 

 

As well, I'd like to point out that I'm not a counterfeiter for those that might be reading to much into the fact that I said that I like to "remake" new versions of old art;)

 

Hokusai

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Oh,! of course, you are out of any danger. And probably neither if the works was to be used by Serif to promote the performance capabilities of Designer. It was mostly a geeky/nerd kind of comment from me...speaking of which... I believe is not only if one pastes stuff into own's drawing...specially in court could be considering copying the design. For example, of a human character. Even if technically you are starting it anew, is a bit like if you were tracing a master piece over a Windows glass... As you are reproducing the design (I don't mean the "idea" as yep, that depends even more on each country's laws.) . Last time I read about it, this matter is very different among countries. So, it can end up as a bit of a hit or miss situation. 

 

Again, my common sense and what is usually seen, tells me that rarely it'd create any issue for you that they would include your screenshot in a features'list, or in twitter or Facebook.  Probably, not even if sold as a product, having the front box board with the illustration. I only mentioned it as I believe that even in the most apparently clear case, one needs to check certain matters around the PD image. (or..is my 2c in that.... :D ) . For practice and showing around here, I wouldn't worry a bit, mostly as was downloaded as a PD image.

 

 


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Museums might have certain rights, particular licenses … I've come to a point where I don't use anything at all if is not with a detailed license attached to it …

 

Of course, you are very right. I had negotiations with museums in the past myself, and I can only confirm from my experience that these are extremely delicate matters. And I must confess, I have also come to the point where I don’t use anything without a license attached. In the case of Dürer’s work, however, I am not sure how one could proceed. The two editions of the Apocalipsis cum figuris (1498, 1511) were issued by Dürer in a relatively large number of copies, and the single prints are literally spread all over the world today. So I fear it would be difficult to find out whom to talk to in this particular case. In any event, I don’t believe a current owner of a copy of the Apocalipsis would be successful in bringing an action against Hokusai … ;)

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Wow! This is simply stunning, mind blowing and unbelievably brilliant. Could look at all the detail for hours.

Thanks for sharing your talent with us.

 

George


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