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Polygonius

any way to edit an existing macro?

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Lets say i have a macro with 12 steps in my library.

Now i want another step in this macro, maybe on step 7.

Is there any way to load this macro in "edit-mode"?

 

BTW: the macros are so useful (espacilly with the "on the fly" dials and renaming the "dials") - Thank you Serif!

 


OSX 10.13.5  / iMac Retina 27" / AMD Radeon R9 M380 / Metall: on!

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No AFAIK these aren't editable!

In order to be generally more powerful in this regard, APh would overall need to have some scripting language support and a third party developers API here, which it actually lacks!


☛ Affinity Designer 1.7.1 ◆ Affinity Photo 1.7.1 ◆ OSX El Capitan

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OK, thx.

 

No real problem for me, it was just question, i do NOT miss painfully, like real font-categories for the glyph-browser (or a dedicated SVG-brwoser) or assets/symbols... I am always happy with the macros, even at this state. 

 

But BTW: are anybody know links for creative-macros, like in the 1.6 update-give away?


OSX 10.13.5  / iMac Retina 27" / AMD Radeon R9 M380 / Metall: on!

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1 hour ago, Polygonius said:

But BTW: are anybody know links for creative-macros, like in the 1.6 update-give away?

Searching the Resources forum on "macros" will find several useful ones, for example JR Macros (Workflow Aids, Tonal Effects) from Affinity's James Ritson & 38 Gradient Maps for Color Grading from user smadell.


Affinity Photo 1.7.1, Affinity Designer 1.7.1, Affinity Publisher 1.7.1; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.1.143 & Affinity Designer 1.7.1.1 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iOS 12.3.1

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Actually, you CAN edit a macro - but only in a limited way.

First of all, you have to have a document open. Once this is done, right-click on the macro (in the Library panel) and choose "Edit macro..." from the drop down menu. The Macro panel will open, and all of the macro's existing steps will be listed.

You can add extra steps at the end of the macro. The easiest way to do this is (i) click on the Run button in the Macro panel to run the existing steps of the macro; then (ii) click the Record button and add additional steps at the end. Lastly, save the new macro to the Library, giving it a unique name.

If you want to edit the middle of a macro, I know of only one way to do this, and it certainly qualifies as a "workaround." Open a document, right click on the macro to Edit the macro..., and enter the Macro panel's listing of steps. If, as the OP suggests, you've got a macro with 12 steps and you want to edit the 7th step, you need to UN-check steps 7 through 12. At this point, you've got a macro that will only run the first 6 steps, as written. So, first hit the Run button to run the 6 steps. Then, hit the Record button. Perform the new version of step 7. Then you'll have to re-record steps 8 through 12. Save that new version as a new macro, with a unique name.

No, this is definitely not optimal. But it's (a little) better than nothing.

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4 hours ago, smadell said:

right-click on the macro (in the Library panel) and choose "Edit macro..." from the drop down menu. The Macro panel will open, and all of the macro's existing steps will be listed.

 

1001 thx, that was the order i was searcrhing for! I do not know, for some reason i do not try the right mouse in AP (in other apps. thats my first try???)

 

@v_kyr, Jawoll, Mensch Mesch ist echt klasse!!!  :)

 

@RCR

That are really good links, 1001 thx! 

 

 


OSX 10.13.5  / iMac Retina 27" / AMD Radeon R9 M380 / Metall: on!

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12 hours ago, smadell said:

......

If you want to edit the middle of a macro, I know of only one way to do this, and it certainly qualifies as a "workaround." Open a document, right click on the macro to Edit the macro..., and enter the Macro panel's listing of steps. If, as the OP suggests, you've got a macro with 12 steps and you want to edit the 7th step, you need to UN-check steps 7 through 12. At this point, you've got a macro that will only run the first 6 steps, as written. So, first hit the Run button to run the 6 steps. Then, hit the Record button. Perform the new version of step 7. Then you'll have to re-record steps 8 through 12. Save that new version as a new macro, with a unique name.

No, this is definitely not optimal. But it's (a little) better than nothing.

For a complex macro, say with a 100 steps, where you want to add a new step after step 50, rerecording the previous steps 51 - 100 could be a bit of a pain.

So try this, edit the macro, (let's call it macro1) deselect steps 1 - 50, export the macro, import the macro, save it as macro2

Reopen macro1 perform the steps smadell gave you to add your new step after step 50, then whilst still recording add a final command to run macro2.  Save this as macro3

Now when you run macro3 it contains all steps 1 - 50 plus your new step 51 then runs macro2 which contains all the remaining steps up to step 100.

Have I tested this?

Nope. (Too much beer, yesterday)

Will it work?

In theory, yes.


Due to the ongoing Brexit negotiations, punctuation, spelling and grammar will be used sparingly until further notice.

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8 hours ago, carl123 said:

For a complex macro, say with a 100 steps, where you want to add a new step after step 50, rerecording the previous steps 51 - 100 could be a bit of a pain.

So try this, edit the macro, (let's call it macro1) deselect steps 1 - 50, export the macro, import the macro, save it as macro2

Reopen macro1 perform the steps smadell gave you to add your new step after step 50, then whilst still recording add a final command to run macro2.  Save this as macro3

Now when you run macro3 it contains all steps 1 - 50 plus your new step 51 then runs macro2 which contains all the remaining steps up to step 100.

Have I tested this?

Nope. (Too much beer, yesterday)

Will it work?

In theory, yes.

Good point, if macros can be edited and advanced at all this way. Further it's always highly desrable, to be able to break up more complex tasks into overall better manageable interoperating smaller chunks here!


☛ Affinity Designer 1.7.1 ◆ Affinity Photo 1.7.1 ◆ OSX El Capitan

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9 hours ago, carl123 said:

So try this, edit the macro, (let's call it macro1) deselect steps 1 - 50, export the macro, import the macro, save it as macro2

It would be great if deselecting steps & exporting the macro removed the deselected steps during export but I don't think it works like that.


Affinity Photo 1.7.1, Affinity Designer 1.7.1, Affinity Publisher 1.7.1; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.1.143 & Affinity Designer 1.7.1.1 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iOS 12.3.1

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15 minutes ago, R C-R said:

It would be great if deselecting steps & exporting the macro removed the deselected steps during export but I don't think it works like that.

No, deselecting steps will not remove them from the macro but it does stop them from running when you export and import the macro again


Due to the ongoing Brexit negotiations, punctuation, spelling and grammar will be used sparingly until further notice.

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You can also duplicate the macro, deselect all options up to the point of insertion, save the macro, edit the duplicate deselecting all the actions from insertion to end, save macro and then run macro 1, add necessary actions, run macro 2  and save. 

Thatll minimize duplicate entries. 

That said, I’ve found that macros should really be minimized to between 5-10 actions max and then several bundled in a folder as a workflow. It makes the editing process a lot easier and gives more flexibility during an edit.

Having more than 10 actions begins to become a “one click” edit approach which will leave lots of room for missing important adjustments along the edit/workflow...

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